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Likely unique Walking Liberty Half Plaster in upcoming StacksBowers Auction

ByersByers Posts: 1,477 ✭✭✭✭✭

A likely unique plaster is crossing the auction block. A fascinating part of the coin design process and pedigreed to the designer of this coin. ( not mine)

https://auctions.stacksbowers.com/lots/view/3-18C1WH/plaster-of-adolph-alexander-weinmans-second-1916-walking-liberty-half-dollar-obverse-design-cf-judd-1992-pollock-2053-and-judd-1993-

mikebyers.com Dealer in Major Mint Errors, Die Trials & Patterns - Author of NLG Best World Coin Book World's Greatest Mint Errors - Publisher & Editor of minterrornews.com.
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    7Jaguars7Jaguars Posts: 7,266 ✭✭✭✭✭

    @Byers said:
    A likely unique plaster is crossing the auction block. A fascinating part of the coin design process and pedigreed to the designer of this coin. ( not mine)

    https://auctions.stacksbowers.com/lots/view/3-18C1WH/plaster-of-adolph-alexander-weinmans-second-1916-walking-liberty-half-dollar-obverse-design-cf-judd-1992-pollock-2053-and-judd-1993-

    Calling Dan Carr - can you please "adapt" this design Sir?

    Love that Milled British (1830-1960)
    Well, just Love coins, period.
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    Walkerguy21DWalkerguy21D Posts: 11,150 ✭✭✭✭✭

    Very cool, thanks for posting this!

    Successful BST transactions with 170 members. Recent: Tonedeaf, Shane6596, Piano1, Ikenefic, RG, PCGSPhoto, stman, Don'tTelltheWife, Boosibri, Ron1968, snowequities, VTchaser, jrt103, SurfinxHI, 78saen, bp777, FHC, RYK, JTHawaii, Opportunity, Kliao, bigtime36, skanderbeg, split37, thebigeng, acloco, Toninginthblood, OKCC, braddick, Coinflip, robcool, fastfreddie, tightbudget, DBSTrader2, nickelsciolist, relaxn, Eagle eye, soldi, silverman68, ElKevvo, sawyerjosh, Schmitz7, talkingwalnut2, konsole, sharkman987, sniocsu, comma, jesbroken, David1234, biosolar, Sullykerry, Moldnut, erwindoc, MichaelDixon, GotTheBug
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    WalkerfanWalkerfan Posts: 8,974 ✭✭✭✭✭
    edited March 21, 2024 9:27AM

    What an important piece of Walker numismatic history! Very cool!! 😎

    Edit to add: Though I don't think I'd buy one, as I prefer coins, and I DO see it going for strong money, too.

    “I may not believe in myself but I believe in what I’m doing” ~Jimmy Page~

    My Full Walker Registry Set (1916-1947)

    https://www.ngccoin.com/registry/competitive-sets/16292/

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    MrEurekaMrEureka Posts: 23,945 ✭✭✭✭✭

    @Byers said:
    A likely unique plaster is crossing the auction block. A fascinating part of the coin design process and pedigreed to the designer of this coin. ( not mine)

    What do we actually know about the provenance?

    Andy Lustig

    Doggedly collecting coins of the Central American Republic.

    Visit the Society of US Pattern Collectors at USPatterns.com.
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    EbeneezerEbeneezer Posts: 264 ✭✭✭

    The actual term is galvano, and these rarely cross the auction block. So I see it going for some solid money.

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    MsMorrisineMsMorrisine Posts: 32,218 ✭✭✭✭✭

    it made it to SB, but i'd be too paranoid to buy this because of shipping dangers

    how can these be safely transported?

    Current maintainer of Stone's Master List of Favorite Websites // My BST transactions
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    ByersByers Posts: 1,477 ✭✭✭✭✭
    edited March 20, 2024 7:46PM

    @MsMorrisine said:
    it made it to SB, but i'd be too paranoid to buy this because of shipping dangers

    how can these be safely transported?

    I have handled several U.S. coin galvanos and plasters which were safely transported by the Post Office. These are usually wrapped in a box, which is then placed inside a larger box.

    mikebyers.com Dealer in Major Mint Errors, Die Trials & Patterns - Author of NLG Best World Coin Book World's Greatest Mint Errors - Publisher & Editor of minterrornews.com.
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    goodmoney4badmoneygoodmoney4badmoney Posts: 1,127 ✭✭✭✭

    That Buffalo is cool, especially the “Fraser” at the bottom.

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    MsMorrisineMsMorrisine Posts: 32,218 ✭✭✭✭✭

    i so want that buff

    Current maintainer of Stone's Master List of Favorite Websites // My BST transactions
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    ByersByers Posts: 1,477 ✭✭✭✭✭
    edited March 21, 2024 2:32AM

    @goodmoney4badmoney said:
    That Buffalo is cool, especially the “Fraser” at the bottom.

    James Fraser became famous for his Buffalo Nickel design. He also designed the reverse of the Oregon Trail Commemorative Half Dollar. The American Buffalo 24-karat bullion gold coin also has his Buffalo Nickel designs on the obverse and reverse.

    Laura Fraser ( his wife and equally as famous in her own right) designed the obverse of the Oregon Trail Half. Her officially adopted designs also include the 1921 Alabama Half Dollar, the 1922 Grant Gold Dollar and Half Dollar, and the 1925 Vancouver Half Dollar. Her design for the 1932 Washington Quarter was issued as the 1999 George Washington Commemorative Gold Five-Dollar coin, and her obverse design was used for the circulating quarter starting in 2022.

    mikebyers.com Dealer in Major Mint Errors, Die Trials & Patterns - Author of NLG Best World Coin Book World's Greatest Mint Errors - Publisher & Editor of minterrornews.com.
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    ByersByers Posts: 1,477 ✭✭✭✭✭

    A plaster is the model made during the design process of a coin or medal. They are sculpted in a much larger size than the actual size of the final coin or medal. Plaster casts can be positive or negative and the artist is able to add or carve additional detail. Plasters are often mounted on wood and become a very desirable wall hanging.

    A galvano is always one-sided and made by placing a bas-relief mold or pattern (of plaster, plastic or metal) in an electrolytic tank containing an electrolyte solution. Galvanos can be made positive or negative (provided the pattern is the opposite: a positive pattern makes a negative galvano). In the numismatic and medallic field negative galvanos are the form of pattern making of a bas-relief to be converted into a die. Galvano casts are often mounted on wood and become a very desirable wall hanging.

    mikebyers.com Dealer in Major Mint Errors, Die Trials & Patterns - Author of NLG Best World Coin Book World's Greatest Mint Errors - Publisher & Editor of minterrornews.com.
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    ctf_error_coinsctf_error_coins Posts: 15,433 ✭✭✭✭✭

    Thanks Mike for your very informative post.

    The pieces are a super cool part of our numismatic history.

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    MrEurekaMrEureka Posts: 23,945 ✭✭✭✭✭

    @Byers said:
    A plaster is the model made during the design process of a coin or medal. They are sculpted in a much larger size than the actual size of the final coin or medal. Plaster casts can be positive or negative and the artist is able to add or carve additional detail. Plasters are often mounted on wood and become a very desirable wall hanging.

    A galvano is always one-sided and made by placing a bas-relief mold or pattern (of plaster, plastic or metal) in an electrolytic tank containing an electrolyte solution. Galvanos can be made positive or negative (provided the pattern is the opposite: a positive pattern makes a negative galvano). In the numismatic and medallic field negative galvanos are the form of pattern making of a bas-relief to be converted into a die. Galvano casts are often mounted on wood and become a very desirable wall hanging.

    Is the carving ever actually done in plaster, or are plasters always taken from carvings in another material? I would have guessed the latter, just because plaster doesn't seem like it would be an ideal material for an original carving, but I really don't know.

    Andy Lustig

    Doggedly collecting coins of the Central American Republic.

    Visit the Society of US Pattern Collectors at USPatterns.com.
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    ByersByers Posts: 1,477 ✭✭✭✭✭

    Below are clay models of the obverse and reverse of the Indian Head nickel, sculpted by James Earle Fraser:

    mikebyers.com Dealer in Major Mint Errors, Die Trials & Patterns - Author of NLG Best World Coin Book World's Greatest Mint Errors - Publisher & Editor of minterrornews.com.
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    ByersByers Posts: 1,477 ✭✭✭✭✭
    edited March 21, 2024 11:23PM

    Also in this same StacksBowers Auction is one of two known silver U.S. Mint issued Congressional medals honoring Charles Lindbergh and designed by Laura Fraser!

    •The U.S. Mint struck ONE medal in gold which was presented to Lindbergh.

    •The Smithsonian Institute has ONE example in gilt bronze.

    •TWO specimens were struck in .999 fine silver with a sandblast finish and a weight of 5.77 troy ounces. One of these 2 is the StacksBowers medal offered in their auction.

    •Bronze versions were struck by the U.S. Mint for sale to collectors.

    •There is also ONE known 14 inch bronze galvano of the obverse design in private hands, designed and sculpted by Laura Fraser. This unique galvano was discovered in her estate.

    https://auctions.stacksbowers.com/lots/view/3-18DEG0/1928-congressional-medal-for-charles-lindbergh-by-laura-gardin-fraser-failor-hayden-645-silver-specimen-67-pcgs

    mikebyers.com Dealer in Major Mint Errors, Die Trials & Patterns - Author of NLG Best World Coin Book World's Greatest Mint Errors - Publisher & Editor of minterrornews.com.
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    MrEurekaMrEureka Posts: 23,945 ✭✭✭✭✭

    @Byers said:
    Below are clay models of the obverse and reverse of the Indian Head nickel, sculpted by James Earle Fraser:

    Interesting. I don’t recall seeing any clay models, of Buffalos or of anything else. And I wonder how durable clay would be after a century on the shelf. Actually, I don’t even know what century old clay would look like. Are you sure the above is clay and not plaster?

    Andy Lustig

    Doggedly collecting coins of the Central American Republic.

    Visit the Society of US Pattern Collectors at USPatterns.com.
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    BLUEJAYWAYBLUEJAYWAY Posts: 8,034 ✭✭✭✭✭

    Lots of interesting history posted here.

    Successful transactions:Tookybandit. "Everyone is equal, some are more equal than others".
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    DCWDCW Posts: 6,975 ✭✭✭✭✭

    @MrEureka said:

    @Byers said:
    Below are clay models of the obverse and reverse of the Indian Head nickel, sculpted by James Earle Fraser:

    Interesting. I don’t recall seeing any clay models, of Buffalos or of anything else. And I wonder how durable clay would be after a century on the shelf. Actually, I don’t even know what century old clay would look like. Are you sure the above is clay and not plaster?

    Maybe it is "fired" like pottery to harden it? Like you say, I can't imagine clay retaining its form after a Century. My kids' play doh doesn't hold up very well.

    Dead Cat Waltz Exonumia
    "Coin collecting for outcasts..."

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    ByersByers Posts: 1,477 ✭✭✭✭✭
    edited March 22, 2024 6:05AM

    @MrEureka said:

    @Byers said:
    Below are clay models of the obverse and reverse of the Indian Head nickel, sculpted by James Earle Fraser:

    Interesting. I don’t recall seeing any clay models, of Buffalos or of anything else. And I wonder how durable clay would be after a century on the shelf. Actually, I don’t even know what century old clay would look like. Are you sure the above is clay and not plaster?

    Andy-

    100% clay. It was discovered in the Frasier Studio.

    There are AT LEAST 4 known clay models of the James Fraser Buffalo Nickel. 3 of them are listed below:

    •One resides in the
    Syracuse University Art Museum

    •One was displayed in 2008 by the Woodbridge Township NJ Historic Preservation Commission in an exhibit

    •One is displayed in the National Cowboy & Western Heritage Museum in Oklahoma

    I extensively researched clay, plasters and galvanos from both James and Laura Fraser that are in private museums and in public hands. This was based on documents, photographs, paperwork and actual models that I have in my possession from my purchase of part of their estate.

    mikebyers.com Dealer in Major Mint Errors, Die Trials & Patterns - Author of NLG Best World Coin Book World's Greatest Mint Errors - Publisher & Editor of minterrornews.com.
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    ByersByers Posts: 1,477 ✭✭✭✭✭

    Regarding the silver Charles Lindberg Medal posted above, being auctioned by StacksBowers (not mine):

    Here is the unique gold medal presented to Charles Lindberg:

    Below are images of the original box that is included in the auction lot of the silver medal. These images were not included in the StacksBowers auction catalog or online.



    mikebyers.com Dealer in Major Mint Errors, Die Trials & Patterns - Author of NLG Best World Coin Book World's Greatest Mint Errors - Publisher & Editor of minterrornews.com.
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    ctf_error_coinsctf_error_coins Posts: 15,433 ✭✭✭✭✭

    @Byers said:

    @MrEureka said:

    @Byers said:
    Below are clay models of the obverse and reverse of the Indian Head nickel, sculpted by James Earle Fraser:

    Interesting. I don’t recall seeing any clay models, of Buffalos or of anything else. And I wonder how durable clay would be after a century on the shelf. Actually, I don’t even know what century old clay would look like. Are you sure the above is clay and not plaster?

    Andy-

    100% clay. It was discovered in the Frasier Studio.

    There are AT LEAST 4 known clay models of the James Fraser Buffalo Nickel. 3 of them are listed below:

    •One resides in the
    Syracuse University Art Museum

    •One was displayed in 2008 by the Woodbridge Township NJ Historic Preservation Commission in an exhibit

    •One is displayed in the National Cowboy & Western Heritage Museum in Oklahoma

    I extensively researched clay, plasters and galvanos from both James and Laura Fraser that are in private museums and in public hands. This was based on documents, photographs, paperwork and actual models that I have in my possession from my purchase of part of their estate.

    Wow, you purchased Fraser Plasters from their estate?

    Very interesting and super cool.

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    ByersByers Posts: 1,477 ✭✭✭✭✭

    @ctf_error_coins said:

    Wow, you purchased Fraser Plasters from their estate?

    Very interesting and super cool.

    Chris- this galvano and plasters originally came from the Fraser estate. It’s always exciting to introduce new numismatic discoveries that dealers and collectors were not aware of.

    Mint Error News just published an article on the Laura Fraser designed Charles Lindberg medal…BRONZE GALVANO of the obverse design, which was unknown to the numismatic community. It is 14 inches in diameter and is unique in private hands.

    Additionally, it is the only known Laura Fraser galvano of a coin or medal design in private hands. The other known Fraser galvanos were created by her husband James Fraser.

    The galvano is also on the cover of the latest issue of Mint Error News which also features some of Laura Fraser’s plasters. These were unknown to the numismatic community.

    https://minterrornews.com/discoveries-3-2-24-lindbergh-obv-bronze-galvano-by-laura-gardin-fraser.html

    https://minterrornews.com/issue69.pdf

    mikebyers.com Dealer in Major Mint Errors, Die Trials & Patterns - Author of NLG Best World Coin Book World's Greatest Mint Errors - Publisher & Editor of minterrornews.com.
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    davewesendavewesen Posts: 5,853 ✭✭✭✭✭
    edited March 22, 2024 10:59AM

    How big are these things?

    the half says 167 mm so near 6.5" in diameter?
    the nickel says 101 mm inner near 4" and 25 mm rim near 1" more on each side?

    I ask because when I see the sculptors working on the designs, it looks closer to 12-15"

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    ByersByers Posts: 1,477 ✭✭✭✭✭

    The James B. Longacre's original wax models for the $3 gold piece from 1854 were always among my favorites and seemed like a bargain in the Heritage Auction…

    mikebyers.com Dealer in Major Mint Errors, Die Trials & Patterns - Author of NLG Best World Coin Book World's Greatest Mint Errors - Publisher & Editor of minterrornews.com.
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    ByersByers Posts: 1,477 ✭✭✭✭✭

    Here is the Charles A. Lindbergh 14-Inch Plaster of the Reverse Design for the 1928 Congressional Gold Medal by Laura Gardin Fraser

    And where it originated from!

    https://minterrornews.com/discoveries-3-2-24-lindbergh-rev-plaster-by-laura-gardin-fraser.html

    mikebyers.com Dealer in Major Mint Errors, Die Trials & Patterns - Author of NLG Best World Coin Book World's Greatest Mint Errors - Publisher & Editor of minterrornews.com.
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    MrEurekaMrEureka Posts: 23,945 ✭✭✭✭✭

    Z> @Byers said:

    @MrEureka said:

    @Byers said:
    Below are clay models of the obverse and reverse of the Indian Head nickel, sculpted by James Earle Fraser:

    Interesting. I don’t recall seeing any clay models, of Buffalos or of anything else. And I wonder how durable clay would be after a century on the shelf. Actually, I don’t even know what century old clay would look like. Are you sure the above is clay and not plaster?

    Andy-

    100% clay. It was discovered in the Frasier Studio.

    There are AT LEAST 4 known clay models of the James Fraser Buffalo Nickel. 3 of them are listed below:

    •One resides in the
    Syracuse University Art Museum

    •One was displayed in 2008 by the Woodbridge Township NJ Historic Preservation Commission in an exhibit

    •One is displayed in the National Cowboy & Western Heritage Museum in Oklahoma

    I extensively researched clay, plasters and galvanos from both James and Laura Fraser that are in private museums and in public hands. This was based on documents, photographs, paperwork and actual models that I have in my possession from my purchase of part of their estate.

    Are the 4 clay ones identical? If so, how would they have been produced?

    Andy Lustig

    Doggedly collecting coins of the Central American Republic.

    Visit the Society of US Pattern Collectors at USPatterns.com.
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    orevilleoreville Posts: 11,784 ✭✭✭✭✭

    Wow
    Wow
    Wow

    A Collectors Universe poster since 1997!
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    ByersByers Posts: 1,477 ✭✭✭✭✭
    edited March 22, 2024 8:08PM

    @davewesen said:
    How big are these things?

    the half says 167 mm so near 6.5" in diameter?
    the nickel says 101 mm inner near 4" and 25 mm rim near 1" more on each side?

    I ask because when I see the sculptors working on the designs, it looks closer to 12-15"

    I can’t comment on the sizes on the 2 (plaster and galvano) in the upcoming StacksBowers auction, but regarding the sizes of the James Fraser and Laura Fraser models that I have, the sizes vary from 6 inches to 15 inches.

    mikebyers.com Dealer in Major Mint Errors, Die Trials & Patterns - Author of NLG Best World Coin Book World's Greatest Mint Errors - Publisher & Editor of minterrornews.com.
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    dcarrdcarr Posts: 8,007 ✭✭✭✭✭

    @7Jaguars said:

    @Byers said:
    A likely unique plaster is crossing the auction block. A fascinating part of the coin design process and pedigreed to the designer of this coin. ( not mine)

    https://auctions.stacksbowers.com/lots/view/3-18C1WH/plaster-of-adolph-alexander-weinmans-second-1916-walking-liberty-half-dollar-obverse-design-cf-judd-1992-pollock-2053-and-judd-1993-

    Calling Dan Carr - can you please "adapt" this design Sir?

    .

    If the new buyer is willing to work with me on it, I could potentially make a die or dies from that plaster.

    .

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    dcarrdcarr Posts: 8,007 ✭✭✭✭✭

    @Ebeneezer said:
    The actual term is galvano, and these rarely cross the auction block. So I see it going for some solid money.

    The plaster version is not technically a "galvano". But a galvano can be made directly from a plaster.

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    dcarrdcarr Posts: 8,007 ✭✭✭✭✭

    @MrEureka said:

    @Byers said:
    Below are clay models of the obverse and reverse of the Indian Head nickel, sculpted by James Earle Fraser:

    Interesting. I don’t recall seeing any clay models, of Buffalos or of anything else. And I wonder how durable clay would be after a century on the shelf. Actually, I don’t even know what century old clay would look like. Are you sure the above is clay and not plaster?

    The clay will dry out and get quite stiff (but also prone to breakage).
    Dried-out ceramic clay can be fired to produce a harder material that is less prone to cracking (although it can still break like a fired clay dish).

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    dcarrdcarr Posts: 8,007 ✭✭✭✭✭

    @Byers said:

    @davewesen said:
    How big are these things?

    the half says 167 mm so near 6.5" in diameter?
    the nickel says 101 mm inner near 4" and 25 mm rim near 1" more on each side?

    I ask because when I see the sculptors working on the designs, it looks closer to 12-15"

    I can’t comment on the sizes on the 2 (plaster and galvano) in the upcoming StacksBowers auction, but regarding the sizes of the James Fraser and Laura Fraser models that I have, the sizes vary from 6 inches to 15 inches.

    .

    My Broken Sword Peace Dollar reverse is not a plaster or an electrotype galvano. It is a solid bronze casting which could also function in a reduction lathe like a galvano. The diameter of the outer rim on the design is 7.5 inches. With the typical 1:5 reduction, the result is a 1.5-inch diameter hub. In other words, plasters and galvanos are typically created at 5 times the final intended size. There can be variations, of course.

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    ByersByers Posts: 1,477 ✭✭✭✭✭

    What a wild set this would make!

    De Francisci‘s Peace Dollar:

    •Obverse Plaster (adopted design)

    •Obverse Splasher (adopted design)

    •Reverse Bronze Cast (adopted design but with the broken sword)

    I can’t think of any other De Francisci adopted Peace Dollar design of the obverse or reverse, as a plaster, splasher or bronze cast in private hands.

    mikebyers.com Dealer in Major Mint Errors, Die Trials & Patterns - Author of NLG Best World Coin Book World's Greatest Mint Errors - Publisher & Editor of minterrornews.com.
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    Morgan13Morgan13 Posts: 894 ✭✭✭✭✭
    edited March 23, 2024 7:11AM

    This is likely nothing more than a decoration but it was hung in my grandparents home for at least 50 years. I've had it in storage for at least 30 years. I thought of it when this thread popped up and figured it's worth a share.

    Student of numismatics and collector of Morgan dollars
    Successful BST transactions with: Namvet Justindan Mattniss RWW olah_in_MA

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    ByersByers Posts: 1,477 ✭✭✭✭✭

    I think that this Nickel is the only OTHER know De Francisci plaster, splasher, electrotrial or bronze cast of any U.S. denomination in private hands.

    Jefferson Nickel Die Trial
    Reverse Electrotrial
    by Anthony De Francisci
    Judd #JC1938-1 PCGS MS 62 UNIQUE


    mikebyers.com Dealer in Major Mint Errors, Die Trials & Patterns - Author of NLG Best World Coin Book World's Greatest Mint Errors - Publisher & Editor of minterrornews.com.
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    ctf_error_coinsctf_error_coins Posts: 15,433 ✭✭✭✭✭

    Wow, just wow.

    Very cool history in those exceptional pieces, and you are still unpacking !!!

    Show us more.

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    GoldenEggGoldenEgg Posts: 1,923 ✭✭✭✭✭

    There are some true treasures in these photos. I see both LGF and JEF designs here. That Saint Gaudens piece is a very desirable item.

    @Byers said:
    Still unwrapping, sorting and researching more Fraser items. Here are a couple images. I will post more later.


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    ByersByers Posts: 1,477 ✭✭✭✭✭

    @GoldenEgg said:
    There are some true treasures in these photos. I see both LGF and JEF designs here. That Saint Gaudens piece is a very desirable item.

    @Byers said:
    Still unwrapping, sorting and researching more Fraser items. Here are a couple images. I will post more later.


    Yes. An example in StacksBowers sold for $9400.

    mikebyers.com Dealer in Major Mint Errors, Die Trials & Patterns - Author of NLG Best World Coin Book World's Greatest Mint Errors - Publisher & Editor of minterrornews.com.
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    DCWDCW Posts: 6,975 ✭✭✭✭✭

    @Byers said:
    Still unwrapping, sorting and researching more Fraser items. Here are a couple images. I will post more later.


    Mike, did you buy all these? What are you unwrapping? I must have missed this part of the thread

    Dead Cat Waltz Exonumia
    "Coin collecting for outcasts..."

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    ByersByers Posts: 1,477 ✭✭✭✭✭

    @DCW said:

    @Byers said:
    Still unwrapping, sorting and researching more Fraser items. Here are a couple images. I will post more later.


    Mike, did you buy all these? What are you unwrapping? I must have missed this part of the thread

    Yes!

    The image that you referenced are just a few of them. Later on I will publish more, focusing on those that are unknown to the numismatic community. There is one in clay from James Fraser, a galvano from him as well, and additional different plasters from both James and Laura.

    I imaged a few of the medals and die trials
    in that picture just to share as I was unwrapping them. I need to open, unwrap and sort out the rest of these.

    But my primary focus will be on the one in clay, the other different galvano and the remaining plasters that were not in this Mint Error News Issue.

    A few of them ( not in this image) were published and featured in the latest edition of Mint Error News. These were unknown to the numismatic community at large. Such as the unique Laura Fraser galvano of the obverse of the Charles Lindberg gold Congressional Medal, the Laura Fraser plaster of the reverse of this same medal, a plaster of Laura’s Fraser Oregon Trail design, Laura Fraser’s Oklahoma Run plaster, and others.

    I just finished publishing the latest issue of Mint Error News so now I can finally focus on unwrapping the last few boxes of James and Laura Fraser’s items.

    It’s always exciting news when events like this occur, and I wanted to share these discoveries with the readers of Mint Error News as well as sharing this in this thread.

    https://minterrornews.com/issue69.pdf

    mikebyers.com Dealer in Major Mint Errors, Die Trials & Patterns - Author of NLG Best World Coin Book World's Greatest Mint Errors - Publisher & Editor of minterrornews.com.
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    DCWDCW Posts: 6,975 ✭✭✭✭✭

    @Byers
    Really amazing stuff! I hope you are able to photograph and catalog these to be properly enjoyed. Just priceless history you have there. Congrats on ownership and thank you for sharing it with us.

    Dead Cat Waltz Exonumia
    "Coin collecting for outcasts..."

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    ByersByers Posts: 1,477 ✭✭✭✭✭

    @DCW said:
    @Byers
    Really amazing stuff! I hope you are able to photograph and catalog these to be properly enjoyed. Just priceless history you have there. Congrats on ownership and thank you for sharing it with us.

    I am glad that you appreciate and enjoy looking at new discoveries the same way that I do.

    mikebyers.com Dealer in Major Mint Errors, Die Trials & Patterns - Author of NLG Best World Coin Book World's Greatest Mint Errors - Publisher & Editor of minterrornews.com.
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    GoBustGoBust Posts: 586 ✭✭✭✭✭

    Those are all very very cool. 😎

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