Home U.S. Coin Forum
Options

Suspicious buyers--can you cancel ebay sale without trouble?

logger7logger7 Posts: 8,091 ✭✭✭✭✭
edited April 2, 2024 5:01PM in U.S. Coin Forum

I sold a couple relatively inexpensive items to an ebay buyer with this address/company on google: https://tinyurl.com/7wsraaf7

After checking out all the problem feedback of sellers saying that the buyer claimed the items were not received, I contacted one of ebay's representatives that said they would stand behind me in cancelling the transactions.

10:36:49 UTC Joseph Valiente Dane
No worries, I know how concerning it is to transact with a suspicious buyer Thomas, for this, feel free to cancel the transaction, as I'll back you up on this.
10:37:26 UTC Joseph Valiente Dane
If you decided to cancel the order, I'll noting this on my end, so your seller's performance won't be negatively impacted.

A week later I get a couple negative feedbacks from the buyer. I contacted ebay and initially they said the negs did not violate their terms of service. Then I heard from someone else after citing the chat transcript where the ebay rep. said they would stand behind me. I get another response saying that the negatives did not violate the terms. Probably my next remedy will be going over their head to the state oversight.

Comments

  • Options
    jt88jt88 Posts: 2,838 ✭✭✭✭✭

    You can cancel eBay sale, the worst is they will give you a transaction defect rate 1. You can have four in a year.

  • Options
    yspsalesyspsales Posts: 2,223 ✭✭✭✭✭
    edited April 2, 2024 10:32PM

    You still own the coin for at least 30 days after the sale, based on their return policy.

    I just cancel and refund the buyer and move on.

    Have done it a few times without any issue.

    BST: KindaNewish (3/21/21), WQuarterFreddie (3/30/21), Meltdown (4/6/21), DBSTrader2 (5/5/21) AKA- unclemonkey on Blow Out

  • Options
    spyglassdesignspyglassdesign Posts: 1,514 ✭✭✭✭✭

    You have to be very careful in selecting the reason. From a friend who used to do ebay, the only way to protect yourself is to select buyer requested... There doesn't seem to be anything they can do AFAIK if you select that option.

    Ebay is not a friend to sellers most of the time.

  • Options
    davewesendavewesen Posts: 5,858 ✭✭✭✭✭

    They are a mail forwarding service to people in other countries?

  • Options
    PerryHallPerryHall Posts: 45,441 ✭✭✭✭✭

    A couple of years ago, I bought a gold coin on eBay for a very good price and I immediately paid for it. The seller quickly refunded my money claiming that he lost my coin. It was obvious he didn't like the price he got for the coin. I gave him a negative review and ruined his 100% perfect feedback. He was not happy to say the least and neither was I. :#

    Worry is the interest you pay on a debt you may not owe.

  • Options

    I have seen negative feedback removed by eBay for cancelled sales and always wondered what the formula was for that to be done.

  • Options
    TetromibiTetromibi Posts: 944 ✭✭✭✭✭

    eBay has gotten insanely tight with removing feedback over the last 6 months or so. Very hard to do so without the buyer blatantly violating ebay policies. There's a handful of cases where it's still easy to have removed, but it's not as easy as it used to be.

    Ship the coin(s) with tracking and call it a day. I'd have shipped without second thought. I also don't waste time googling every buyer.

    **Ultimately, if tracking shows delivered, ebay will have your back. This is one of the few situations where they will protect you. **

    Seller performance and feedback aren't the same thing, so I'd be surprised if you're able to have the feedback removed based on the situation and the chat transcript.

  • Options
    mbogomanmbogoman Posts: 5,126 ✭✭✭✭✭
    edited April 3, 2024 5:31AM

    Next time, ship him an empty package. He will file a claim. You can then refund him. You still have the coins, and you have followed Ebay's rules, so you won't get permanently dinged.

    Actually, the better route is to do the "I lost it" claim. It's been used on many of us much to our frustration.

  • Options
    ConnecticoinConnecticoin Posts: 12,542 ✭✭✭✭✭

    @jmlanzaf said:
    People just make their own problems with this paranoia. I do 2000+ transactions on ebay every year and the only problems are 1 or 2 delivery problems per year.

    This. I have 30 day free returns to get the fee discount - the fees I save far outweigh the very few returns I have. My “formula” is decent pictures and accurate descriptions (including descriptions of problems).

  • Options
    jmlanzafjmlanzaf Posts: 31,984 ✭✭✭✭✭

    @mbogoman said:
    Next time, ship him an empty package. He will file a claim. You can then refund him. You still have the coins, and you have followed Ebay's rules, so you won't get permanently dinged.

    Actually, the better route is to do the "I lost it" claim. It's been used on many of us much to our frustration.

    Why isn't the better route just to complete the sale? This is the second post in the last two weeks from someone who just cancels sales because they are "suspicious". eBay expects and essentially requires that sales be completed. If someone is so untrusting, maybe they should just consign coins to an auction house and then forget about it. If you are going to sell them yourself, you have to have a certain level of trust and professionalism.

  • Options
    CoinscratchCoinscratch Posts: 7,936 ✭✭✭✭✭

    I recently had a customer claim their package never arrived. I didn’t do anything and eventually eBay cancelled their claim.

  • Options
    logger7logger7 Posts: 8,091 ✭✭✭✭✭

    @jmlanzaf said:

    @mbogoman said:
    Next time, ship him an empty package. He will file a claim. You can then refund him. You still have the coins, and you have followed Ebay's rules, so you won't get permanently dinged.

    Actually, the better route is to do the "I lost it" claim. It's been used on many of us much to our frustration.

    Why isn't the better route just to complete the sale? This is the second post in the last two weeks from someone who just cancels sales because they are "suspicious". eBay expects and essentially requires that sales be completed. If someone is so untrusting, maybe they should just consign coins to an auction house and then forget about it. If you are going to sell them yourself, you have to have a certain level of trust and professionalism.

    This is the first sale I've cancelled in a long time on my own volition so you are misinformed or misread a prior post. Anyone googling "Inex" would see a lot of alarming feedback from ebay sellers.

  • Options
    JBKJBK Posts: 14,781 ✭✭✭✭✭

    @logger7 said:

    @jmlanzaf said:

    @mbogoman said:
    Next time, ship him an empty package. He will file a claim. You can then refund him. You still have the coins, and you have followed Ebay's rules, so you won't get permanently dinged.

    Actually, the better route is to do the "I lost it" claim. It's been used on many of us much to our frustration.

    Why isn't the better route just to complete the sale? This is the second post in the last two weeks from someone who just cancels sales because they are "suspicious". eBay expects and essentially requires that sales be completed. If someone is so untrusting, maybe they should just consign coins to an auction house and then forget about it. If you are going to sell them yourself, you have to have a certain level of trust and professionalism.

    This is the first sale I've cancelled in a long time on my own volition so you are misinformed or misread a prior post. Anyone googling "Inex" would see a lot of alarming feedback from ebay sellers.

    OK you made me do it.

    It seems the address is at best a forwarding agent. That allows overseas bidders to circumvent any seller policies about domestic-only sales.

    At worst, it's an outright scam, providing enough uncertainty that a buyer can plausibly claim non-receipt.

    Since ebay no longer allows sellers to leave negative feedback for buyers it is difficult to track scammers, but if a high level of non-receipt claims was still visible in their feedback then it must be pretty extreme.

  • Options
    yspsalesyspsales Posts: 2,223 ✭✭✭✭✭
    edited April 3, 2024 8:36AM

    You did your due diligence.... don't sweat the transaction.

    Be respectful and factual in your reply to any neg.

    Move on.

    BST: KindaNewish (3/21/21), WQuarterFreddie (3/30/21), Meltdown (4/6/21), DBSTrader2 (5/5/21) AKA- unclemonkey on Blow Out

  • Options
    oih82w8oih82w8 Posts: 11,905 ✭✭✭✭✭

    You are rolling the dice and taking your chances with ebay auctions. If you want a certain amount do a Buy It Now listing.

    oih82w8 = Oh I Hate To Wait _defectus patientia_aka...Dr. Defecto - Curator of RMO's

    BST transactions: dbldie55, jayPem, 78saen, UltraHighRelief, nibanny, liefgold, FallGuy, lkeigwin, mbogoman, Sandman70gt, keets, joeykoins, ianrussell (@GC), EagleEye, ThePennyLady, GRANDAM, Ilikecolor, Gluggo, okiedude, Voyageur, LJenkins11, fastfreddie, ms70, pursuitofliberty, ZoidMeister,Coin Finder, GotTheBug, edwardjulio, Coinnmore...
  • Options
    logger7logger7 Posts: 8,091 ✭✭✭✭✭

    @JBK said:

    @logger7 said:

    @jmlanzaf said:

    @mbogoman said:
    Next time, ship him an empty package. He will file a claim. You can then refund him. You still have the coins, and you have followed Ebay's rules, so you won't get permanently dinged.

    Actually, the better route is to do the "I lost it" claim. It's been used on many of us much to our frustration.

    Why isn't the better route just to complete the sale? This is the second post in the last two weeks from someone who just cancels sales because they are "suspicious". eBay expects and essentially requires that sales be completed. If someone is so untrusting, maybe they should just consign coins to an auction house and then forget about it. If you are going to sell them yourself, you have to have a certain level of trust and professionalism.

    This is the first sale I've cancelled in a long time on my own volition so you are misinformed or misread a prior post. Anyone googling "Inex" would see a lot of alarming feedback from ebay sellers.

    OK you made me do it.

    It seems the address is at best a forwarding agent. That allows overseas bidders to circumvent any seller policies about domestic-only sales.

    At worst, it's an outright scam, providing enough uncertainty that a buyer can plausibly claim non-receipt.

    Since ebay no longer allows sellers to leave negative feedback for buyers it is difficult to track scammers, but if a high level of non-receipt claims was still visible in their feedback then it must be pretty extreme.

    And as you can see the reshipper shows logistics for items they are sending from Delaware to the country of Georgia: https://www.inex.ge/en Usually with buyers out of the country where items are sent ebay global, you have protections, in this case not so much.

  • Options
    TetromibiTetromibi Posts: 944 ✭✭✭✭✭

    @logger7 said:

    @JBK said:

    @logger7 said:

    @jmlanzaf said:

    @mbogoman said:
    Next time, ship him an empty package. He will file a claim. You can then refund him. You still have the coins, and you have followed Ebay's rules, so you won't get permanently dinged.

    Actually, the better route is to do the "I lost it" claim. It's been used on many of us much to our frustration.

    Why isn't the better route just to complete the sale? This is the second post in the last two weeks from someone who just cancels sales because they are "suspicious". eBay expects and essentially requires that sales be completed. If someone is so untrusting, maybe they should just consign coins to an auction house and then forget about it. If you are going to sell them yourself, you have to have a certain level of trust and professionalism.

    This is the first sale I've cancelled in a long time on my own volition so you are misinformed or misread a prior post. Anyone googling "Inex" would see a lot of alarming feedback from ebay sellers.

    OK you made me do it.

    It seems the address is at best a forwarding agent. That allows overseas bidders to circumvent any seller policies about domestic-only sales.

    At worst, it's an outright scam, providing enough uncertainty that a buyer can plausibly claim non-receipt.

    Since ebay no longer allows sellers to leave negative feedback for buyers it is difficult to track scammers, but if a high level of non-receipt claims was still visible in their feedback then it must be pretty extreme.

    And as you can see the reshipper shows logistics for items they are sending from Delaware to the country of Georgia: https://www.inex.ge/en Usually with buyers out of the country where items are sent ebay global, you have protections, in this case not so much.

    In this case you have even more protection. Using a freight forwarder voids any eBay buyer protections…

  • Options
    logger7logger7 Posts: 8,091 ✭✭✭✭✭

    @Tetromibi said:

    @logger7 said:

    @JBK said:

    @logger7 said:

    @jmlanzaf said:

    @mbogoman said:
    Next time, ship him an empty package. He will file a claim. You can then refund him. You still have the coins, and you have followed Ebay's rules, so you won't get permanently dinged.

    Actually, the better route is to do the "I lost it" claim. It's been used on many of us much to our frustration.

    Why isn't the better route just to complete the sale? This is the second post in the last two weeks from someone who just cancels sales because they are "suspicious". eBay expects and essentially requires that sales be completed. If someone is so untrusting, maybe they should just consign coins to an auction house and then forget about it. If you are going to sell them yourself, you have to have a certain level of trust and professionalism.

    This is the first sale I've cancelled in a long time on my own volition so you are misinformed or misread a prior post. Anyone googling "Inex" would see a lot of alarming feedback from ebay sellers.

    OK you made me do it.

    It seems the address is at best a forwarding agent. That allows overseas bidders to circumvent any seller policies about domestic-only sales.

    At worst, it's an outright scam, providing enough uncertainty that a buyer can plausibly claim non-receipt.

    Since ebay no longer allows sellers to leave negative feedback for buyers it is difficult to track scammers, but if a high level of non-receipt claims was still visible in their feedback then it must be pretty extreme.

    And as you can see the reshipper shows logistics for items they are sending from Delaware to the country of Georgia: https://www.inex.ge/en Usually with buyers out of the country where items are sent ebay global, you have protections, in this case not so much.

    In this case you have even more protection. Using a freight forwarder voids any eBay buyer protections…

    Then why are there so many ebay sellers that have been scammed by them? And after numerous years of this reshipper operating with lots of complaints ebay, made aware of the situation, does nothing?

  • Options
    TetromibiTetromibi Posts: 944 ✭✭✭✭✭

    @logger7 said:

    @Tetromibi said:

    @logger7 said:

    @JBK said:

    @logger7 said:

    @jmlanzaf said:

    @mbogoman said:
    Next time, ship him an empty package. He will file a claim. You can then refund him. You still have the coins, and you have followed Ebay's rules, so you won't get permanently dinged.

    Actually, the better route is to do the "I lost it" claim. It's been used on many of us much to our frustration.

    Why isn't the better route just to complete the sale? This is the second post in the last two weeks from someone who just cancels sales because they are "suspicious". eBay expects and essentially requires that sales be completed. If someone is so untrusting, maybe they should just consign coins to an auction house and then forget about it. If you are going to sell them yourself, you have to have a certain level of trust and professionalism.

    This is the first sale I've cancelled in a long time on my own volition so you are misinformed or misread a prior post. Anyone googling "Inex" would see a lot of alarming feedback from ebay sellers.

    OK you made me do it.

    It seems the address is at best a forwarding agent. That allows overseas bidders to circumvent any seller policies about domestic-only sales.

    At worst, it's an outright scam, providing enough uncertainty that a buyer can plausibly claim non-receipt.

    Since ebay no longer allows sellers to leave negative feedback for buyers it is difficult to track scammers, but if a high level of non-receipt claims was still visible in their feedback then it must be pretty extreme.

    And as you can see the reshipper shows logistics for items they are sending from Delaware to the country of Georgia: https://www.inex.ge/en Usually with buyers out of the country where items are sent ebay global, you have protections, in this case not so much.

    In this case you have even more protection. Using a freight forwarder voids any eBay buyer protections…

    Then why are there so many ebay sellers that have been scammed by them? And after numerous years of this reshipper operating with lots of complaints ebay, made aware of the situation, does nothing?

    Why doesn’t eBay boot the buyers that leave perpetual negatives? Why doesn’t eBay boot the buyers that endlessly retract bids and manipulate auction results?

    Everything ebay does is what their research shows them will make them the most money.

    In the case of the freight forwarder, sure maybe a dozen or however many buyers under that address try things….but maybe that forwarder does millions in successful business that has ebay turning a blind eye.

    I don’t know all the details, but I’m not scared of completing transactions and will not waste time researching every buyer. Can’t get any business done that way.

    eBay wants the buyers to be happy and continue spending money there.

    I’d be pissed and leave a negative if you cancelled my transaction for no reason too.

  • Options
    JBKJBK Posts: 14,781 ✭✭✭✭✭

    @Tetromibi said:

    @logger7 said:

    @JBK said:

    @logger7 said:

    @jmlanzaf said:

    @mbogoman said:
    Next time, ship him an empty package. He will file a claim. You can then refund him. You still have the coins, and you have followed Ebay's rules, so you won't get permanently dinged.

    Actually, the better route is to do the "I lost it" claim. It's been used on many of us much to our frustration.

    Why isn't the better route just to complete the sale? This is the second post in the last two weeks from someone who just cancels sales because they are "suspicious". eBay expects and essentially requires that sales be completed. If someone is so untrusting, maybe they should just consign coins to an auction house and then forget about it. If you are going to sell them yourself, you have to have a certain level of trust and professionalism.

    This is the first sale I've cancelled in a long time on my own volition so you are misinformed or misread a prior post. Anyone googling "Inex" would see a lot of alarming feedback from ebay sellers.

    OK you made me do it.

    It seems the address is at best a forwarding agent. That allows overseas bidders to circumvent any seller policies about domestic-only sales.

    At worst, it's an outright scam, providing enough uncertainty that a buyer can plausibly claim non-receipt.

    Since ebay no longer allows sellers to leave negative feedback for buyers it is difficult to track scammers, but if a high level of non-receipt claims was still visible in their feedback then it must be pretty extreme.

    And as you can see the reshipper shows logistics for items they are sending from Delaware to the country of Georgia: https://www.inex.ge/en Usually with buyers out of the country where items are sent ebay global, you have protections, in this case not so much.

    In this case you have even more protection. Using a freight forwarder voids any eBay buyer protections…

    That is true.

    However, the buyer can still do a credit card charge back, I believe.

  • Options
    logger7logger7 Posts: 8,091 ✭✭✭✭✭
    edited April 3, 2024 1:06PM

    @Tetromibi said:

    @logger7 said:

    @Tetromibi said:

    @logger7 said:

    @JBK said:

    @logger7 said:

    @jmlanzaf said:

    @mbogoman said:
    Next time, ship him an empty package. He will file a claim. You can then refund him. You still have the coins, and you have followed Ebay's rules, so you won't get permanently dinged.

    Actually, the better route is to do the "I lost it" claim. It's been used on many of us much to our frustration.

    Why isn't the better route just to complete the sale? This is the second post in the last two weeks from someone who just cancels sales because they are "suspicious". eBay expects and essentially requires that sales be completed. If someone is so untrusting, maybe they should just consign coins to an auction house and then forget about it. If you are going to sell them yourself, you have to have a certain level of trust and professionalism.

    This is the first sale I've cancelled in a long time on my own volition so you are misinformed or misread a prior post. Anyone googling "Inex" would see a lot of alarming feedback from ebay sellers.

    OK you made me do it.

    It seems the address is at best a forwarding agent. That allows overseas bidders to circumvent any seller policies about domestic-only sales.

    At worst, it's an outright scam, providing enough uncertainty that a buyer can plausibly claim non-receipt.

    Since ebay no longer allows sellers to leave negative feedback for buyers it is difficult to track scammers, but if a high level of non-receipt claims was still visible in their feedback then it must be pretty extreme.

    And as you can see the reshipper shows logistics for items they are sending from Delaware to the country of Georgia: https://www.inex.ge/en Usually with buyers out of the country where items are sent ebay global, you have protections, in this case not so much.

    In this case you have even more protection. Using a freight forwarder voids any eBay buyer protections…

    Then why are there so many ebay sellers that have been scammed by them? And after numerous years of this reshipper operating with lots of complaints ebay, made aware of the situation, does nothing?

    I don’t know all the details, but I’m not scared of completing transactions and will not waste time researching every buyer. Can’t get any business done that way.

    eBay wants the buyers to be happy and continue spending money there.

    I’d be pissed and leave a negative if you cancelled my transaction for no reason too.

    Or ebay sellers who got scammed got no recourse, why else would a hundred sellers go to the corporate site that was the source of the scam and warn other prospective sellers?

    What is "suspicious" is an address where you are shipping to a corporation. Maybe the likelihood of having a problem transaction is not high but it happens. And identifying a reshipper address as "problem with this address" is the right thing to do not chasing the buck wherever it can be had.

    They've found a way to circumvent the identification of foreign addresses without ebay flagging them.

  • Options
    TetromibiTetromibi Posts: 944 ✭✭✭✭✭

    @logger7 said:

    @Tetromibi said:

    @logger7 said:

    @Tetromibi said:

    @logger7 said:

    @JBK said:

    @logger7 said:

    @jmlanzaf said:

    @mbogoman said:
    Next time, ship him an empty package. He will file a claim. You can then refund him. You still have the coins, and you have followed Ebay's rules, so you won't get permanently dinged.

    Actually, the better route is to do the "I lost it" claim. It's been used on many of us much to our frustration.

    Why isn't the better route just to complete the sale? This is the second post in the last two weeks from someone who just cancels sales because they are "suspicious". eBay expects and essentially requires that sales be completed. If someone is so untrusting, maybe they should just consign coins to an auction house and then forget about it. If you are going to sell them yourself, you have to have a certain level of trust and professionalism.

    This is the first sale I've cancelled in a long time on my own volition so you are misinformed or misread a prior post. Anyone googling "Inex" would see a lot of alarming feedback from ebay sellers.

    OK you made me do it.

    It seems the address is at best a forwarding agent. That allows overseas bidders to circumvent any seller policies about domestic-only sales.

    At worst, it's an outright scam, providing enough uncertainty that a buyer can plausibly claim non-receipt.

    Since ebay no longer allows sellers to leave negative feedback for buyers it is difficult to track scammers, but if a high level of non-receipt claims was still visible in their feedback then it must be pretty extreme.

    And as you can see the reshipper shows logistics for items they are sending from Delaware to the country of Georgia: https://www.inex.ge/en Usually with buyers out of the country where items are sent ebay global, you have protections, in this case not so much.

    In this case you have even more protection. Using a freight forwarder voids any eBay buyer protections…

    Then why are there so many ebay sellers that have been scammed by them? And after numerous years of this reshipper operating with lots of complaints ebay, made aware of the situation, does nothing?

    I don’t know all the details, but I’m not scared of completing transactions and will not waste time researching every buyer. Can’t get any business done that way.

    eBay wants the buyers to be happy and continue spending money there.

    I’d be pissed and leave a negative if you cancelled my transaction for no reason too.

    Or ebay sellers who got scammed got no recourse, why else would a hundred sellers go to the corporate site that was the source of the scam and warn other prospective sellers?

    What is "suspicious" is an address where you are shipping to a corporation. Maybe the likelihood of having a problem transaction is not high but it happens. And identifying a reshipper address as "problem with this address" is the right thing to do not chasing the buck wherever it can be had.

    They've found a way to circumvent the identification of foreign addresses without ebay flagging them.

    eBay is well aware of freight forwarders. There’s a number of massive operations in Oregon, Florida, and New England in particular. Nothing suspicious about that, and I haven’t seen anything saying it’s against any policies.

    Bad apples are gonna try to scam anyway they can. The flip side is if you’re doing business you need to understand your protections.

    You can be paranoid all you want, but if you cancel too often for this type of stuff, your account will the one in jeopardy. This applies to both feedback that customers review as well as your seller metrics which will affect search placement (I’ve been told in some cases they will even hide your results when below standard.)

  • Options
    jmlanzafjmlanzaf Posts: 31,984 ✭✭✭✭✭

    @logger7 said:

    @jmlanzaf said:

    @mbogoman said:
    Next time, ship him an empty package. He will file a claim. You can then refund him. You still have the coins, and you have followed Ebay's rules, so you won't get permanently dinged.

    Actually, the better route is to do the "I lost it" claim. It's been used on many of us much to our frustration.

    Why isn't the better route just to complete the sale? This is the second post in the last two weeks from someone who just cancels sales because they are "suspicious". eBay expects and essentially requires that sales be completed. If someone is so untrusting, maybe they should just consign coins to an auction house and then forget about it. If you are going to sell them yourself, you have to have a certain level of trust and professionalism.

    This is the first sale I've cancelled in a long time on my own volition so you are misinformed or misread a prior post. Anyone googling "Inex" would see a lot of alarming feedback from ebay sellers.

    No, you misread my post. I didn't say that you had posted this problem twice. The first instance of that came from "someone" else.

  • Options
    jmlanzafjmlanzaf Posts: 31,984 ✭✭✭✭✭
    edited April 3, 2024 3:39PM

    @Tetromibi said:

    @logger7 said:

    @Tetromibi said:

    @logger7 said:

    @Tetromibi said:

    @logger7 said:

    @JBK said:

    @logger7 said:

    @jmlanzaf said:

    @mbogoman said:
    Next time, ship him an empty package. He will file a claim. You can then refund him. You still have the coins, and you have followed Ebay's rules, so you won't get permanently dinged.

    Actually, the better route is to do the "I lost it" claim. It's been used on many of us much to our frustration.

    Why isn't the better route just to complete the sale? This is the second post in the last two weeks from someone who just cancels sales because they are "suspicious". eBay expects and essentially requires that sales be completed. If someone is so untrusting, maybe they should just consign coins to an auction house and then forget about it. If you are going to sell them yourself, you have to have a certain level of trust and professionalism.

    This is the first sale I've cancelled in a long time on my own volition so you are misinformed or misread a prior post. Anyone googling "Inex" would see a lot of alarming feedback from ebay sellers.

    OK you made me do it.

    It seems the address is at best a forwarding agent. That allows overseas bidders to circumvent any seller policies about domestic-only sales.

    At worst, it's an outright scam, providing enough uncertainty that a buyer can plausibly claim non-receipt.

    Since ebay no longer allows sellers to leave negative feedback for buyers it is difficult to track scammers, but if a high level of non-receipt claims was still visible in their feedback then it must be pretty extreme.

    And as you can see the reshipper shows logistics for items they are sending from Delaware to the country of Georgia: https://www.inex.ge/en Usually with buyers out of the country where items are sent ebay global, you have protections, in this case not so much.

    In this case you have even more protection. Using a freight forwarder voids any eBay buyer protections…

    Then why are there so many ebay sellers that have been scammed by them? And after numerous years of this reshipper operating with lots of complaints ebay, made aware of the situation, does nothing?

    I don’t know all the details, but I’m not scared of completing transactions and will not waste time researching every buyer. Can’t get any business done that way.

    eBay wants the buyers to be happy and continue spending money there.

    I’d be pissed and leave a negative if you cancelled my transaction for no reason too.

    Or ebay sellers who got scammed got no recourse, why else would a hundred sellers go to the corporate site that was the source of the scam and warn other prospective sellers?

    What is "suspicious" is an address where you are shipping to a corporation. Maybe the likelihood of having a problem transaction is not high but it happens. And identifying a reshipper address as "problem with this address" is the right thing to do not chasing the buck wherever it can be had.

    They've found a way to circumvent the identification of foreign addresses without ebay flagging them.

    eBay is well aware of freight forwarders. There’s a number of massive operations in Oregon, Florida, and New England in particular. Nothing suspicious about that, and I haven’t seen anything saying it’s against any policies.

    Bad apples are gonna try to scam anyway they can. The flip side is if you’re doing business you need to understand your protections.

    You can be paranoid all you want, but if you cancel too often for this type of stuff, your account will the one in jeopardy. This applies to both feedback that customers review as well as your seller metrics which will affect search placement (I’ve been told in some cases they will even hide your results when below standard.)

    Agree. I've shipped to numerous forwarders without incidence. I'm, frankly, grateful for them as my shipping rate is then domestic rather than international.

    I still stand by the simple advice: if you are that paranoid that you feel the need to research every buyer, perhaps eBay isn't the right venue for you. [That's a generic "you", not intended to be directly aimed at the OP.]

  • Options
    Slade01Slade01 Posts: 42 ✭✭

    @oih82w8 said:
    You are rolling the dice and taking your chances with eBay auctions. If you want a certain amount do a Buy It Now listing.

    Interesting, I just started doing auctions this week with about 20 Morgans and some modern gold (the earlier American Eagle 4 coin sets), I always ship with signature and insurance but we'll see how it goes.

  • Options
    WalkerloverWalkerlover Posts: 713 ✭✭✭✭

    @mbogoman said:
    Next time, ship him an empty package. He will file a claim. You can then refund him. You still have the coins, and you have followed Ebay's rules, so you won't get permanently dinged.

    Actually, the better route is to do the "I lost it" claim. It's been used on many of us much to our frustration.

    I think you can also claim you had the coin on consignment and it got sold. I haven’t done this but it seems like a reasonable way out of a sale

  • Options

    @Slade01 said:

    @oih82w8 said:
    You are rolling the dice and taking your chances with eBay auctions. If you want a certain amount do a Buy It Now listing.

    Interesting, I just started doing auctions this week with about 20 Morgans and some modern gold (the earlier American Eagle 4 coin sets), I always ship with signature and insurance but we'll see how it goes.

    Just be sure you are not using the eBay default Ship Cover insurance as coins are excluded from that service.

  • Options
    logger7logger7 Posts: 8,091 ✭✭✭✭✭
    edited April 3, 2024 6:19PM

    @jmlanzaf said:

    @Tetromibi said:

    @logger7 said:

    @Tetromibi said:

    @logger7 said:

    @Tetromibi said:

    @logger7 said:

    @JBK said:

    @logger7 said:

    @jmlanzaf said:

    @mbogoman said:
    Next time, ship him an empty package. He will file a claim. You can then refund him. You still have the coins, and you have followed Ebay's rules, so you won't get permanently dinged.

    Actually, the better route is to do the "I lost it" claim. It's been used on many of us much to our frustration.

    Why isn't the better route just to complete the sale? This is the second post in the last two weeks from someone who just cancels sales because they are "suspicious". eBay expects and essentially requires that sales be completed. If someone is so untrusting, maybe they should just consign coins to an auction house and then forget about it. If you are going to sell them yourself, you have to have a certain level of trust and professionalism.

    This is the first sale I've cancelled in a long time on my own volition so you are misinformed or misread a prior post. Anyone googling "Inex" would see a lot of alarming feedback from ebay sellers.

    OK you made me do it.

    It seems the address is at best a forwarding agent. That allows overseas bidders to circumvent any seller policies about domestic-only sales.

    At worst, it's an outright scam, providing enough uncertainty that a buyer can plausibly claim non-receipt.

    Since ebay no longer allows sellers to leave negative feedback for buyers it is difficult to track scammers, but if a high level of non-receipt claims was still visible in their feedback then it must be pretty extreme.

    And as you can see the reshipper shows logistics for items they are sending from Delaware to the country of Georgia: https://www.inex.ge/en Usually with buyers out of the country where items are sent ebay global, you have protections, in this case not so much.

    In this case you have even more protection. Using a freight forwarder voids any eBay buyer protections…

    Then why are there so many ebay sellers that have been scammed by them? And after numerous years of this reshipper operating with lots of complaints ebay, made aware of the situation, does nothing?

    I don’t know all the details, but I’m not scared of completing transactions and will not waste time researching every buyer. Can’t get any business done that way.

    eBay wants the buyers to be happy and continue spending money there.

    I’d be pissed and leave a negative if you cancelled my transaction for no reason too.

    Or ebay sellers who got scammed got no recourse, why else would a hundred sellers go to the corporate site that was the source of the scam and warn other prospective sellers?

    What is "suspicious" is an address where you are shipping to a corporation. Maybe the likelihood of having a problem transaction is not high but it happens. And identifying a reshipper address as "problem with this address" is the right thing to do not chasing the buck wherever it can be had.

    They've found a way to circumvent the identification of foreign addresses without ebay flagging them.

    eBay is well aware of freight forwarders. There’s a number of massive operations in Oregon, Florida, and New England in particular. Nothing suspicious about that, and I haven’t seen anything saying it’s against any policies.

    Bad apples are gonna try to scam anyway they can. The flip side is if you’re doing business you need to understand your protections.

    You can be paranoid all you want, but if you cancel too often for this type of stuff, your account will the one in jeopardy. This applies to both feedback that customers review as well as your seller metrics which will affect search placement (I’ve been told in some cases they will even hide your results when below standard.)

    Agree. I've shipped to numerous forwarders without incidence. I'm, frankly, grateful for them as my shipping rate is then domestic rather than international.

    I still stand by the simple advice: if you are that paranoid that you feel the need to research every buyer, perhaps eBay isn't the right venue for you. [That's a generic "you", not intended to be directly aimed at the OP.]

    Or if you turn it around never know who your customer is. And usually I don't pay attention to the address. Setting aside the hateful and abusive use of the term "paranoid", paying attention to destinations is a part of personal responsibility. And dismissing the word of ebay customer service as having no weight whatsoever raises other questions, when I ask numerous times of the representative if identifying what looked like a problem address whether cancelling the sale was or was not permissible, and they did everything they could to assure me that I should go ahead and cancel and they would back me.

  • Options
    jmlanzafjmlanzaf Posts: 31,984 ✭✭✭✭✭

    @Walkerlover said:

    @mbogoman said:
    Next time, ship him an empty package. He will file a claim. You can then refund him. You still have the coins, and you have followed Ebay's rules, so you won't get permanently dinged.

    Actually, the better route is to do the "I lost it" claim. It's been used on many of us much to our frustration.

    I think you can also claim you had the coin on consignment and it got sold. I haven’t done this but it seems like a reasonable way out of a sale

    Neither within ebay rules nor professional.

    I really don't ever want to see anyone complain about a canceled sale again, since y'all approve of the practice.

Leave a Comment

BoldItalicStrikethroughOrdered listUnordered list
Emoji
Image
Align leftAlign centerAlign rightToggle HTML viewToggle full pageToggle lights
Drop image/file