Degree in Numismatics...with proposal and courses.

I am a Junior in college working towards a bachelor's degree in Numismatics. Am I only the 2nd person to do this?

I added most of the proposal that I had to give the school which includes courses. Also, which it states in the proposal, I am a dual-major concurrently working towards a bachelor's in History. Therefore, I didn't need to clog up my Numismatics degree only with history classes and was able to keep it open for other areas (economics, art, etc.). I have plans for three different independent studies, one of which I will design and produce medals, as I am also an artist but have not worked in this medium before. In addition to the courses listed, I have completed all of the general studies courses when I completed my Associate's degrees in History and Performing Arts. Keep in mind that after general courses are taken, there are not a lot of classes needed to graduate and therefore one can not add everything. So if I want to study many different areas, I could not take a multitude of classes in any subject. Also that I had to follow curriculum guidelines when designed the degree, hence the kind of odd classes here and there. As for chemistry and sciences, the classes that would pertain to numismatics had many prerequisites in order to take them. One would have to major in the subject to take those classes. The ANA courses will facilitate the actual learning about coins which would equate to 2 or 3 college courses. After this degree, I plan to continue my studies in graduate school where numismatics would be the prime area.



Rationale:
I have expressed great interest in the field of Numismatics since the age of seven, and grows nothing but stronger as the years continue to pass. Numismatics defines as the science and study of coins, medals, and token. Through the many different avenues and opportunities that exist in this field, I have already been able to indulge myself in several, including writing/research, collecting/trading, and buying/selling, Upon learning of the LIBA program offered through the Richard Stockton College, I thrilled at the prospect of the opportunity to take part in this program that could not only benefit my personal interests, but also the entire field of numismatics. Completion of the program would award me the second degree in the entire field.
Educationally, my goals comprise of better familiarizing myself with the different disciplines that make up the field of numismatics. This Bachelor’s degree in Numismatics will give me stronger backgrounds in fields which often go unheeded by other numismatists. These fields include, but not limited to, world history, political science, the theories of economics, and art. The role of numismatics in society will act as the focus for this program. To see how people react to money and how those reactions effect and reflect things about society simultaneously. With this Bachelor’s degree in numismatics, I would offer more diverse services to those who seek guidance when dealing with their objects of numismatic value; while also bringing the sense of legitimacy to this underrated field.
To prepare myself for graduate school remains the primary goal for this Bachelor’s degree. There, I can further my educational goals. Having this Bachelor’s in Numismatics will allow me to differentiate myself, not only to the vast amount of companies in the numismatic industry, but also to the many different graduate schools that look for individuality as well as commitments to one’s field in their prospective students.
Resources:
The Richard Stockton College has an ample amount of courses that will help me to familiarize myself with the fields of history, economics, political science, art, and business, all very important subjects to any dedicated numismatist. In addition to the courses offered at the Richard Stockton College, the American Numismatic Association, the foremost numismatic organization offers summer seminars taught by the world’s leading numismatists. The program could include these intensive seminars and taken for credit as an independent study, giving me the necessary education specifically in coins, tokens, and medals while concurrently learning the broader aspects of numismatics through the courses offered at the Richard Stockton College.
Evaluation:
When I reach the ends of my studies, one may determine the completion of the requirements and academic goals by looking at final grades in all of the classes chosen for the program. Assessment of the senior thesis project on one subject not yet determined may also act as determination.
Courses:
I have broken up the proposed course list for this major into four categories: (1) “Historics,” (2) “Political Science,” (3) “Economics,” (4) “Art,” (5) “Off Campus Credits,” and (6) “At Some Distance Courses.” Please note: This list includes classes that will count solely towards my bachelor’s degree in history, as well as those that will count towards both. The list also includes classes in parenthesis that transferred from the Atlantic Cape Community College.

HISTORY:
HIST 3605—SLAVERY AND EMANICIPATION—To learn about how and why anyone could consider people part of their economy, as well as how history freed the slaves from this social status.
HIST 2331—African American History since 1865—As follow up to the previous course, how the same group of people assimilated into the same society that used them as part of their economy.
HIST 3103—1930S AMERICA—To learn about when little to no money existed in the economy and how society survived and overcame this era.
GSS 3603—AMERICAN LABOR MOVEMENT—To learn about worker’s organizations to protect themselves and their money.
HIST 2128—ATLANTIC HISTORY—To learn the history of the Atlantic region. (This course will only going towards the History degree but the information of the course relates to numismatics).
HIST 2146—INDIAN OCEAN HISTORY—To learn the history of the Indian Ocean region. (This course will only going towards the History degree but the information of the course relates to numismatics).
HIST 2103—MEDITERRANEAN HISTORY—To learn the history of the Mediterranean region. (This course will only going towards the History degree but the information of the course relates to numismatics).
HIST 2120—EUROPE: 1400 TO 1815—To learn the history of Europe. (This course will only going towards the History degree but the information of the course relates to numismatics).
HIST 2121—EUROPE: 1815 TO PRESENT—As follow up to the previous course, learn the history of modern Europe. (This course will only going towards the History degree but the information of the course relates to numismatics).
Independent Study—How the social relationships between US and Asia in the 17th–20th centuries, through numismatics.
(HIST 0000—Heritage of the Western World I)
(HIST 0000—Heritage of the Western World II)
(HIST 0000—US History I)
(HIST 0000—US History II)


POLITICAL SCIENCE:
GSS 3168—Business, Government, and Society (V)—To learn how business and people attempt to receive money influence our government’s policies.
POLS 2222—President and Congress (H) (W2)—To learn the relationship between the two entities responsible for the creation of America’s numismatic objects.
Independent Study—How certain political influences of the 19th century affected both numismatics and society.
(POLS 2100—Intro to American Politics)
(POLS 2101—Intro to Government)

ECONOMICS:
ECON 3605—HISTORY OF ECONOMIC THOUGHT—To learn the history of how certain prominent people felt how economies should run.
ECON 3620—MONEY AND BANKING—To learn how money and the banking systems affect society.
ECON 3665—U.S. ECONOMIC HISTORY—To learn the history of the US economy and its relationship and effect of society.
ECON 1200—Intro to Macroeconomics (Q2)—To learn the theories of economics on the macro level.
ECON 1400—Intro to Microeconomics (Q2)—To learn the theories of economics on the micro level.

ART:
GIS 3326—Money and the American Imagination (upper W1)—To learn how society views money through the art of literature.
Independent Study—To produce one (or one series of) medal(s).
(ARTV 0000—Intro to Visual Arts)
(ARTV 0000—Art Appreciation)
OFF-CAMPUS CREDITS:

In addition to the courses studied at the Richard Stockton College of New Jersey, numismatic seminars held by the American Numismatic Association (ANA) will count for credits. The Florence Shook School of Numismatics holds these seminars in Colorado Springs, Colorado during the summer. The industry considers those teaching the seminars as top numismatists in the business today.

The ANA also offers the Numismatic Diploma Program which, according to their website, provide individuals the opportunity to obtain a “Numismatic Scholar” certificate from American Numismatic Association School of Numismatics. Students will encounter an exciting and rewarding journey into the world of numismatics and thereby acquire the knowledge and skills necessary to become professionals in the field.
Requirements for the Diploma Program consist of registration, the completion of six correspondence courses, and a 200-question, closed book, final exam. Students can opt to take correspondence courses, classroom courses, or a combination of both to complete the course requirements. Students should be able to complete the program within two years. If more time is needed due to illness, military deployment, etc., please make arrangements with the Education Department. Each student has the option of being assigned a mentor to answer numismatic-related questions while enrolled in the program. The courses can be completed in any order that the student wishes. Any required course that the student may have already completed, within two years before registering for the program, will count towards completion of the program. Students must successfully pass all individual tests for each correspondence course before applying to take the final exam. All students are required to be ANA members.
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Comments

  • What college offers such a degree?
  • I attend the Richard Stockton College of New Jersey. They have a LIBA program (Liberal Independent Bachelor's of the Arts) in which one may design their own major. I designed mine in numismatics. I am really using this as a stepping-stone to graduate school—as all bachelor's are really stepping-stones to graduate school. Eventually, I will have a Ph.D. in Numismatics.
    imageimageimage
  • Can you describe the course of study you've designed?
  • i have never heard of this - how interesting, interested in more details? are u joking - info@petitioncrown.com if real

    br
    image
    A collection uploaded on www.petitioncrown.com is a fifty- year love affair with beautiful British coins, medals and Roman brass
  • ShamikaShamika Posts: 18,516 ✭✭✭



    << <i>I am really using this as a stepping-stone to graduate school—as all bachelor's are really stepping-stones to graduate school. >>

    I know a few engineers who would disagree with this statement.



    Buyer and seller of vintage coin boards!

    image
  • MidLifeCrisisMidLifeCrisis Posts: 10,032 ✭✭✭


    << <i>

    << <i>I am really using this as a stepping-stone to graduate school—as all bachelor's are really stepping-stones to graduate school. >>

    I know a few engineers who would disagree with this statement. >>


    They just chose not to take the step. image

    I think a degree in numismatics is cool...but, unless you plan to be a coin dealer, I would be concerned about it's usefullness in getting a good job after college.
  • DNADaveDNADave Posts: 5,786 ✭✭✭
    Well, If I were designing my own degree in Numismatics, I might include:

    Classical Art
    Photography

    Early American History
    Roman/Greek History


    Special Topics in:
    US Mints
    Metallurgy
    Tokens
    Medals
    Bibliography of Numismatists

    what else could be added?


  • DieClashDieClash Posts: 3,680


    << <i>Well, If I were designing my own degree in Numismatics, I might include:

    Classical Art
    Photography

    Early American History
    Roman/Greek History


    Special Topics in:
    US Mints
    Metallurgy
    Tokens
    Medals
    Bibliography of Numismatists

    what else could be added? >>



    Physics + Chemistry
    "Please help us keep these boards professional and informative…. And fun." - DW
    ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
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  • + Business & Micro/Macro Econ.
  • DieClashDieClash Posts: 3,680


    << <i>

    << <i>Well, If I were designing my own degree in Numismatics, I might include:

    Classical Art
    Photography

    Early American History
    Roman/Greek History


    Special Topics in:
    US Mints
    Metallurgy
    Tokens
    Medals
    Bibliography of Numismatists

    what else could be added? >>



    Physics + Chemistry >>



    Oh and if one is interested in becoming a dealer/auctioneer then some basic business courses to round it all out:

    Accounting
    Finance
    Management
    Marketing
    fPromotion
    Distribution
    Logistics
    Manufactruing
    "Please help us keep these boards professional and informative…. And fun." - DW
    ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
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  • JustacommemanJustacommeman Posts: 13,228 ✭✭✭✭✭


    << <i>

    << <i>

    << <i>I am really using this as a stepping-stone to graduate school—as all bachelor's are really stepping-stones to graduate school. >>

    I know a few engineers who would disagree with this statement. >>


    They just chose not to take the step. image

    I think a degree in numismatics is cool...but, unless you plan to be a coin dealer, I would be concerned about it's usefullness in getting a good job after college. >>


    Graders make BIG money in comparison to that of 95% of the public. That's where I would head with that degree and an eye..............MJ
    Walker Proof Digital Album





    Fellas, leave the tight pants to the ladies. If I can count the coins in your pockets you better use them to call a tailor. Stay thirsty my friends......
  • MidLifeCrisisMidLifeCrisis Posts: 10,032 ✭✭✭


    << <i>Graders make BIG money in comparison to that of 95% of the public. That's where I would head with that degree and an eye..............MJ >>


    Fair point...and the money is attractive. But I'd go nuts pretty quickly if I sat in a darkened room all day looking at nothing but coin after coin after coin...
  • ShamikaShamika Posts: 18,516 ✭✭✭

    Public speaking.

    Buyer and seller of vintage coin boards!

    image
  • DieClashDieClash Posts: 3,680


    << <i>

    << <i>Graders make BIG money in comparison to that of 95% of the public. That's where I would head with that degree and an eye..............MJ >>


    Fair point...and the money is attractive. But I'd go nuts pretty quickly if I sat in a darkened room all day looking at nothing but coin after coin after coin... >>



    image . . . with MidLifeCrisis

    But I will qualify my statement


    What's ironic is that I spend quite a bit of my spare time on this hobby and much of it is sitting in any [sic "darkened"] room all day looking at coin after coin. In fact, looking a coin after coin is the attraction that brought me to this hobby in the first place. I guess the difference between MidLifeCrisis, me and the graders is that were are not "forced" to look at 'em all day long for a living! But I would argue that doing so for a decent wage, if you like it, then that's OK too!
    "Please help us keep these boards professional and informative…. And fun." - DW
    ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    BONGO HURTLES ALONG THE RAIN SODDEN HIGHWAY OF LIFE ON UNDERINFLATED BALD RETREAD TIRES
  • I would think that such a degree, with the right course of study, would be just as useful as any of the other liberal arts degrees, after all, a B.A. doesn't really give you any specific training in life, but hopefully the ability to think critically and put things in perspective.
  • JustacommemanJustacommeman Posts: 13,228 ✭✭✭✭✭
    Noted that money isn't everything. However, a prodigy grader can make six figures right out of school or at a young age. Not too many fields can match that. An accomplished grader can make surgeon plus money. A few years of that can set up a nice coin rathole or another numismatic career where it may not be possible otherwise. A dark grading room can't be as bad as an electrical shed in Lubbock can it?image

    Ask John Albanese what one of the most needed voids this industry needs to fill and he will tell you accomplished graders. Where will the next young superstars come from? MJ
    Walker Proof Digital Album





    Fellas, leave the tight pants to the ladies. If I can count the coins in your pockets you better use them to call a tailor. Stay thirsty my friends......
  • fcfc Posts: 12,729
    i think some posters are putting coin graders into an almost mythical
    creature... seriously.. it is just a skill picked up with practice. one could
    pretty easily state golfing is harder.

    i think the people who can authenticate coins have a skill that is
    more valuable then just grading coins.
  • shorecollshorecoll Posts: 4,119 ✭✭✭
    That degree would also work for significant museum staff positions. I'm sure the national collection has some skilled positions managing it.
    ANA-LM, NBS, EAC
  • JustacommemanJustacommeman Posts: 13,228 ✭✭✭✭✭


    << <i>i think some posters are putting coin graders into an almost mythical
    creature... seriously.. it is just a skill picked up with practice. one could
    pretty easily state golfing is harder. >>


    I would hazzard to guess that 99% of the general coin collecting public couldn't handle the rigors of professional grading. I would also hazzard to guess that 99% of golfers couldn't carry a PGA Tour card. Not mythical, just demanding and just my opinion. MJ
    Walker Proof Digital Album





    Fellas, leave the tight pants to the ladies. If I can count the coins in your pockets you better use them to call a tailor. Stay thirsty my friends......
  • fcfc Posts: 12,729


    << <i>

    << <i>i think some posters are putting coin graders into an almost mythical
    creature... seriously.. it is just a skill picked up with practice. one could
    pretty easily state golfing is harder. >>


    I would hazzard to guess that 99% of the general coin collecting public couldn't handle the rigors of professional grading. I would also hazzard to guess that 99% of golfers couldn't carry a PGA Tour card. Not mythical, just demanding and just my opinion. MJ >>




    I can totally agree with demanding if one does not enjoy it!
  • dbcoindbcoin Posts: 2,253
    One thing we know for sure is not in the course is spelling.

    No offense to anyone in particular image
    Investor
  • roadrunnerroadrunner Posts: 26,760 ✭✭✭✭✭
    Well, If I were designing my own degree in Numismatics, I might include:

    The art of finding bargains at garage sales.


    roadrunner
    Barbarous Relic No More, LSCC -GoldSeek--shadow stats--SafeHaven--321gold
  • lope208lope208 Posts: 1,968


    << <i>Can you describe the course of study you've designed? >>



    Like RWB said...

    It has been my experience that many self-designed degree programs are much less intensive than those designed by the college in other areas of study.
    I would love to hear the type of course load you are doing. Perhaps your experiences could help inspire someone else to attend college for numismatics.

    Cheers
    Successful BST transactions:
    commoncents123, JrGMan2004, Coll3ctor (2), Dabigkahuna, BAJJERFAN, Boom, GRANDAM, newsman, cohodk, kklambo, seateddime, ajia, mirabela, Weather11am, keepdachange, gsa1fan, cone10
    -------------------------
  • edited OP to add proposal
    imageimageimage
  • dbldie55dbldie55 Posts: 6,690 ✭✭✭
    You will need some extensive chemistry to study toning and different alloys used for coinage.
    Collector and Researcher of Liberty Head Nickels. ANA LM-6053

    imageimage
  • BroadstruckBroadstruck Posts: 27,445 ✭✭✭
    Am I only the 2nd person to do this?

    Off the top of my head I can only think of Johnathan Kern as another having a degree in Numismatics.
    To Err Is Human.... To Collect Err's Is Just Too Much Darn Tootin Fun!
  • dbldie55dbldie55 Posts: 6,690 ✭✭✭


    << <i>Am I only the 2nd person to do this?

    Off the top of my head I can only think of Johnathan Kern as another having a degree in Numismatics. >>



    Don Kagin has always used this in his ads, so that would be 2 already.
    Collector and Researcher of Liberty Head Nickels. ANA LM-6053

    imageimage
  • I truly hope you have fun with your endeavor. However, academically, your proposal is a joke. Much like Kagin's pretend PhD, your degree will not be taken seriously by actual academics, nor should it be. However, if your goal is simply to take classes that will serve to benefit you in your chosen profession, by all means proceed and thrive.
  • shorecollshorecoll Posts: 4,119 ✭✭✭
    Fletcher, I think that's a little harsh. You could argue many BS degrees are less valid, many fields require advanced degrees to be taken seriously.
    ANA-LM, NBS, EAC
  • crypto79crypto79 Posts: 8,700


    << <i>

    << <i>Graders make BIG money in comparison to that of 95% of the public. That's where I would head with that degree and an eye..............MJ >>


    Fair point...and the money is attractive. But I'd go nuts pretty quickly if I sat in a darkened room all day looking at nothing but coin after coin after coin... >>



    What ball park do graders make?
  • roadrunnerroadrunner Posts: 26,760 ✭✭✭✭✭
    That course load is interesting. My one suggestion would be that if I had to do my degree over again I'd try to find a way to include the way economics & money/banking really work. Not the stuff they teach in ECON 101 or 102 but how the system works behind the scenes. That would include a working review of the various monetary standards over the past 200-300 years.

    Good luck.

    roadrunner
    Barbarous Relic No More, LSCC -GoldSeek--shadow stats--SafeHaven--321gold
  • AUandAGAUandAG Posts: 17,261 ✭✭✭✭
    From you list of studies only Metallurgy appears to be an upper class subject.
    All the rest are freshman courses. If your schools would allow such a degree
    it would be of little value based on your studies.
    Sounds more like a minor instead of a major.
    But, I encourage you to go for it, no matter!

    bob

    PS: The US mint is always looking for bright young folks.
    BST deals: Dozens of buys/sells. Will provide a list upon request.
    Registry: CC lowballs (boblindstrom)
  • astroratastrorat Posts: 7,144 ✭✭✭


    << <i>In addition to the courses studied at the Richard Stockton College of New Jersey, numismatic seminars held by the American Numismatic Association (ANA) will count for credits. The Florence Shook School of Numismatics holds these seminars in Colorado Springs, Colorado during the summer. The industry considers those teaching the seminars as top numismatists in the business today. >>



    The challenge will be appropriately assessing the extent of learning from the courses as a certificate is one of attendance, not of attaining a specific level of competence in the area of study.

    Lane
    Numismatist Ordinaire
    See http://www.doubledimes.com for a free online reference for US twenty-cent pieces


  • << <i>Fletcher, I think that's a little harsh. You could argue many BS degrees are less valid, many fields require advanced degrees to be taken seriously. >>



    A little harsh? Maybe. However, the opinion was offered with the intent of saving a young man from wasting a lot of time and money. If he wants to do it the right way, go through real academic programs at real schools, obtain a real Phd in History, and emphasize subjects that relate to numismatics when choosing his course of study. He11, he could write his dissertation on the political history and founding of the US Mint and still have an actual degree that he could use in a variety of careers. However, to spend that much time and effort and end up with a pretend degree from some hokey school that does nothing to further his career goals other than putting a few letters at the end of his name on a resume ... just seems like a waste. And, I would wager significant money on the probability that he would regret not pursuing a real PhD. Just my two cents ...

    image
  • crypto79crypto79 Posts: 8,700
    I am still curious as to what a grader makes. The statement "serious money to 95% of the country" means north of 110k and they do better than I thought they would. I would take that paycut to work with coins.
  • messydeskmessydesk Posts: 14,044 ✭✭✭✭
    A little confused here. It looks like you're getting a degree in history and taking a lot of electives that cater to your interest in numismatics. Get a minor in economics or banking and finance, throw in the ANA diploma, and you'll have a good background for being a well-rounded numismatist. Just make sure the rigor for your major(s) and minor(s) is what it would be for a non-self-designed course of study. Calling this a degree in numismatics will primarily serve to confuse people who don't know what it is or cheapen your history degree in the eyes of people who think you couldn't handle a "traditional" course of study.

    The need not be any correlation between being a grader and a numismatist, by the way.
  • PM sent.
  • As much as you could piece together some courses from various fields involving history, art, mathematics,writing(technical) etc, while obtaining a bachelors in one relevant area and then perhaps a masters in a more specialized study, IMO such a college based degree would fall short as such institutions do not offer such courses that would truly be key in areas that pertain only to numismatics.

    A number, if not most or all, of the courses that ANA have to offer, in addition to other numismatic organizations, would need to be incorporated to such a program.
    Da-svi-da-niya USA, Zdra-stvu-eetee USSA

    Just PARK IT, the offical motto of the US Mint for the next decade

    Drecken Sie?


  • << <i>

    << <i>I am really using this as a stepping-stone to graduate school—as all bachelor's are really stepping-stones to graduate school. >>

    I know a few engineers who would disagree with this statement. >>



    BS in electrical engineering was enough school for me. Eventually a MBA will happen except my experience is the stepping stone.
  • JustacommemanJustacommeman Posts: 13,228 ✭✭✭✭✭


    << <i>I am still curious as to what a grader makes. The statement "serious money to 95% of the country" means north of 110k and they do better than I thought they would. I would take that paycut to work with coins. >>



    pm sent. MJ
    Walker Proof Digital Album





    Fellas, leave the tight pants to the ladies. If I can count the coins in your pockets you better use them to call a tailor. Stay thirsty my friends......
  • JustacommemanJustacommeman Posts: 13,228 ✭✭✭✭✭


    << <i>The need not be any correlation between being a grader and a numismatist, by the way. >>



    No doubt and I agree. Graders have varied backgrounds . My point to that there will probably be a shortage of graders and especially a shortage of young talent coming through the ranks. Grading can be financially rewarding and can be a stepping stone to successful Numismatic careers outside of the grading room. A would be launching pad. MJ
    Walker Proof Digital Album





    Fellas, leave the tight pants to the ladies. If I can count the coins in your pockets you better use them to call a tailor. Stay thirsty my friends......
  • I know a guy who drives a road grader. He makes about $30 per hour, but the work can be sporadic, with long periods under the lights.

    When my kids were 3rd graders, they earned $1 per week.
  • airplanenutairplanenut Posts: 18,619 ✭✭✭


    << <i>

    << <i>I am really using this as a stepping-stone to graduate school�as all bachelor's are really stepping-stones to graduate school. >>

    I know a few engineers who would disagree with this statement. >>

    Here's one.



    << <i>Graders make BIG money in comparison to that of 95% of the public. That's where I would head with that degree and an eye..............MJ >>

    Yes, they can make a lot, but they don't need college for it. While many dealers and graders have various college degrees, many others are doing quite fine having never gone past high school. While book smarts and experiences from college can certainly prove useful, I dare say that many tasks within numismatics are nothing more than trade skills that are learned through doing, not sitting in a classroom.

    For those wondering, I think I've heard that graders make between $40k (entry-level, mostly doing bulk moderns) to $400k+ for the cream of the crop.

    As for this particular course of study, I think I'm with a few others here in questioning it. It looks like a list of interesting topics from which you can learn a lot, but all seem to be singular topics, with no flow to expand on a specific knowledge set. The key to a strong course of study is that the courses get progressively more challenging and specific, building on earlier classes. In this case, I don't really see any building, as most, if not all, of these courses could be taken alone without any others.

    I think some courses may be a stretch in terms of your intended goal. Yes, you may learn about interactions that could have an application to numismatics, but without the courses specifically teaching it, I think the vast majority of information won't be that directly tied to numismatics (for instance, POLS 2222�President and Congress (H) (W2)�To learn the relationship between the two entities responsible for the creation of America�s numismatic objects.)
    JK Coin Photography - eBay Consignments | High Quality Photos | LOW Prices | 20% of Consignment Proceeds Go to Pancreatic Cancer Research

  • As a former college professor for 35+ years, I learned that the majority ( no reflection on Richard Stockton specifically) of these institutions are interested only in the money flow. In the long run, I couldn't fault students from taking advantage, as most had more money than ability, and the paper ( degree) is what most companies now look at. These institutions can provide college experience for the disabled or home-bound person who might not be able otherwise to go to college. My concern here is that it seems that almost any method or class is acceptable to the college mentioned, and that the curriculum mentioned for numismatics without Chemistry and Physics ( because there are too many prerequisites ) is shortsighted and illogical ( irregardless of the content of the ANA classes). The Gemology field has several companies that once were just "graders", and they saw the education/degree light and started similar "correspondence" classes to give a paper certification. Perhaps soon major grading/authentication companies will also offer a paper degree in Numismatics. It is a money maker. IMO. Take the Chemistry and Physics no matter how long it takes.

    Jim

  • I wish you well jessecarlk.
    I do think you ought to take some training that'll give you a paycheck if this degree proves to be not worth the paper it's printed on, though.
    Sign up for night school at your community college for typewriter repair classes or something similar so you have a skill to sell.

    Ray
  • jamesfsmjamesfsm Posts: 694 ✭✭
    I grew up near the Richard Stockton College of New Jersey, then known as Stockton State. It is near Atlantic City and caters to the gaming trade, offering degrees related to hotels and hospitality. They are branching into a "green campus" of the future and other endeavors but the location is a bit isolated and it will likely always be tied to hospitality.


  • << <i>I would hazzard to guess that 99% of the general coin collecting public couldn't handle the rigors of professional grading. I would also hazzard to guess that 99% of golfers couldn't carry a PGA Tour card. Not mythical, just demanding and just my opinion. MJ >>


    I think you are way low on the golfer number. As to the "rigors" of grading, I couldn't say, but that's something that
    I believe many more people could achieve than could ever hope to earn a PGA tour card, no matter how much work
    they put in.
    "I never forget a face, but in your case I'll make an exception." -Groucho Marx
  • BBNBBN Posts: 3,614 ✭✭✭


    << <i>I attend the Richard Stockton College of New Jersey. They have a LIBA program (Liberal Independent Bachelor's of the Arts) in which one may design their own major. I designed mine in numismatics. I am really using this as a stepping-stone to graduate school—as all bachelor's are really stepping-stones to graduate school. Eventually, I will have a Ph.D. in Numismatics. >>



    Neat idea, but I don't know that I would call that a degree in umismatics as much as it would be a univerty studies dgree with a minor in history. If they actually label "numismatics" on your degree then more power to you.image
    image


  • << <i>

    << <i>Fletcher, I think that's a little harsh. You could argue many BS degrees are less valid, many fields require advanced degrees to be taken seriously. >>



    A little harsh? Maybe. However, the opinion was offered with the intent of saving a young man from wasting a lot of time and money. If he wants to do it the right way, go through real academic programs at real schools, obtain a real Phd in History, and emphasize subjects that relate to numismatics when choosing his course of study. He11, he could write his dissertation on the political history and founding of the US Mint and still have an actual degree that he could use in a variety of careers. However, to spend that much time and effort and end up with a pretend degree from some hokey school that does nothing to further his career goals other than putting a few letters at the end of his name on a resume ... just seems like a waste. And, I would wager significant money on the probability that he would regret not pursuing a real PhD. Just my two cents ...

    image >>

    ]

    While Fletcher may be harsh, he is also right.
  • I actually am going for history too. Like stated in the OP, I'm a dual major...one in history, the other in numismatics. I've since added a minor in Chemistry for those of you who felt it to be so important. Thanks for all the advice everyone, but I'm going to do it how I'm going to do it.
    imageimageimage
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