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Is the market really dead?

coinnut86coinnut86 Posts: 1,850 ✭✭✭

I recently came across my husband's stamp collection that he inherited from his grandfather. He's near 50, with boxes of boxes of non cancelled stamps, mostly sheets. I know nothing of stamps and nor does he. They've been in boxes (plastic totes) for years. Do we just hold on to them? Is there something we should be looking for? I've only ever collect coins and know nothing of stamps.

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Comments

  • Time4aGansettTime4aGansett Posts: 383 ✭✭✭

    Really not much over the past 50 years worth much. Best bet is to go library and take out a copy of the Scott US Specialized Catalogue, peruse it and search for the stamps you have, then look up on eBay to see what the stamps are selling for.

  • 291fifth291fifth Posts: 19,709 ✭✭✭✭✭

    The great majority of unused sheets of US stamps from the past 60+ years will have to be discounted well below face value. Your local library probably has a copy of the Scott US Specialized Stamp Catalog in its reference section. Use it to see if you have any of the better issues. The prices in the Scott catalog are retail. You will actually get less, probably much less when it comes time to sell. Regardless. if you have no interest in them I would sell them for whatever you can get. Young people have no interest in stamp collecting so it seems unlikely that there will be any price rebound in the near future.

    All glory is fleeting.
  • CauponateCauponate Posts: 1
    edited December 2, 2019 5:08AM

    Yeah if your not interested in them, you should sell them. There are a lot of sites out there that has a guide of where to buy stamps like wheretobuystamps.

  • pruebaspruebas Posts: 2,538 ✭✭✭✭✭

    @291fifth said:
    The great majority of unused sheets of US stamps from the past 60+ years will have to be discounted well below face value. Your local library probably has a copy of the Scott US Specialized Stamp Catalog in its reference section. Use it to see if you have any of the better issues. The prices in the Scott catalog are retail. You will actually get less, probably much less when it comes time to sell. Regardless. if you have no interest in them I would sell them for whatever you can get. Young people have no interest in stamp collecting so it seems unlikely that there will be any price rebound in the near future.

    I don’t think even “old” people have an interest in stamp collecting either!

    Do local libraries even have copies of the Scott catalog anymore? I wouldn’t count on it. Librarians aren’t fools. Why buy them if few read them?

  • 291fifth291fifth Posts: 19,709 ✭✭✭✭✭

    @pruebas said:

    @291fifth said:
    The great majority of unused sheets of US stamps from the past 60+ years will have to be discounted well below face value. Your local library probably has a copy of the Scott US Specialized Stamp Catalog in its reference section. Use it to see if you have any of the better issues. The prices in the Scott catalog are retail. You will actually get less, probably much less when it comes time to sell. Regardless. if you have no interest in them I would sell them for whatever you can get. Young people have no interest in stamp collecting so it seems unlikely that there will be any price rebound in the near future.

    I don’t think even “old” people have an interest in stamp collecting either!

    Do local libraries even have copies of the Scott catalog anymore? I wouldn’t count on it. Librarians aren’t fools. Why buy them if few read them?

    My own library did have a set the last time I looked. I will have to check and see if that is still the case.

    All glory is fleeting.
  • ambro51ambro51 Posts: 13,280 ✭✭✭✭

    Depends a LOT on what denomination these sheets are. Regular 3 cent commemoratives, least valuable of all. IF you have high value stamps, $1 or $5 regular issues....that’s a jackpot. Good Luck

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