Currency Error?

VeepVeep Posts: 1,164 ✭✭✭
edited January 18, 2018 2:25PM in U.S. & World Currency Forum

This back of this note shows the district numbers and seal very boldly as a mirror image of the face. I’m not familiar with this. Is it common? An error? It’s a friend’s note of which I took a picture. Thanks.

"Let me tell ya Bud, you can buy junk anytime!"

Comments

  • TookybanditTookybandit Posts: 3,271 ✭✭✭

    Cool note, but it looks to me like a post B.E.P. error that was made at home by someone using an inkjet printer. Some other folks should chime in though with more opinions.

  • TennisCoachTennisCoach Posts: 211 ✭✭✭
    edited January 30, 2018 1:33PM

    It could be a wet ink transfer of the 3rd print or it could have been applied post BEP at home using an inkjet printer. Without having the note in hand and viewing under magnification it is very difficult to tell.

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  • VeepVeep Posts: 1,164 ✭✭✭

    I don’t have the note and can’t easily get another look at it. It seems odd that the serial numbers and treasury seal would not also have transferred if it were a BEP error. Right?

    "Let me tell ya Bud, you can buy junk anytime!"
  • numbersmannumbersman Posts: 903 ✭✭✭

    Looks fake for more than one reason.Without authentication it is worth five bucks.

    Collector of numeral seals.That's the 1928 and 1928A series of FRNs with a number rather than a letter in the district seal. Owner/operator of Bottom Line Currency
  • VeepVeep Posts: 1,164 ✭✭✭

    A currency dealer told me this:

    This is an offset error. During the cycle that prints the black seal there was no sheet so the roller got the image, which was then transferred to the back of the next sheet to pass through. Fairly common. It is not an error I want to buy. Retail value I would guess would be about $50.

    "Let me tell ya Bud, you can buy junk anytime!"
  • JBKJBK Posts: 1,780 ✭✭✭✭✭

    Assuming it is real and not a private printer job, I am surprised a dealer would have no interest in it. If it is not exciting to him I can understand that, but it would be a good low cost entry into error collecting for a collector. That dealer does not seem to be interested in nurturing new collectors - that is a very bad business model.

    You can always send it to James Baker and ask him to add a real signature above his printed one. I have done that on the rare occasion I find one of his notes still in circulation.

  • Can you get in touch with the holder of the note and ask if all of the black characters on the back of the note align absolutely perfectly with the front characters? I mean dead on. If so you must have a bleed through issue. This would rule out a BEP error. If this was done by a home printer, there is no way the "artist" could match the characters perfectly with the front. My two cents.

  • JBKJBK Posts: 1,780 ✭✭✭✭✭

    @teddysmith1952 said:
    If this was done by a home printer, there is no way the "artist" could match the characters perfectly with the front.

    I would be inclined to agree, except that I assume a tech-savy person would be able to scan a real note, isolate the black overprint, and reverse it.

  • @JBK said:

    @teddysmith1952 said:
    If this was done by a home printer, there is no way the "artist" could match the characters perfectly with the front.

    I would be inclined to agree, except that I assume a tech-savy person would be able to scan a real note, isolate the black overprint, and reverse it.

    That would have to be an extremely savy tech to preform that task. And for the money involved, hardly worth the effort. Just my opinion JBK.

  • JBKJBK Posts: 1,780 ✭✭✭✭✭

    @teddysmith1952 said:

    @JBK said:

    That would have to be an extremely savy tech to preform that task. And for the money involved, hardly worth the effort. Just my opinion JBK.

    I think you and I are from an older generation. I would not know how to do it, but someone who grew up with this new technology could do it in five minutes with some computer program. The black overprint on a note is isolated so they would not even have to cut away any extraneous details, and creating a mirror image is just a click on the computer. There are lots of fake overprints on eBay.

    I suspect this one is real, though, like someone said about the inked roller.

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