Home U.S. Coin Forum

Does this look like doubling?

I wasn’t sure if this is doubling or not…

It’s really one of the hardest part of being new, I’ve watched 20 YouTube videos and I still don’t totally understand what I’m supposed to be looking for..

(The famous ones, like 1955 penny are obvious, it’s the more subtle ones that are hard—)

Thank you!

Comments

  • nwcoastnwcoast Posts: 2,807 ✭✭✭✭✭
    edited February 11, 2024 9:26PM

    Nope. Sorry but this appears to be machine doubling.
    I might suggest other educational resources than YouTube, unless you are VERY selective as to the channels you are watching.

    This is one the the better sites for such research.

    http://doubleddie.com/60701.html

    Also, don’t bother searching for double dies on year/mint marks that haven’t already been documented.

    Happy hunting!

    Edited to add:
    It would be more helpful to see a good photo of the entire coin rather than one detail view shot at an angle .

    Happy, humble, honored and proud recipient of the “You Suck” award 10/22/2014

  • AUandAGAUandAG Posts: 24,477 ✭✭✭✭✭

    When it looks like a shelf or steps then it's not die doubling. Common result of die chatter or ejection processes.
    bob :)

    Registry: CC lowballs (boblindstrom), [email protected]
  • TomBTomB Posts: 20,604 ✭✭✭✭✭

    I did not create this image, but the artist who did is credited-

    Thomas Bush Numismatics & Numismatic Photography

    In honor of the memory of Cpl. Michael E. Thompson

    image
  • Thanks for your response and the link — that diagram is great —

    I’m going to go to the next coin show to see some double dies in person, with more experience I’ll start to get it :)

    Thank you very much — your responses are really appreciated :)

  • BryceMBryceM Posts: 11,684 ✭✭✭✭✭

    Keep in mind that almost all double-die coins are known. Every single coin produced from that die pair will be doubled in exactly the same way.

  • JBKJBK Posts: 14,503 ✭✭✭✭✭

    If you are looking for doubled dies, you should start by making a list of dates/mintmarks that have known doubled dies, search for those coins, and then scrutinize those coins. If you think you see something you can then compare them to photos of the known DDs.

  • There will be many more undiscovered doubling, errors, die pairings, etc to be discovered. So don't give up... And no the professionals are not always right!

  • DeplorableDanDeplorableDan Posts: 2,474 ✭✭✭✭✭

    @THE_SQUIRREL said:
    There will be many more undiscovered doubling, errors, die pairings, etc to be discovered. So don't give up... And no the professionals are not always right!

    So you're encouraging OP to ignore the advice in this thread, and to keep wasting his/her time to look for undocumented errors and varieties that havent been discovered yet? Rather than learning about the ones already documented, and trying to find those?

Leave a Comment

BoldItalicStrikethroughOrdered listUnordered list
Emoji
Image
Align leftAlign centerAlign rightToggle HTML viewToggle full pageToggle lights
Drop image/file