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Making Master sets, or Super sets, or smaller player sets and have some showcases

I have been reading the post about super sets vs master sets. The reason I did so is because I'm a fairly hard core Yankee collector, however I'm sure some of the things that got to me are not unique to me. The big hurdle for me is the amount of cards needed for a master or super set. The modern players of course are the worst, since most of the product after 1989 when Upper Deck came into being as been a constant press run it seems. As you probably can imagine, the modern players have BIG master sets (and super sets too). For example, Derek Jeter's master set has 6,975 cards in it. I can't imagine how much it would cost (card cost, grading cost, shipping costs) to complete the master set. (As a nice comparison, Mike Moustakas' master set has 44 cards. Even Don Mattingly has over 1,000 cards (1503 to be exact).

So, I think I have come up with a good collecting fit for me, (and I realize we all have are different ways, players to collect and other eccentricities), I hope everyone thinks that at least for me, I've come up with a solution. I'm going to smaller sets, for example; a basic or master Topps set, rookie card sets and some Yankee only products. For example the 2003 Upper Deck Yankee Signatures and the autograph sets for it. Then, for all my other cards (I love autos and relics) I'll put them in a showcase and also use showcases for player cards I like. This will free up some cash for me, as I will sell any extra cards I have.

Any suggestions, comments etc. will be happily read and I'm sure I'll find at least 1 suggestion that makes sense for me.

Thanks for reading, sorry this is to long.

Brian

Comments

  • prgsdwprgsdw Posts: 503 ✭✭✭✭

    As a player collector as well this is a big turnoff to modern for me. I think what you are going to do is reasonable. I collect Dallas Cowboys cards and vintage player runs from the Doomsday defense. Primary I collect the basic sets of those players and a handful of master sets. The largest master I'm working on is Bob Lilly at 26 cards. I'm at 88% or so on that one.

    For modern, and other items like 1972 Sunoco stamps that PSA won't create a Cowboys team set for, I create a showcase. It's a nice way to share your items, place them in a digital album, etc. You can create some uniquely themed showcases, such as one I have for the current Cowboys offensive line. A friend has a great Doomsday defense showcase with rookies of a number of players not typically remembered for their time with the team or that only had cards from other teams. It's a neat way to show off your collecting niche.
    Steve

  • NGS428NGS428 Posts: 2,237 ✭✭✭✭✭
    edited September 24, 2017 12:49PM

    Yes, the master and super sets are a lifelong labor of love and probably something you may never complete. The Griffey Jr sets are massive.

    I am working on the following sets basic, rookie and basic topps. These are the most realistic. Even the basic at 221 cards is a challenge.

  • bammerbbbammerbb Posts: 162 ✭✭✭

    You hit the nail on the head Steve. I was amazed at some of the card totals in the master and super sets. And the more I've been thinking about it today, the more I've decided to go through all my cards and see what I can do. One of the things I do like are the relic and autograph cards, pretty much just of Yankees. Plus, one big benefit, at least for me who doesn't do anything today that can wait till next year, I'll be able to organize better, both graded cards and raw. Plus, I want to do some vintage topps which are big enough sets in themselves without trying to do 6,975 card set of Derek Jeter

  • bammerbbbammerbb Posts: 162 ✭✭✭

    I can understand the Griffey sets being massive. He was a great player and played in the era of lots of sets.

  • NGS428NGS428 Posts: 2,237 ✭✭✭✭✭

    @bammerbb said:
    I can understand the Griffey sets being massive. He was a great player and played in the era of lots of sets.

    Super: 5,203
    Master: 4,848

    Not gonna happen in my lifetime.

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