Home PCGS Set Registry Forum
Options

The point rating of the registry sets is a bit frustrating.

I collect Liberty Seated Dimes. My key coins in G-VG grades are worth about 45-60 points, where an 1853 dime EF with arrows is worth 120 points! I understand that PCGS is trying to level the playing field so all sets can be competitive, but this is a bit extreme to me.

I've formed a set where I've slabbed my keys first. I have many EF higher grade common date coins, but I don't want to slab anything worth under say $300.

Just venting.

Thanks,
Ken

Comments

  • Options
    TomBTomB Posts: 20,733 ✭✭✭✭✭

    I understand your frustration, but as you correctly pointed out, PCGS is attempting to level the playing field. It isn't just an altruistic goal of making all sets competitive in order to make their owners feel better about the coins, but it also fuels the need or desire to fill out the sets and, by extension, fuels the requirement for PCGS graded coins throughout the series that might otherwise never be submitted for certification. After all, many folks would be discouraged and not participate (and not spend money on certification or to acquire coins) if one or two key dates in low grade trumped all.

    At least PCGS is upfront about if and one can see the weight system they use for all the issues.

    Thomas Bush Numismatics & Numismatic Photography

    In honor of the memory of Cpl. Michael E. Thompson

    image
  • Options
    semikeycollectorsemikeycollector Posts: 931 ✭✭✭✭✭

    Well said and candid Tom!

  • Options
    oldgoldloveroldgoldlover Posts: 429 ✭✭✭

    A rare double eagle is not given the points it deserves. TomB said it best.

  • Options
    semikeycollectorsemikeycollector Posts: 931 ✭✭✭✭✭

    I can just imagine. My G-6 1874-cc dime is worth less points than an 1853 with arrows in XF!

  • Options
    RichieURichRichieURich Posts: 8,372 ✭✭✭✭✭

    @semikeycollector said:
    I can just imagine. My G-6 1874-cc dime is worth less points than an 1853 with arrows in XF!

    Your 1874-CC in G-6 is worth exactly HALF of what an 1853 With Arrows is worth in XF-40.

    An authorized PCGS dealer, and a contributor to the Red Book.

  • Options
    DIMEMANDIMEMAN Posts: 22,403 ✭✭✭✭✭

    NGC is even worse. A 67 could be worth 3000 points and a 66 of the same date is 300. Crazy.

  • Options
    DisneyFanDisneyFan Posts: 1,713 ✭✭✭✭✭

    @semikeycollector said:
    I collect Liberty Seated Dimes. My key coins in G-VG grades are worth about 45-60 points, where an 1853 dime EF with arrows is worth 120 points!

    That's quite a range in grades. I think one of the goals in collecting is to attempt to put together an eye appealing set with similar graded coins. For example G -VG or G to F or EF to AU or MS64 to MS66; etc.

  • Options
    semikeycollectorsemikeycollector Posts: 931 ✭✭✭✭✭

    I respect the idea of a set with uniform grading. It's that I want the rare keys, so I may have to go down to a grade I can afford. Also there are undervalued conditionally rare coins, which I may invest extra money into. These may be in higher grades than my common date coins, which may not appreciate much in value. I end up with unbalanced grades, but more money spent on scarce and rare coins. On the PCGS points scale, I get short changed, since my average grade tends to be lower, but I have the satisfaction of knowing that most of my coins are tough to find.

  • Options
    DisneyFanDisneyFan Posts: 1,713 ✭✭✭✭✭

    @semikeycollector said:
    there are undervalued conditionally rare coins, which I may invest extra money into. These may be in higher grades than my common date coins, which may not appreciate much in value. I end up with unbalanced grades, but more money spent on scarce and rare coins.

    Regarding Liberty Seated Dimes, how do you determine which coins are undervalued and which are overvalued? How do you treat the overvalued coins?

  • Options
    semikeycollectorsemikeycollector Posts: 931 ✭✭✭✭✭

    Hi DisneyFan,

    The Liberty Seated Dimes has a run of over 110 different dates and mint marks, not including varieties. The quality of each coin was usually based on its scarcity.

    I look at both the total PCGS and NGC population, plus any literature from the Liberty Seated Coin Club. If a coin has a low population and especially if its price is low considering its population, then it becomes a candidate to put some additional money into. Some other important factors are: How many are graded higher? Is it a better variety as a cherry pick and also is it an attractive? Was it Caced?

    One example is an 1851-O 10c AU50. It's missing the 7th star due to grease in the die. This date is tough to find AU grades and higher, especially this variety. This coin was actually a touch scarcer in AU before the Central America shipwreck was found. The pic is attached.

    As another example is my PCGS 1891 XF. It is one of the most common dates. I only spent about $40 on it. Not a coin I would invest much in. I can probably find this at my local coin show.

    So a scarcer 1851-O is in higher grade than the 1891.

Sign In or Register to comment.