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Crazy prices for circulated liberty seated quarters!

CrepidoderaCrepidodera Posts: 277 ✭✭✭✭✭

David Lawrence Rare Coins auctions of "Helen's Quarter Collection" have resulted in some wild prices for circulated liberty seated quarters. Feb. 29th - 1866-S PCGS VF30 sold for $7,150, PCGS retail price - $2,250. March 14th - 1870 PCGS AU58 CAC sold for $7,055, PCGS retail price - $1,325!!

Doug

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    skier07skier07 Posts: 3,692 ✭✭✭✭✭

    There are so few recent comps that price guides are not very helpful.

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    rheddenrhedden Posts: 6,619 ✭✭✭✭✭

    High-end Seated 25c seem to be in short supply compared to 3-5 years ago. Still, it looks like the auction contained many coins that were exceptionally nice for the grade. The prices realized may not be reflective of the series in general.

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    yosclimberyosclimber Posts: 4,596 ✭✭✭✭✭
    edited March 15, 2024 4:19AM
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    fathomfathom Posts: 1,513 ✭✭✭✭✭

    Those are earth shattering results for circulated seated quarters. I don't know how else to perceive those prices.

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    291fifth291fifth Posts: 23,942 ✭✭✭✭✭

    The high prices will drive more collections to the auction market as current collectors realize they are now priced out of the market for even circulated Liberty Seated quarters. The high prices may also start to drive many of the hoarded scarce and rare dates to market.

    All glory is fleeting.
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    JBNJBN Posts: 1,799 ✭✭✭✭✭

    1864 quarter in P53 CAC went for $2327. Underbidder (way under) on that one....
    The 1870 quarter was amazing - over double guide going into the final days and rocketed up much further.

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    logger7logger7 Posts: 8,084 ✭✭✭✭✭

    Is this the registry set phenomenon with fierce competition to get key coins again?

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    seatedlib3991seatedlib3991 Posts: 514 ✭✭✭✭

    It has often been said that you can't judge a market by a single coin or even a dozen or more.
    I can't play in that end of the pool, but I saw those coins and would have thrown the price guides out the window too. Some coins are just way better than others and that is why they are price guides and not price specifics. Good to see other people interested in Seated Quarters though. James

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    scubafuelscubafuel Posts: 1,734 ✭✭✭✭✭

    Some of those coins, looking like that come along once every 5 years or so. If you don’t buy them now, you might have a hole in your set for 5 years, plus prices will have moved higher when you get another shot. That means you need to pay the guide price from 2029 today to buy them. When I check that guide, these prices are almost perfectly in-line.

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    fathomfathom Posts: 1,513 ✭✭✭✭✭

    Regardless if it's only one auction CU tracks DL auction results.

    Those of us with a few seated qs should see a well deserved bump in values.

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    jdimmickjdimmick Posts: 9,600 ✭✭✭✭✭

    The 71-cc in Au-55 went from 80k to 102,750 in just 2 years since it was sold last by legend

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    FrankHFrankH Posts: 773 ✭✭✭✭✭

    Que sera'; sera' ;)
    Not a whole lot is making "sense" in coins today.
    Other than bullion I wouldn't put much money into them. :)

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    WalkerfanWalkerfan Posts: 8,974 ✭✭✭✭✭
    edited March 15, 2024 8:44AM

    High grade, beauty, rarity and few buying opportunities will result in strong prices.

    “I may not believe in myself but I believe in what I’m doing” ~Jimmy Page~

    My Full Walker Registry Set (1916-1947)

    https://www.ngccoin.com/registry/competitive-sets/16292/

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    johnny9434johnny9434 Posts: 27,512 ✭✭✭✭✭
    edited March 15, 2024 8:53AM

    if some one wants to spend that type of money then God bless you, fwiw

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    Manifest_DestinyManifest_Destiny Posts: 3,700 ✭✭✭✭✭

    @scubafuel said:
    Some of those coins, looking like that come along once every 5 years or so. If you don’t buy them now, you might have a hole in your set for 5 years, plus prices will have moved higher when you get another shot. That means you need to pay the guide price from 2029 today to buy them. When I check that guide, these prices are almost perfectly in-line.

    This is the issue. Some of these are so rare in problem free VF-XF that you wont see another one for years.

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    CrepidoderaCrepidodera Posts: 277 ✭✭✭✭✭

    I won several coins in the four sessions and paid dearly.

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    goldengolden Posts: 9,063 ✭✭✭✭✭

    Price guides are just that, guides. I have bid well over guides and won and have bid well over guides and lost many times.

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    conrad99conrad99 Posts: 345 ✭✭✭

    @scubafuel said:
    Some of those coins, looking like that come along once every 5 years or so. If you don’t buy them now, you might have a hole in your set for 5 years, plus prices will have moved higher when you get another shot. That means you need to pay the guide price from 2029 today to buy them. When I check that guide, these prices are almost perfectly in-line.

    Ooh how do I get my hands on a copy?!

    That could really simplify my life ;)

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    LJenkins11LJenkins11 Posts: 726 ✭✭✭✭✭

    @conrad99 ... you'd obviously need an enhanced buisness strike DeLorean.

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    RLSnapperRLSnapper Posts: 521 ✭✭✭✭✭

    Some raw meat closing tonite on Ebay. Good luck to those who are bidding!

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    Cougar1978Cougar1978 Posts: 7,637 ✭✭✭✭✭
    edited March 16, 2024 10:49AM

    Yes saw that at recent show / guy across aisle had some slabbed ones a bit over CPG (retail) but he sold a few. Strong demand. Expect to pay the money.

    So Cali Area - Coins & Currency
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    rec78rec78 Posts: 5,690 ✭✭✭✭✭

    @RLSnapper said:
    Some raw meat closing tonite on Ebay. Good luck to those who are bidding!

    Hammered at $785.02

    It's about time the market realized the true rarety of liberty seated coins. A beat up 1866-s also sold for over $500.00
    I am vglad that I finished my liberty seated sets over 15 years ago. Time to sell I guess. The prices for bust and seated coins are not coming down any time soon.

    image
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    Manifest_DestinyManifest_Destiny Posts: 3,700 ✭✭✭✭✭

    Nice!

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    JBNJBN Posts: 1,799 ✭✭✭✭✭

    That 64 quarter is very nice. Congratulations.

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    RichieURichRichieURich Posts: 8,371 ✭✭✭✭✭

    It's gotten to the point where you might have ten serious collectors of Seated Quarters looking for a certain semi-key date,and only one coin up for sale; this leads to higher prices. And there are maybe twenty collectors looking for each key date.

    An authorized PCGS dealer, and a contributor to the Red Book.

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    CrepidoderaCrepidodera Posts: 277 ✭✭✭✭✭

    @JBN said:
    That 64 quarter is very nice. Congratulations.

    Thank you!

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    CrepidoderaCrepidodera Posts: 277 ✭✭✭✭✭

    @rhedden,

    Thanks for posting photos of your coins. I really love your 1842-O and 1864 examples. I think I owned your 1859-O at one time. I agree with you about the 1864-S/1872-S quarters, 1872-S is much rarer. I wish I still owned the PCGS XF40 CAC example of the 1864-S from my second collection.

    Doug

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    EddiEddi Posts: 455 ✭✭✭✭✭
    edited March 21, 2024 12:13PM

    @rhedden said:
    Here are my thoughts on some of the coins posted above, and a few pictures of my examples.

    1842-O Large date: Tough to find in any grade higher than VF. MS graded examples in TPG holders are usually heavily toned and don't look any better than an AU. A condition rarity, but overlooked because 1842-o Small Date steals the thunder. My example is a PCGS AU58 with great eye appeal except for a rim bump that probably precluded CAC approval. I paid dearly for it after many years of looking and passing up numerous MS62-64 graded examples that just didn't have eye appeal.

    Thank you for posting that information regarding the scarcity of 1842-O quarters in grades above VF. I was not aware of that.

    If I may, this is an example I found at a coin show here in Germany some years; besides the low price I paid, it also shows an interesting feature: per information to be found in the net, the reverse of the 1842-O quarter is found in two varieties: one with eagle with 'closed claws', the other with 'open claws', (Briggs reverse A and reverse D respectively).

    The open claws variety seems to be very scarce (but probably very little known, and therefore not likely to get collectors too excited).

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    rheddenrhedden Posts: 6,619 ✭✭✭✭✭

    The trouble with minor varieties in Seated 25c is that many of the coins are already so expensive in higher grades that die marriages are unlikely to bring much of a premium, outside of some major feature like an oversized mintmark. For example, my 1842-O also seems to be an Open Claws variety with a mintmark far to the left, but due to the high cost, I failed to even look it up in Briggs. (Shame on me.)

    Most Seated 25c collectors who search for varieties want to cherrypick everything. They won't pay a premium for a scarce die marriage that isn't one of the most obvious and popular varieties like 1840-O WD Large O, 1873 Closed 3, 1854-O Huge O, etc. Even the 1854-O Huge O sometimes sits in dealer inventories for months and months because everyone wants to cherrypick it without paying the variety premium. On the other hand, some sellers are happy to declare everything to be a rare die marriage and jack up the prices. (Welcome to Coins, right?)

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    WCCWCC Posts: 2,376 ✭✭✭✭✭

    @rhedden said:
    The trouble with minor varieties in Seated 25c is that many of the coins are already so expensive in higher grades that die marriages are unlikely to bring much of a premium, outside of some major feature like an oversized mintmark. For example, my 1842-O also seems to be an Open Claws variety with a mintmark far to the left, but due to the high cost, I failed to even look it up in Briggs. (Shame on me.)

    Most Seated 25c collectors who search for varieties want to cherrypick everything. They won't pay a premium for a scarce die marriage that isn't one of the most obvious and popular varieties like 1840-O WD Large O, 1873 Closed 3, 1854-O Huge O, etc. Even the 1854-O Huge O sometimes sits in dealer inventories for months and months because everyone wants to cherrypick it without paying the variety premium. On the other hand, some sellers are happy to declare everything to be a rare die marriage and jack up the prices. (Welcome to Coins, right?)

    Yes, it's a combination of the scarcity, prices, and the length of the series.

    When most cannot even complete the series by date/MM, there is no point in attempting to collect by variety.

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    Manifest_DestinyManifest_Destiny Posts: 3,700 ✭✭✭✭✭

    Reholdered trueviews. Considering the low quality pics lately, these aren't too bad.



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    tcollectstcollects Posts: 844 ✭✭✭✭

    nice coins but those pics

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    jesbrokenjesbroken Posts: 9,306 ✭✭✭✭✭

    @Crepidodera
    Now that is an interesting MintMark.
    Jim


    When a man who is honestly mistaken hears the truth, he will either quit being mistaken or cease to be honest....Abraham Lincoln

    Patriotism is supporting your country all the time, and your government when it deserves it.....Mark Twain
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    CrepidoderaCrepidodera Posts: 277 ✭✭✭✭✭

    @jesbroken said:
    @Crepidodera
    Now that is an interesting MintMark.
    Jim

    Really heavy die polishing!

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