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What is the oldest age a professional grader should be allowed to work before they are retired?

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  • neildrobertsonneildrobertson Posts: 212 ✭✭✭

    https://www.eeoc.gov/laws/types/age.cfm

    Age should not play a factor in one's ability to grade professionally. It's the law. One's ability to grade should matter. I think grading is like a lot of sports in that is takes constant practice and exposure to stay skilled. It's not something you accumulate over time. You can even get worse at it.

    I personally think we live in a culture where age discrimination exists, so I'm cautious about having these types of discussions. I don't want to be part of the problem.

  • WildIdeaWildIdea Posts: 1,243 ✭✭✭✭✭
    edited January 3, 2019 2:00PM

    What’s the latest you could get into that game? Seems like it could be a great encore to a primary earlier profession.

  • Wabbit2313Wabbit2313 Posts: 7,020 ✭✭✭✭✭

  • Insider2Insider2 Posts: 9,090 ✭✭✭✭✭

    @Wabbit2313 said:

    @MoneyMonkey1 said:
    The older the better when grading my coins.😉

    Not so fast. As long as Skip has been doing this, he can find something wrong with any coin, especially when he is looking at it with his electron microscope! @Insider2

    This :p post needs clarification. I've graded very many coins/tokens/medals from most countries and eras with nothing wrong with them. Many modern coins have rated 70 - perfect.

    This may be helpful:

    Let's say you are buying a diamond. You have ten perfect stones to choose from. All certified and all the "C's" equal. One of those stones is the best. The difference is this: The jeweler thinks all the stones are equal. You discover they are not.

    Magnification in combination with good light and a very careful examination works on the diamond example above and also with coins. For example, all MS-65's are not equal. They are judged by many factors. Many coins are graded without any magnification. Others may be graded using a glass. The last time I checked, 4X-5X is the "published" norm. All magnification, lighting, and a careful exam does is let you arrive at a precise technical grade w/o missing anything. You'll see things that others will not see - some affecting the grade and some that do not. IMO, it is best to see everything on a coin there is to see. Then, you need to look at the coin the way 95% of the knowledgeable numismatists do IN THE REAL WORLD. That's when you assign a grade.

  • logger7logger7 Posts: 3,912 ✭✭✭✭✭

    Sometimes I wish ICG would loosen up their grading standards a little, but then the collector community may not hold them in such high regard, often even higher than Anacs....

    Just curious which graders are paid the famous six figure salaries some of us have heard so much about?

  • TwoSides2aCoinTwoSides2aCoin Posts: 40,051 ✭✭✭✭✭

    There's always a career in the crack-out game. Age has no bearing on those who know what to look for, and how to look at it.

  • ARCOARCO Posts: 3,445 ✭✭✭✭

    @Insider2 said:
    I had some sad news from a professional coin grader today. He is in his fifties and was a loyal employee for over a decade.

    While I hope to die at my desk at 100+, when is someone too old? Is there such a thing as too young to grade coins?

    How old is too old to offer subjective opinions?

  • oih82w8oih82w8 Posts: 8,144 ✭✭✭✭✭

    Age is just a number, it would depend on their abilities.

    oih82w8 = Oh I Hate To Wait _defectus patientia_



    BST transactions: dbldie55, jayPem, 78saen, UltraHighRelief, nibanny, liefgold, FallGuy, lkeigwin, mbogoman, Sandman70gt, keets, joeykoins, ianrussell (@GC), EagleEye, ThePennyLady, GRANDAM, Ilikecolor, Gluggo, okiedude, Voyageur...


  • gripgrip Posts: 9,535 ✭✭✭✭✭

    Not all muffins come out of the oven
    baked the same.

  • Insider2Insider2 Posts: 9,090 ✭✭✭✭✭

    @ARCO said:

    @Insider2 said:
    I had some sad news from a professional coin grader today. He is in his fifties and was a loyal employee for over a decade.

    While I hope to die at my desk at 100+, when is someone too old? Is there such a thing as too young to grade coins?

    How old is too old to offer subjective opinions?

    LOL, coins or congress? :p

  • BUFFNIXXBUFFNIXX Posts: 1,747 ✭✭✭✭

    30

    Collector of Buffalo Nickels and other 20th century United States Coinage
    a.k.a "The BUFFINATOR"
  • EastonCollectionEastonCollection Posts: 1,034 ✭✭✭

    @cnncoins said:
    The graders actually get "graded" on how accurate they are, specifically what percentage of coins go out the door at their specific grade. If their numbers are not up to snuff, they will know it, and if bad enough, probably will be looking for alternative work.
    I don't believe this has anything to do with age. The other possibility is that the business model can't support the number of graders and their pay structure. This may also come into play as management decides who to keep and who to let go.

    However, business is business, Imagine that they have 18 top graders that get all the grades 100% of the time right. That means they spend a lot of money in compensation and resubmissions are lower because folks don't get upgrades. Profits are lower and then they have to fire graders and hire them with graders that are not top so submissions increase. Being a public company that reports profits other market forces get in the way of integrity and short cuts are taken. This is true in all industries.

    Easton Collection
  • ColonelJessupColonelJessup Posts: 5,142 ✭✭✭✭✭
    edited January 12, 2019 8:36AM

    @EastonCollection said:

    @cnncoins said:
    The graders actually get "graded" on how accurate they are, specifically what percentage of coins go out the door at their specific grade. If their numbers are not up to snuff, they will know it, and if bad enough, probably will be looking for alternative work.
    I don't believe this has anything to do with age. The other possibility is that the business model can't support the number of graders and their pay structure. This may also come into play as management decides who to keep and who to let go.

    However, business is business, Imagine that they have 18 top graders that get all the grades 100% of the time right That means they spend a lot of money in compensation and resubmissions are lower because folks don't get upgrades. Profits are lower and then they have to fire graders and hire them with graders that are not top so submissions increase. Being a public company that reports profits other market forces get in the way of integrity and short cuts are taken. This is true in all industries.

    There are not 18 top graders on the planet, in or out of the grading rooms, who can "get it right" 80% of the time.

    However, a lot of them are good at "no-grades" at 90%+. PR67+/PR68 "B" coins, maybe not so much, but sometimes not as tough as you might imagine. MS67+/MS68 "nuclear white" Morgans slip through more often. After you've seen a few billion bucks worth of a broad range of non-modern coins, it's partially conscious and partly semi-autonomic gestalt perception. Some have a natural talent for this particular form of pattern recognition. Experience will program the results in much the same way.

    As @Insider2 pointed out, the lower the grade in terms of technical impairments, the more variances (and disparities) there will likely be in terms of negative and positive factors.

    Let me add that the vast majority of people on Social Security, including former world-class graders such as myself, have eyes that aren't worth shit function at sub-optimal levels. :'( First noticeable diagnostic for me: not being able to read the dates on 3-cent Silvers.

    "What matters most is how well you walk through the fire" - Charles Bukowski
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