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The NCAA Is Dead, And Pay-For-Play Is Alive, Well And Now Out In The Open

stevekstevek Posts: 27,742 ✭✭✭✭✭

https://www.outkick.com/sports/ncaa-dead-pay-play-nil-tennessee-injunction-court

The NCAA Is Dead, And Pay-For-Play Is Alive, Well And Now Out In The Open


This is so cool. Now you may see scouts watching your child's Little League games.

Will the sports betting sites take action on Pee-Wee football? 😆

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    Basebal21Basebal21 Posts: 2,268 ✭✭✭✭
    edited February 24, 2024 11:19PM

    It actually is a good thing schools and even states at this point are finally fighting back on the NCAAs nonsense. They have a long history of just saying hold my beer when you think they couldnt make any worse decisions than they already have. Most of the lawsuits the NCAA has been losing in court have to do with anti trust violations.

    In this case it has to do with them targeting several big name national brand schools where they were retroactively preparing to punish them for rules that didnt exist at the time. Unlike in the past the schools werent scared and there were other schools and other states ready to jump in if necessary and may end up doing so anyways when/if it goes to trial. Currently the big ACC schools (who were also some of the targets) are more concerned about the FSU lawsuit against the conference trying to get out of the ACC which would be a massive win for them monetarily.

    Theres no reason why a recruit shouldnt be able to legally know their full offer. You wouldnt accept a job and then say okay whats my salary, you would know that ahead of time. High level college sports are a job that take countless hours of work and training. They were being told anyways and being paid anyways for decades.

    Bringing it out in the open has actually brought more sanity to it. Initially there were some crazy numbers thrown around, most werent true, but the numbers have been normalizing and theyre figuring out more and more what the value of the positions is.

    Side note despite the authors beliefs, they actually do make massive money based off their social media followings. Livvy Dunne is a top 10 if not top 5 NIL athlete from the exposure of her brand reach not because of fanatical gymnastic fans wanting to see LSU gymnastics succeed. If social media didnt matter only football, basketball, and SEC/ACC/Big 12 baseball players would have NIL deals from collectives.

    NIL isnt limited to school based collectives, brands give them all the time for large social media followings that have nothing to do with the school

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    stevekstevek Posts: 27,742 ✭✭✭✭✭

    I can envision it now. Little Billy playing T-ball hits a home run. The parents get all excited with dollar signs in their eyes, figuring they gave birth to the next Babe Ruth.

    They contact a sports agent for representation at crooked-agents-r-us.con

    The fast talking agent offers them the deluxe package of national marketing for Billy for only a pittance of 10k start-up costs, and a meager 2k per month as a retainer. Media advertising and other costs not included. The parents gleefully sign the contract, and dream of one day living in Beverly Hills.

    The parents immediately drop Billy out of school, and basically put him on a 24/7 regimen of baseball, baseball, and more baseball. Yes, when Billy is an adult, he won't be able to sign his own name or add 2+2, but he will be making countless millions of dollars playing for the New York Yankees.

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    Basebal21Basebal21 Posts: 2,268 ✭✭✭✭

    That already happens and has been happening for decades. Half of MLB is from foreign players that grew up in the sports academies in the Dominican and other places and signed and were shipped off to the minor leagues at the age of 16.

    ESPN televises the Little League World Series because it makes them money as another example.

    You can go back over a decade and 7th and 8th graders were getting scholarship offers for college football. They dont mean anything since they arent binding but all of this has already been happening for a long time.

    Theres no reason why someone of any age shouldnt be able to make money off of their own name and image, especially when other people are

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    stevekstevek Posts: 27,742 ✭✭✭✭✭

    @Basebal21 said:
    That already happens and has been happening for decades. Half of MLB is from foreign players that grew up in the sports academies in the Dominican and other places and signed and were shipped off to the minor leagues at the age of 16.

    ESPN televises the Little League World Series because it makes them money as another example.

    You can go back over a decade and 7th and 8th graders were getting scholarship offers for college football. They dont mean anything since they arent binding but all of this has already been happening for a long time.

    Theres no reason why someone of any age shouldnt be able to make money off of their own name and image, especially when other people are

    You make some excellent points. However I'm just fearful that way too many parents are going to go overboard with this. Instead of what caring parents should be doing first, of instilling a good education into their kids, then sports. Selfish parents will do just the opposite for their own perceived benefit, while ignoring the long shot reality of their kids actually one day making a living playing sports.

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    Basebal21Basebal21 Posts: 2,268 ✭✭✭✭
    edited February 25, 2024 8:27PM

    @stevek said:

    @Basebal21 said:
    That already happens and has been happening for decades. Half of MLB is from foreign players that grew up in the sports academies in the Dominican and other places and signed and were shipped off to the minor leagues at the age of 16.

    ESPN televises the Little League World Series because it makes them money as another example.

    You can go back over a decade and 7th and 8th graders were getting scholarship offers for college football. They dont mean anything since they arent binding but all of this has already been happening for a long time.

    Theres no reason why someone of any age shouldnt be able to make money off of their own name and image, especially when other people are

    You make some excellent points. However I'm just fearful that way too many parents are going to go overboard with this. Instead of what caring parents should be doing first, of instilling a good education into their kids, then sports. Selfish parents will do just the opposite for their own perceived benefit, while ignoring the long shot reality of their kids actually one day making a living playing sports.

    Thats already happened with the invention of social media. You have 7 year olds on youtube with millions of followers reviewing toys, countless kids streaming video games on twitch and other platforms, a bunch of teen millionaires that made/make their money on the tictok boom etc. In a lot of cases it was the child/teen themselves that built it in this new media age. The only difference when it comes to sports is you still have to be in school (at least in the US) since while media followers are important you still have to be good enough and playing as far as the collectives go.

    35 States already have NIL legal for HS players which is ultimately what the NCAA was targeting schools over during recruitment. Many of these players will already have had outside NIL deals from businesses given that almost all of the big recruiting states have legalized it already and the NCAA cant do anything about that. The big thing this case really impacts are the school collectives which really are just boosters and not employees of the school anyways.

    Parents that want to exploit their kids will regardless of what any NIL rules are. Payments wouldnt stop either and things being in the open make it harder for players to just take money from 5 different schools like they would in the past and then still not go there. We can also stop the creating fake jobs for family at companies nonsense that was what would happen decades ago, or the coming home and finding a bag of cash in a place the player clearly couldnt afford stuff like what happened to USC 20 years ago.

    It is a very positive thing that its in the open now. Coaches complain because now their job is harder and there has been more parity with the transfer portal as well, Complaining is also a way to encourage boosters and businesses to give better deals which is a recruiting tool.

    The current injunction has no impact over little kids anyways thats a separate issue. What it was was the NCAA trying to target several schools retroactively for collectives having contact with recruits and the NCAA is trying to say the collectives shouldnt be allowed to tell a recruit what they will get if they sign there. The second they officially signed the player would be allowed to have the same conversations but the NCAA is trying to say that cannot happen before they signed which is just stupid.

    We really dont need the NCAA especially with their history. They just love shooting themselves in the foot speeding up the major conferences and programs saying weve had enough

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    Alfonz24Alfonz24 Posts: 3,050 ✭✭✭✭✭

    Next is the death of the 4 year eligibility rule. 15 year college players not good enough to jump to "professional" leagues.

    #LetsGoSwitzerlandThe Man Who Does Not Read Has No Advantage Over the Man Who Cannot Read. The biggest obstacle to progress is a habit of “buying what we want and begging for what we need.”You get the Freedom you fight for and get the Oppression you deserve.
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    stevekstevek Posts: 27,742 ✭✭✭✭✭

    @Alfonz24 said:
    Next is the death of the 4 year eligibility rule. 15 year college players not good enough to jump to "professional" leagues.

    I just think there may be all sorts of negative ramifications in the long run occurring from this. As much as I enjoy sports, a society choosing sports over education for school age kids, especially in today's rapidly growing world of technology, is a society which will be in decline, and perhaps worse than can be imagined right now.

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    Basebal21Basebal21 Posts: 2,268 ✭✭✭✭

    @Alfonz24 said:
    Next is the death of the 4 year eligibility rule. 15 year college players not good enough to jump to "professional" leagues.

    Its 5 years. You can play a certain number of games and still be allowed to red shirt which doesnt count against eligibility. For football you can appear in 4 games. The reason so many 6th years have been around lately is because every athlete was offered an extra year if they wanted it from 2020 not counting. Appearing in any more than 5 seasons requires a waiver that is sometimes granted when a major injury occurred that ends someones season early

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