Hall of Famers that retired at the top of their game.

CoinstartledCoinstartled Posts: 6,797 ✭✭✭✭✭

I'll start. Barry Sanders!

Comments

  • perkdogperkdog Posts: 17,761 ✭✭✭✭✭

    I will second Barry Sanders

  • CoinstartledCoinstartled Posts: 6,797 ✭✭✭✭✭

    Bobby Jones.

  • 1951WheatiesPremium1951WheatiesPremium Posts: 1,246 ✭✭✭✭

    Michael Jordan: The Retiring Part 1

    Curious about the rare, mysterious and beautiful 1951 Wheaties Premium Photos?

    https://forums.collectors.com/discussion/987963/1951-wheaties-premium-photos-set-registry#latest

  • perkdogperkdog Posts: 17,761 ✭✭✭✭✭

    Two non HOF’ers that immediately come to mind is Robert Smith ( Vikes RB ) and Calvin Johnson

  • bronco2078bronco2078 Posts: 6,675 ✭✭✭✭✭

    MGLICKER !!

    he " retired " from the PCGS forum like a year ago sure miss that guy :(

  • DarinDarin Posts: 3,113 ✭✭✭

    Will 'the thrill' Clark

    Would have been an easy HOF'er if he had played two or three more years. Still a HOF'er in my opinion.

    Collecting: Patrick Mahomes rookie cards, the next great NFL quarterback.
  • grote15grote15 Posts: 26,639 ✭✭✭✭✭

    Sanders for sure.

    Jim Brown comes to mind also.



    Collecting 1970s Topps baseball wax, rack and cello packs, as well as PCGS graded Half Cents, Large Cents, Two Cent pieces and Three Cent Silver pieces.
  • keetskeets Posts: 20,197 ✭✭✭✭✭

    Jim Brown, who decided that it would be better to make movies with hot actresses instead of being tackled by Dick Butkus.think about any comparisons with him, he played 10 years and never missed a down due to injury!! if he had stretched his career like most modern players and gone 15 seasons he likely would have set a record no one would match.

    image
  • stevekstevek Posts: 21,023 ✭✭✭✭✭

    Jim Brown is the best example for a multitude of reasons.

  • jay0791jay0791 Posts: 2,468 ✭✭✭

    Mussina had a great last year and could have player a few more years.

    Collecting PSA... FB,BK,HK,and BB HOF RC sets
    1948-76 Topps FB Sets
    FB & BB HOF Player sets
    1948-1993 NY Yankee Team Sets
  • DarinDarin Posts: 3,113 ✭✭✭

    You could even say Roberto Clemente, as his last year at age 37 he hit .312
    He was getting better with age, as his age 34-36 seasons were absolutely monster years.
    Look at his stats if you get a chance, they're fascinating.

    Collecting: Patrick Mahomes rookie cards, the next great NFL quarterback.
  • Skin2Skin2 Posts: 1,134 ✭✭✭
    edited February 10, 2019 9:18AM

    Michael Jordan

  • JoeBanzaiJoeBanzai Posts: 4,564 ✭✭✭✭

    If Koufax qualifies I will add Kirby Puckett to to the list.

    2013,14 and 15 Certificate Award Winner Harmon Killebrew Master Set and Master Topps Set
  • HallcoHallco Posts: 2,951 ✭✭✭✭✭
    edited February 10, 2019 11:38AM

    Justify(not in the Hall of fame now but will be!)

  • SDSportsFanSDSportsFan Posts: 4,394 ✭✭✭

    John Elway - back-to-back Super Bowl wins! Only player ever to do that.

    Dave Kingman - 442 lifetime HRs, and he's done at 37. Over his last three years, he hit 35, 30 and 35 HRs, with 118, 91 and 94 RBIs. He was the A's team leader in HRs all three years, and led them in RBIs in '84 and '85; finishing second to Jose Canseco in 1986.

    The A's replaced Kingman, with Reggie Jackson in 1987, and Reggie hit .220 (roughly the same as Kingman had), but Reggie only had 15 HRs and 43 RBIs.

    Steve

  • CoinstartledCoinstartled Posts: 6,797 ✭✭✭✭✭
    edited February 10, 2019 3:49PM

    Rocky Balboa. His 6 fights in 30 years kept him agile and hungry.

  • JustacommemanJustacommeman Posts: 18,247 ✭✭✭✭✭

    My brother is a table tennis savant. I must have lost 500+ consecutive games to him. One Saturday night in 1977 at around 3am I hit every edge, won every net bounce, made zero unforced errors and beat him 23-31. I declared my self family champ and skipped around the block in utter bliss with paddle in hand. Like Apollo Creed said to Rocky there will be no rematch. I haven’t played him since that beautiful summer night. He claims he hasn’t lost since to all comers so I’m the answer to his trivia question. He remains not amused when I remind him who’s champ

    m

    Walker Proof Digital Album





    Fellas, leave the tight pants to the ladies. If I can count the coins in your pockets you better use them to call a tailor. Stay thirsty my friends......
  • bronco2078bronco2078 Posts: 6,675 ✭✭✭✭✭

    @SDSportsFan said:
    John Elway - back-to-back Super Bowl wins! Only player ever to do that.

    ??

  • SDSportsFanSDSportsFan Posts: 4,394 ✭✭✭

    @bronco2078 said:

    @SDSportsFan said:
    John Elway - back-to-back Super Bowl wins! Only player ever to do that.

    ??

    What are you questioning?

    John Elway is the only player to retire as a back-to-back Super Bowl champion.

    Steve

  • bronco2078bronco2078 Posts: 6,675 ✭✭✭✭✭

    He did stop after the 2 super bowl wins , I guess I was thinking it wasn't the top of his career as far as the prime of his ability . I guess retired at the top could mean a number of things.

  • stevekstevek Posts: 21,023 ✭✭✭✭✭

    I don't think that Koufax qualifies because in my view the topic implies retiring at the top of your game when you could have stayed at the top of your game for some years afterwards.

    Koufax's arm was shot. If he had tried to pitch the next season, he may have at some point not been able to pickup a baseball let alone throw it.

  • CoinstartledCoinstartled Posts: 6,797 ✭✭✭✭✭

    @Justacommeman said:
    My brother is a table tennis savant. I must have lost 500+ consecutive games to him. One Saturday night in 1977 at around 3am I hit every edge, won every net bounce, made zero unforced errors and beat him 23-31. I declared my self family champ and skipped around the block in utter bliss with paddle in hand. Like Apollo Creed said to Rocky there will be no rematch. I haven’t played him since that beautiful summer night. He claims he hasn’t lost since to all comers so I’m the answer to his trivia question. He remains not amused when I remind him who’s champ

    m

    Great story. Something like that happened to me in high school dodge ball. Ahh the memories.

  • ernie11ernie11 Posts: 864 ✭✭✭

    @stevek said:
    I don't think that Koufax qualifies because in my view the topic implies retiring at the top of your game when you could have stayed at the top of your game for some years afterwards.

    Koufax's arm was shot. If he had tried to pitch the next season, he may have at some point not been able to pickup a baseball let alone throw it.

    Or...he might've thrown the ball and his arm would've arrived at the plate first.

  • perkdogperkdog Posts: 17,761 ✭✭✭✭✭

    @SDSportsFan said:

    @bronco2078 said:

    @SDSportsFan said:
    John Elway - back-to-back Super Bowl wins! Only player ever to do that.

    ??

    What are you questioning?

    John Elway is the only player to retire as a back-to-back Super Bowl champion.

    Steve

    I was confused how you worded that too. I’m actually surprised that Elway is the only one to do that, no other HOF’er huh?

  • craig44craig44 Posts: 2,657 ✭✭✭✭

    I agree that retiring due to injury would disqualify for this discussion.

    it seems I remember Boomer Esaison having a really good final year before hanging them up.

  • JustacommemanJustacommeman Posts: 18,247 ✭✭✭✭✭

    Barry Sanders rushed for 1470 yards and 14 tds in his final season.

    m

    Walker Proof Digital Album





    Fellas, leave the tight pants to the ladies. If I can count the coins in your pockets you better use them to call a tailor. Stay thirsty my friends......
  • JoeBanzaiJoeBanzai Posts: 4,564 ✭✭✭✭

    Sanders and Brown would seem to be the top two.

    Jay Berwanger?

    2013,14 and 15 Certificate Award Winner Harmon Killebrew Master Set and Master Topps Set
  • stevekstevek Posts: 21,023 ✭✭✭✭✭

    I agree Sanders is also a good choice.

    I didn't follow it that closely at all, but I think Sanders retired because he was hissed about a contract dispute of some sort. and that hassle persuaded him to retire as he lost interest in playing.

    I think Jim Brown went thru something like that as well. But he also had his eyes on Hollywood in which Brown has had a very successful acting career.

    I think his first job in Hollywood was in the film The Dirty Dozen which is a very entertaining WW2 genre movie. He did a nice acting job in that role.

  • JRR300JRR300 Posts: 123 ✭✭

    @Darin said:
    You could even say Roberto Clemente, as his last year at age 37 he hit .312
    He was getting better with age, as his age 34-36 seasons were absolutely monster years.
    Look at his stats if you get a chance, they're fascinating.

    Clemente didn't retire. He was taken at a very young age.
    Sanders and Brown are the two that come to mind, and Calvin Johnson was also mentioned.
    Didn't Puckett hand em up because he had vision problems; I remember him going blind in one eye from the diabetes.

  • DarinDarin Posts: 3,113 ✭✭✭

    True about Clemente, I was just thinking along the lines of it was his last year and
    it was a very good year. That was a sad day in my childhood, I was watching TV when the news bulletin
    came on that Clemente's plane was missing and they suspected it went down.

    Collecting: Patrick Mahomes rookie cards, the next great NFL quarterback.
  • orioles93orioles93 Posts: 2,818 ✭✭✭
    edited February 11, 2019 7:42PM

    Calvin Johnson
    (he will be a hall of famer)

    What I Collect:

    PSA HOF Postwar Rookies Set Registry- (Currently 72.34% Complete)


    Ungraded Baseball Rookies (Current Count: 1,220 Different Rookie Cards)
  • JoeBanzaiJoeBanzai Posts: 4,564 ✭✭✭✭

    @JRR300 said:

    @Darin said:
    You could even say Roberto Clemente, as his last year at age 37 he hit .312
    He was getting better with age, as his age 34-36 seasons were absolutely monster years.
    Look at his stats if you get a chance, they're fascinating.

    Clemente didn't retire. He was taken at a very young age.
    Sanders and Brown are the two that come to mind, and Calvin Johnson was also mentioned.
    Didn't Puckett hand em up because he had vision problems; I remember him going blind in one eye from the diabetes.

    Glaucoma I think. Qualified it by comparing to Koufax. It was said that Puckett's good eye might adjust so he could see well enough to hit, but he said I'm done.

    I doubt that he would have been good enough to play even if his depth perception returned.

    2013,14 and 15 Certificate Award Winner Harmon Killebrew Master Set and Master Topps Set
  • JRR300JRR300 Posts: 123 ✭✭

    hard to believe that his good eye could adjust enough to be able to hit a 90+ mph fastball. The depth perception is tough to overcome. It's rare that glaucoma affects someone that young. Did he suffer from another illness that might have brought on the glaucoma? I just don't recall.

  • keetskeets Posts: 20,197 ✭✭✭✭✭

    I read the OP to mean players who retired with a lot of gas left in the tank and still able to compete at a high level. from that perspective, many players mentioned just don't qualify. the ones I noticed most were Clemente, Koufax and Pucket. they were great players to be sure but two retired due to injury(could no longer play) and the third died.

    I think Jim Brown went thru something like that as well. But he also had his eyes on Hollywood in which Brown has had a very successful acting career
    Jim Brown had received "teasers" from Hollywood and the new Browns owner, Art Modell, clashed with him over a few things. at that time, in the mid-1960's, there was some racial tension on the Team that centered around John Wooten. Jim Brown held to his principles and pretty much told Modell to "stick it where the sun don't shine." he was probably the Teams best potential Ambassador, yet he would have nothing to do with them, rejecting invitations and staying in sunny California. is it any surprise that after Modell hijacked the franchise that Brown has been available as a matter of routine with the New Cleveland Browns?? he roams the sidelines and gives motivational talks to the Team along with other involvement.

    all because Art Modell is gone.

    image
  • craig44craig44 Posts: 2,657 ✭✭✭✭

    @JRR300 said:
    hard to believe that his good eye could adjust enough to be able to hit a 90+ mph fastball. The depth perception is tough to overcome. It's rare that glaucoma affects someone that young. Did he suffer from another illness that might have brought on the glaucoma? I just don't recall.

    there are two schools of thought.

    1. In september of the previous season Kirby was beaned in his jaw.

    2. there are also suspicions,
      "Among the ocular side effects, cataract and glaucoma are common. Steroid-induced ocular hypertension was reported in 1950, when long-term use of systemic steroid was shown to increase the intraocular pressure (IOP). Chronic administration of steroids in any form with raised IOP can cause optic neuropathy resulting in steroid-induced glaucoma."

  • JoeBanzaiJoeBanzai Posts: 4,564 ✭✭✭✭

    @JRR300 said:
    hard to believe that his good eye could adjust enough to be able to hit a 90+ mph fastball. The depth perception is tough to overcome. It's rare that glaucoma affects someone that young. Did he suffer from another illness that might have brought on the glaucoma? I just don't recall.

    I agree. Not only was there TONS of stories on Puckett and his vision, I had a dog who was born with vision in only one eye. He could catch anything you threw to him with ease. I always wondered how he could do that without depth perception and was told that the good eye can compensate. This was also said about Puckett.

    Now, I am certainly not claiming Puckett could have regained the ability to hit MLB pitching. I really brought him up rather "tongue in cheek" because Koufax was absolutely unable to pitch any longer with his arthritis.

    I also mentioned Jay Berwanger the first Heisman trophy winner (wasn't even called the Heisman yet) not a HOFer, but a guy who despite being drafted first overall declined to even play pro football.

    2013,14 and 15 Certificate Award Winner Harmon Killebrew Master Set and Master Topps Set
  • bronco2078bronco2078 Posts: 6,675 ✭✭✭✭✭

    @craig44 said:

    @JRR300 said:
    hard to believe that his good eye could adjust enough to be able to hit a 90+ mph fastball. The depth perception is tough to overcome. It's rare that glaucoma affects someone that young. Did he suffer from another illness that might have brought on the glaucoma? I just don't recall.

    there are two schools of thought.

    1. In september of the previous season Kirby was beaned in his jaw.

    2. there are also suspicions,
      "Among the ocular side effects, cataract and glaucoma are common. Steroid-induced ocular hypertension was reported in 1950, when long-term use of systemic steroid was shown to increase the intraocular pressure (IOP). Chronic administration of steroids in any form with raised IOP can cause optic neuropathy resulting in steroid-induced glaucoma."

    Flonase does that , he was probably on flonase B)

  • JoeBanzaiJoeBanzai Posts: 4,564 ✭✭✭✭

    @bronco2078 said:

    @craig44 said:

    @JRR300 said:
    hard to believe that his good eye could adjust enough to be able to hit a 90+ mph fastball. The depth perception is tough to overcome. It's rare that glaucoma affects someone that young. Did he suffer from another illness that might have brought on the glaucoma? I just don't recall.

    there are two schools of thought.

    1. In september of the previous season Kirby was beaned in his jaw.

    2. there are also suspicions,
      "Among the ocular side effects, cataract and glaucoma are common. Steroid-induced ocular hypertension was reported in 1950, when long-term use of systemic steroid was shown to increase the intraocular pressure (IOP). Chronic administration of steroids in any form with raised IOP can cause optic neuropathy resulting in steroid-induced glaucoma."

    Flonase does that , he was probably on flonase B)

    Kirby was muscularly HUGE, it was hard to tell because he had a good sized layer of fat covering his body.

    I was watching a Twins tribute show about Puckett and saw a photo of him in the classic pose flexing his biceps, they were gigantic and his triceps were huge too. Bodybuilder huge.

    I have often wondered if he might have been a juicer.

    2013,14 and 15 Certificate Award Winner Harmon Killebrew Master Set and Master Topps Set
  • TabeTabe Posts: 3,130 ✭✭✭

    @stevek said:
    I agree Sanders is also a good choice.

    I didn't follow it that closely at all, but I think Sanders retired because he was hissed about a contract dispute of some sort. and that hassle persuaded him to retire as he lost interest in playing.

    He didn't like the head coach and was upset with the direction of the team. Wasn't a contract dispute. Was a bitter divorce with the Lions as they went after him for a chunk of his signing bonus. Sanders, for his part, intentionally retired late so the team would have no chance to draft or trade for a replacement.

    It's all been forgiven, however, and he's now an employee of the team.

  • bronco2078bronco2078 Posts: 6,675 ✭✭✭✭✭
    edited February 12, 2019 5:07PM

    Bernie Sanders doesn't have the stats to get into the hall he probably should retire though he's like 80

  • DarinDarin Posts: 3,113 ✭✭✭

    Colonel (pronounced kernel for some reason) Sanders should retire as well.

    Collecting: Patrick Mahomes rookie cards, the next great NFL quarterback.
  • JoeBanzaiJoeBanzai Posts: 4,564 ✭✭✭✭

    Mr. Whipple had some good years left as well.

    2013,14 and 15 Certificate Award Winner Harmon Killebrew Master Set and Master Topps Set
  • JustacommemanJustacommeman Posts: 18,247 ✭✭✭✭✭
    edited February 13, 2019 5:59AM

    Mr Clean always tested steroid free and he was fit as a whistle and squeaky clean when he rung it, I mean hung it up

    m

    Walker Proof Digital Album





    Fellas, leave the tight pants to the ladies. If I can count the coins in your pockets you better use them to call a tailor. Stay thirsty my friends......
  • BrickBrick Posts: 3,843 ✭✭✭✭

    He was simply a good cheater. No one has a body like that from simply working out and eating right. Just take a good look ay him.

    Collecting 1960 Topps Baseball in PSA 8
    http://www.unisquare.com/store/brick/

    Ralph

  • bronco2078bronco2078 Posts: 6,675 ✭✭✭✭✭

    @Brick said:
    He was simply a good cheater. No one has a body like that from simply working out and eating right. Just take a good look ay him.

    Mr Clean by definition is clean other wise he'd be mr dirty .

    Or did you mean mr whipple ? True story years later he tracked Rosie down and hacked her to pieces

  • Bjorn Borg comes to mind.

  • CoinstartledCoinstartled Posts: 6,797 ✭✭✭✭✭

    The Michelin Man was a hell of a Sumo wrestler. Unblemished record aside from the take down by the Pillsbury Dough Boy.

  • keetskeets Posts: 20,197 ✭✭✭✭✭

    Why did the Pillsbury Doughboy break up with Raggady Ann?? she had a yeast infection. :)

    image
  • cecropiamothcecropiamoth Posts: 701 ✭✭✭✭

    Paul Molitor came to my mind. He may have slipped a little bit in his last season, but he hit .341, .305 and .281 in his last three seasons (age 39 - 41 seasons) in Minnesota. He was a guy that got better and more durable as he aged and while he was outstanding in his early career, look at his age 34 and up seasons.

    Jeff

  • garnettstylegarnettstyle Posts: 1,835 ✭✭✭

    Bjorn Borg

    IT CAN'T BE A TRUE PLAYOFF UNLESS THE BIG TEN CHAMPIONS ARE INCLUDED

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