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Pokemon 1st edition collection value estimate

Hi everyone

I am trying to get an idea of the value of my Pokémon card collection.
However since most of the cards are not PSA graded, it is proving to be a difficult task so far.
Looking through the PSA price almanac, prices seem to widely differ based on grading.

The collection consists of:
-full 1st edition 1999 base set, jungle set, fossil set
-almost complete 1st edition neo genesis, neo revelations and neo discovery
-about 10-20 PSA graded cards, including a 7,5 Charizard

I uploaded pictures of the collection to imgur a few years ago
link: https://imgur.com/a/jsMo5

So basically my question is if someone could give a very rough estimate of my collection's worth and help me decide which cards are worth getting graded.
My estimate is that the condition of my collection is between PSA 7-10 (judging from comparison with PSA rated cards).

Any insight on the matter would be greatly appreciated.
Kind regards from Europe

Comments

  • RufussCkingstonRufussCkingston Posts: 150 ✭✭
    edited December 23, 2020 8:38AM

    I think the majority of condition decisions is based on the backs of the cards since those show the most wear (white). You planning to sell it as a whole collection to someone? If you base your raw cards as PSA 7's, then you can just look them up on the PSA past auction sales report and add it all up and then you can also see which cards are worth grading at a PSA 7 level, hoping for better, fearing for worst. Figure it's going to cost you $10 a card to grade and you will get them back at the end of next year!

  • So looking into the PSA pricing system, in order to get access to the 'value' pricing of 10$ a card I should join the 59$ silver subscription I assume?

  • Are you planning to sell the collection? The set appears to be 1st Edition Shadowless Pokémon. It's hard to judge by the photos what the grades would be. I noticed a few dinged corners and some centering issues. Even in mediocre grades though, that base set is worth quite a lot. The graded Charizard 7.5 is going to be around $16k. If we assume the set is all PSA 8's, you are probably talking about $7k-10k for all the commons plus the holo's at $750 each on average. I would put a wild-ass guess at around $35-$50k for the whole 1st edition set (not counting your Fossil and Jungle cards).

    IMO, most, if not all, of the true 1st edition cards are worth grading. When you submit, you need to specify the expected value after grading so for those cards that you think will score lower, value them as such. Try to get at least twenty into the sub-$100 category to save money using a value submission. PSA does give some leniency if the realized value is a little over the declared value as long as they generally hold. True, some may end up coming back at a lower grade and you might take a small hit on those but, overall, you will realize more value having them graded if you choose to sell. If you get the whole thing graded, you can post it up on PSA's site and then link to it on a listing if you want to sell the whole collection in one go.

    Also, these numbers assume PSA 8's. Obviously, a few key 9's or 10's in there would move the needle - in particular the Charizard looks like it could be a 9 - centering is a little off but not so much to disqualify a 9, imo (it looks like it's 60/40 left-right). As would a few unfortunate 5's or 6's.

    My daughter is huge into Pokémon and would be dying to see this collection! Her interest has caused me to pay attention since all she wants for Christmas this year is more Pokémon!

  • BatpigBatpig Posts: 355 ✭✭✭

    One correction - The value you supply for grading is not what you believe the post grade value will be. It’s simply an insurance value they will place on the card(s) for return shipping, so you should use a raw card value. Don’t spend a lot of time scrutinizing that, just ball park it. They will notify you if your valuation ends up being drastically off due to a high grade, but in those cases, you’ll happily pay the extra fee.

    For an example, when they were doing $99 and under bulk specials, I had cases of cards valued at $1000+ post grade that they didn’t reach out for more fees on.

    As long as it isn’t a several hundred $ plus raw card, if you can get it in a bulk sub, get it in a bulk sub, unless you’re needing to flip it quick.

  • blurryfaceblurryface Posts: 2,226 ✭✭✭✭✭

    can someone post a pic for reference here? son getting to that age. so im trying to learn and follow.

    the best ability is availability.

  • @Batpig said:
    One correction - The value you supply for grading is not what you believe the post grade value will be. It’s simply an insurance value they will place on the card(s) for return shipping, so you should use a raw card value. Don’t spend a lot of time scrutinizing that, just ball park it. They will notify you if your valuation ends up being drastically off due to a high grade, but in those cases, you’ll happily pay the extra fee.

    For an example, when they were doing $99 and under bulk specials, I had cases of cards valued at $1000+ post grade that they didn’t reach out for more fees on.

    As long as it isn’t a several hundred $ plus raw card, if you can get it in a bulk sub, get it in a bulk sub, unless you’re needing to flip it quick.

    This is from the PSA website. It specifically states that the Declared Value is the estimate of the value of the item after grading:

    "The Declared Value is your estimate of the value of the item after it has been assigned a grade by PSA. We understand you will not know the true value of the item until it has been graded, so we ask that you form a realistic, educated estimate based on your own research, keeping in mind that the Declared Value acts as a maximum value for shipping insurance purposes and in the event of a claim related to the item. It is important that you spend the time, utilize the available resources, and take the necessary steps to accurately estimate the Declared Value. PSA reserves the right to decline your Declared Value and to require you to pay for the accurate Service Level as a condition of completing the authentication and grading process."

  • BatpigBatpig Posts: 355 ✭✭✭

    @canyoubelieveit said:

    @Batpig said:
    One correction - The value you supply for grading is not what you believe the post grade value will be. It’s simply an insurance value they will place on the card(s) for return shipping, so you should use a raw card value. Don’t spend a lot of time scrutinizing that, just ball park it. They will notify you if your valuation ends up being drastically off due to a high grade, but in those cases, you’ll happily pay the extra fee.

    For an example, when they were doing $99 and under bulk specials, I had cases of cards valued at $1000+ post grade that they didn’t reach out for more fees on.

    As long as it isn’t a several hundred $ plus raw card, if you can get it in a bulk sub, get it in a bulk sub, unless you’re needing to flip it quick.

    This is from the PSA website. It specifically states that the Declared Value is the estimate of the value of the item after grading:

    "The Declared Value is your estimate of the value of the item after it has been assigned a grade by PSA. We understand you will not know the true value of the item until it has been graded, so we ask that you form a realistic, educated estimate based on your own research, keeping in mind that the Declared Value acts as a maximum value for shipping insurance purposes and in the event of a claim related to the item. It is important that you spend the time, utilize the available resources, and take the necessary steps to accurately estimate the Declared Value. PSA reserves the right to decline your Declared Value and to require you to pay for the accurate Service Level as a condition of completing the authentication and grading process."

    That’s the first time I’ve seen that and didn’t realize they had changed it. I stand corrected, but I would still be conservative and not spend a ton of time figuring value if it were me, as that will keep your own costs down. The main point is get as many as you can at the bulk price and make them tell you if the value is too low.

  • crazy - I wonder what all of those Charizards would go for today?

  • Super appreciate all the helpful answers :)

    So i shall send basically the whole 1st edition 1999 set for rating by PSA.
    What about the Charizard? I would like it if they re- rated it higher as 7,5 but obviously not lower.
    Also I'll add a few in detail pictures of the rarer, unrated cards tomorrow; would love to get your opinion on those.

  • canyoubelieveitcanyoubelieveit Posts: 158 ✭✭✭
    edited December 23, 2020 6:20PM

    @blurryface said:
    can someone post a pic for reference here? son getting to that age. so im trying to learn and follow.

    Good luck! I was dismayed at the arcane language they use and the variety of the population of cards. It took me a while to speak the language even a little. My daughter runs circles around me. But in order to understand it more, check out the extremely deep universe of Pokémon videos on Youtube. Especially watch some of the pack opening videos. Leonhart has a great series of them and he is pretty entertaining too. The videos are useful because he talks about all the different series of cards and explains the value of this or that variety quite often. Also gets you used to hearing the lingo.

  • @Europeanuser said:
    Super appreciate all the helpful answers :)

    So i shall send basically the whole 1st edition 1999 set for rating by PSA.

    I think you should. It might be an expensive investment up front but you will realize that all back and more when you decide to sell.

    What about the Charizard? I would like it if they re- rated it higher as 7,5 but obviously not lower.

    Maybe. But I don't know if PSA has gotten looser, tighter, or the same for these vintage Pokémon cards so you are taking a risk.

    Also I'll add a few in detail pictures of the rarer, unrated cards tomorrow; would love to get your opinion on those.

    Cool, glad to check them out.

  • That’s the first time I’ve seen that and didn’t realize they had changed it. I stand corrected, but I would still be conservative and not spend a ton of time figuring value if it were me, as that will keep your own costs down. The main point is get as many as you can at the bulk price and make them tell you if the value is too low.

    Yes, I would go by a recent sale of any of the common cards at PSA 8 for the non-holo cards - this is going to be $90 or thereabouts - under the $99 cap for value subs anyway. For the 16 holo's you should just figure $1000 per card unless they are obviously lower than an 8. Charizard and Blastoise warrant extra special attention. Be super critical and keep in mind the PSA Grading Standards. 65/35 centering is the minimum for a 9. Mark them down for any chips or dings. On these high value cards, PSA seems to pay extra special attention to little things. The first edition Charizard in Gem Mint condition will sell for $200k+ all day long whereas an 8 will go for $14-20k. As I mentioned before, I think it is possibly a 9 depending on the gloss (needs to be basically flawless) and back side of the card (no chipping, no fraying, good gloss) which I really couldn't judge from the photo in the binder at all.

  • By the way, keep your eye out for fakes. These 1st edition cards are prime targets, especially the holos. Look at the backs of your cards compared to the graded PSA cards. That is where you will spot most fakes. In particular, look at the varying shades of blue/light blue and how the swirling looks. Compare fonts on the printed side and watch for bolded/unbolded, or different font shapes and sizes. If you aren't sure on the holos, submit them anyway since at least then you will know for sure.

  • @dustinspeaks said:
    Aren't the real first edition cards in Japanese?

    Yes and no. Pokémon 1st Edition was released in Japan (in Japanese) several years before they were in the USA and other parts of the world but "1st Edition" refers to the first series of cards which include those printed in both Japanese and English. First Edition cards were later printed in many additional languages including Spanish, Dutch, German and others. Also, true 1st Edition cards lack a shadow along the border of the Pokémon pictured and are referred to as "shadowless" which differentiates them from the second run of 1st Edition cards which are referred to as "Unlimited" and was really a compilation set with several variations on some key cards.

  • Yes, you're right. I conflated first generation with first edition. 1st Edition came in several varieties including Base Set, Fossil, Jungle, and Unlimited. Also, another correction: It is the 1st Edition early print runs that are shadowless, not just the actual Base Set - this includes at least some Jungle cards. Wizards of the Coast published the 1st Edition. I don't know who published the Japanese cards that came before it but it was based on Nintendo games and an anime series so maybe it was whoever put out those games/shows.

    As I said, my head spins with the seemingly random ways these early sets were produced. I guess current Baseball cards can be viewed as similar.

  • This is an example just from the PSA price guide but there are lots up on ebay. Just search pokemon ("1st Edition","first edition") psa.

    There are a few sites that detail the sets. This one talks about the early sets specifically and details even the print issues:

    https://www.pojo.com/pokemon/Error_Cards/index.shtml

  • canyoubelieveitcanyoubelieveit Posts: 158 ✭✭✭
    edited December 23, 2020 10:44PM

    Apparently, some cards in later editions of the Base Set were printed shadowless also. Check these two out:


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