Gold pattern (Attention RKKay)

RYKRYK Posts: 35,279 ✭✭✭✭
I saw this coin at the ANA and told Rick about it and wanted to make sure that Rick at least saw the picture:

image

I think it is a fabulous design. Here is what Doug Winter has to say about this NGC Pr-63 example:

Gobrecht Liberty Cap Gold Dollar struck in gold with a Plain Edge. Listed as an R-5 in the new Judd book but probably a bit rarer than this this. Attractive for the grade with original medium golden-orange coloration over reflective, lightly hairlined surfaces. This is a desirable issue as it is really the only gold pattern (struck in gold) that is both attractive and affordable. It is also a very important issue for the gold dollar collector as it represents the Mint's first experiement with this issue.

"There are no called strikes in coin collecting."--Henry David Thoreau RYK

Comments

  • MrEurekaMrEureka Posts: 21,232 ✭✭✭✭✭
    Here's another. Notice how it's struck over an 1859 gold dollar!

    image
    Andy Lustig

    Doggedly collecting coins of the Central American Republic……………………...Visit the Society of US Pattern Collectors at USPatterns.com.

    image
  • RKKayRKKay Posts: 2,867 ✭✭✭
    Thanks, RYK and MrEureka. I love the design. You selling the one struck over the gold $1, Andy?image

    BTW, Robert, isn't that the coin your son picked out of our box on the treasure hunt?image
    Rick Kay
    Specializing in 1854 and 1855 large FE patterns

    <a target=new class=ftalternatingbarlinklarge href="http://www.cleatskins.com/"> Cleatskins: Take Your Cleats to the Street
  • MrEurekaMrEureka Posts: 21,232 ✭✭✭✭✭
    You selling the one struck over the gold $1, Andy?

    Not mine to sell, unfortunately.
    Andy Lustig

    Doggedly collecting coins of the Central American Republic……………………...Visit the Society of US Pattern Collectors at USPatterns.com.

    image
  • RKKayRKKay Posts: 2,867 ✭✭✭


    << <i>Not mine to sell, unfortunately. >>



    Come on! I know you can find it.image
    Rick Kay
    Specializing in 1854 and 1855 large FE patterns

    <a target=new class=ftalternatingbarlinklarge href="http://www.cleatskins.com/"> Cleatskins: Take Your Cleats to the Street
  • krankykranky Posts: 8,732 ✭✭✭
    Oh, he knows where it is.

    That is definitely one of the coolest designs ever.

    New collectors, please educate yourself before spending money on coins; there are people who believe that using numismatic knowledge to rip the naïve is what this hobby is all about.

  • northcoinnorthcoin Posts: 4,741 ✭✭✭✭✭
    Is the first one for sale? What is meant by "affordable?" (When I go to Doug's site, "Raregoldcoins.com" I am unable to get any of his inventory to download.)
  • LakesammmanLakesammman Posts: 15,368 ✭✭✭✭✭
    On the Pinnacle web site for 15K (look under the inventory category patterns).
    "My friends who see my collection sometimes ask what something costs. I tell them and they are in awe at my stupidity." (Baccaruda, 12/03).
    I find it hard to believe that he (Trump) rushed to some hotel to meet girls of loose morals, although ours are undoubtedly the best in the world. (Putin 1/17)
    Gone but not forgotten. IGWT, Speedy, Bear, BigE, HokieFore, John Burns, Russ

  • Now those are cool.

    Those hats are called Phrygian caps that were worn by emancipated slaves in Ancient Rome to signify their freedom.

    Miss Liberty donned one on the gold Capped Bust coins. During the 18th Century the red Phrygian caps were held up on a pole during the Revolutionary War and in the French Revolution and soon evolved into a symbol for Liberty.

    image
    My posts viewed image times
    since 8/1/6
  • BaleyBaley Posts: 20,599 ✭✭✭✭✭
    Great coins! and would make an excellent companion in a collection with

    This Piece

    Liberty: Parent of Science & Industry

  • CoinosaurusCoinosaurus Posts: 8,994 ✭✭✭✭
    The coin Baley links to is described as "MT-20", and "MT-21" in the Bowers catalog - is this a reference to some book about mint medals?? I'm interested in reading up on it.......
  • RYKRYK Posts: 35,279 ✭✭✭✭
    BTW, Robert, isn't that the coin your son picked out of our box on the treasure hunt?

    Rick, if my son (age 5) picked a Judd-67 out of the "treasure box" it would probably take a heck of a lot of Yugioh cards to get it from him. Even he knows a cool coin when he sees one. He is still mad at me for not buying another gold coin pattern (half eagle in copper) months ago.

    "There are no called strikes in coin collecting."--Henry David Thoreau RYK
  • RKKayRKKay Posts: 2,867 ✭✭✭
    image Just wait til he's 11 and downloading songs on to and Ipod.image
    Rick Kay
    Specializing in 1854 and 1855 large FE patterns

    <a target=new class=ftalternatingbarlinklarge href="http://www.cleatskins.com/"> Cleatskins: Take Your Cleats to the Street
  • WeissWeiss Posts: 7,896 ✭✭✭✭✭
    seems like I've seen that obverse before...


    image


    1825 Mexican 8 Reales
    We are like children who look at print and see a serpent in the last letter but one, and a sword in the last.
    --Severian the Lame
  • MrEurekaMrEureka Posts: 21,232 ✭✭✭✭✭
    image

    imageimage


    Did they make a good choice?
    Andy Lustig

    Doggedly collecting coins of the Central American Republic……………………...Visit the Society of US Pattern Collectors at USPatterns.com.

    image
  • RYKRYK Posts: 35,279 ✭✭✭✭
    Oooh...

    I like "cap" in the 3c pattern. Can I get one of those?

    R

    "There are no called strikes in coin collecting."--Henry David Thoreau RYK
  • EagleEyeEagleEye Posts: 7,545 ✭✭✭✭✭
    The Phrygian cap or Liberty cap is a soft conical cap with the top pulled forward, worn by the inhabitants of Phrygia, a region of central Anatolia (Turkey) in antiquity. The Phrygian cap was worn during the Roman Empire by former slaves who had been emancipated by their master and whose descendants were therefore considered citizens of the Empire. This usage is often considered the root of its meaning as a symbol of liberty.

    When James Longacre was considering a better symbol of liberty when designing the cent in 1858 he decided to represent it with the Indian Head. Rather than being free by the discretion of others (as the cap portrayed), the American Indians were free by birthright, he reasoned. Too bad the Government didn't recognize that freedom.
    Rick Snow, Eagle Eye Rare Coins, Inc.Check out my new web site:
  • WeissWeiss Posts: 7,896 ✭✭✭✭✭
    My dad was from NC. I bought him a NC confederate note featuring liberty with the phrygian cap. I found it kind of ironic that a symbol representing freedom from slavery would be used on a confederate bill.
    We are like children who look at print and see a serpent in the last letter but one, and a sword in the last.
    --Severian the Lame
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