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1982 D Zinc Large Date 1c

Hey everyone, sorry if this is a silly question, but I need two more cents for my Lincoln album, and every time I come across an 82D Large date and do a ping test its always copper. Is there something that I might be doing wrong that maybe makes the coin do a high pitched ping because it seems insane how uncommon the zinc 82's are. At school I test composite doing ping tests so I think my ears are keen to the sounds but it feels like I'm going crazy with how many rolls I'm searching without the zinc 82 cents. Any tips are appreciated, and I apologize if this has been asked before. Thanks guys.

</> Everybody wants to get the bread, but no one wants to eat the crust. </>

Comments

  • IkesTIkesT Posts: 2,374 ✭✭✭✭✭

    Weigh them.

  • OAKSTAROAKSTAR Posts: 5,494 ✭✭✭✭✭

    Ping test? I'll skip that test.

    Disclaimer: I'm not a dealer, trader, grader, investor or professional numismatist. I'm just a hobbyist. (To protect me but mostly you! 🤣 )

  • ajyasajyas Posts: 38 ✭✭✭

    i don't have a scale as of this moment but pennies after 82 make a thud and ones before 82 make a high pitched ring, but I guess I probably should try and find a scale soon.

    </> Everybody wants to get the bread, but no one wants to eat the crust. </>

  • MarkKelleyMarkKelley Posts: 1,743 ✭✭✭✭✭

    You can make a simple balance scale from almost anything. Take a dozen known copper cents (pre-1982) and find the lightest one among them. Use this coin against your 1982 test cents. The zinc ones will rise every time.

  • GreenstangGreenstang Posts: 725 ✭✭✭✭

    If you are going to get into coin collecting and are looking for varieties,
    a scale is a must. Be sure to get one that is good to at least 2 decimal points.
    This is much easier and more accurate than dropping a coin on a table.

  • ajyasajyas Posts: 38 ✭✭✭

    @MarkKelley said:
    You can make a simple balance scale from almost anything. Take a dozen known copper cents (pre-1982) and find the lightest one among them. Use this coin against your 1982 test cents. The zinc ones will rise every time.

    That's a good idea, Ill try that out

    </> Everybody wants to get the bread, but no one wants to eat the crust. </>

  • ajyasajyas Posts: 38 ✭✭✭

    @Greenstang said:
    If you are going to get into coin collecting and are looking for varieties,
    a scale is a must. Be sure to get one that is good to at least 2 decimal points.
    This is much easier and more accurate than dropping a coin on a table.

    Thanks, I had one but it was broken while in someone elses possession. Do you recommend any specific brands?

    </> Everybody wants to get the bread, but no one wants to eat the crust. </>

  • Steven59Steven59 Posts: 8,176 ✭✭✭✭✭

    Any battery operated one for under 10$ that has a cover and you can slip it in your pocket will do just fine.

  • Snowman24Snowman24 Posts: 466 ✭✭✭

    No - your question is not silly. I took an estimate of the 7 varieties of 1982 Lincolns for over a long time. Paul Malone from Numismatic news liked my research, so he did an article from the numbers. I'll post the article here so you can read it.

    So, In a quick answer. The 1982 D large date zinc is estimated to be 2.7% of the total 6 billion "D's" produced compared to the large date copper at around 80%. That number gets smaller after 40 years. Keep searching. Snowman

  • Snowman24Snowman24 Posts: 466 ✭✭✭

    Here is the article from Numismatic news

  • ajyasajyas Posts: 38 ✭✭✭
    edited January 5, 2024 6:26PM

    Thanks Snowman. I thought I was going crazy because I found the other zinc cents no problem. I appreciate the links a lot.

    </> Everybody wants to get the bread, but no one wants to eat the crust. </>

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