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Does anyone think the coins we collect today will rise in value?

Morgan13Morgan13 Posts: 705 ✭✭✭✭✭

Thinking about the thread about buying coins in the 70's.
Do you think they will go up in value a similar way?
Will a $500 Morgan be worth $1200 or more. Or do you think it will be simular value as today?

Student of numismatics and collector of Morgan dollars

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Comments

  • oldabeintxoldabeintx Posts: 1,564 ✭✭✭✭✭

    I would like to think that coins with broad historical interest will appreciate over the long haul. Things that seem faddish or overblown today or that have more nostalgic or investor interest, more problematic, even in the near term.

  • OAKSTAROAKSTAR Posts: 5,443 ✭✭✭✭✭

    @Morgan13 said:
    Does anyone think the coins we collect today will rise in value?

    In one word or two?

    Disclaimer: I'm not a dealer, trader, grader, investor or professional numismatist. I'm just a hobbyist. (To protect me but mostly you! 🤣 )

  • OAKSTAROAKSTAR Posts: 5,443 ✭✭✭✭✭

    No

    Disclaimer: I'm not a dealer, trader, grader, investor or professional numismatist. I'm just a hobbyist. (To protect me but mostly you! 🤣 )

  • OAKSTAROAKSTAR Posts: 5,443 ✭✭✭✭✭

    or

    Disclaimer: I'm not a dealer, trader, grader, investor or professional numismatist. I'm just a hobbyist. (To protect me but mostly you! 🤣 )

  • OAKSTAROAKSTAR Posts: 5,443 ✭✭✭✭✭

    Hell no!

    Disclaimer: I'm not a dealer, trader, grader, investor or professional numismatist. I'm just a hobbyist. (To protect me but mostly you! 🤣 )

  • OAKSTAROAKSTAR Posts: 5,443 ✭✭✭✭✭
    edited January 2, 2024 1:32PM

    I guess it would be nice if our coins went up in value but I'm just a hobbyist not an investor.

    Disclaimer: I'm not a dealer, trader, grader, investor or professional numismatist. I'm just a hobbyist. (To protect me but mostly you! 🤣 )

  • MizzouMizzou Posts: 463 ✭✭✭✭
    edited January 2, 2024 1:48PM

    It would depend on the coin. Modern coins probably won't be worth much in our lifetimes however, the key dates, Carson Cities and old gold will continue to increase just like they have for decades.

    Sometimes I think that animals are smarter than humans, animals would never allow the dumbest one to lead the pack

  • Manifest_DestinyManifest_Destiny Posts: 2,975 ✭✭✭✭✭

    Everything will rise in value - inflation. The question is: Will they rise enough to outpace inflation? For the most part, no. Coins have never been a good investment.

  • mikee999mikee999 Posts: 321 ✭✭✭✭

    No & yes

  • fluffy155fluffy155 Posts: 219 ✭✭✭✭

    Yes absolutely, for truly desirable coins. The hobby was "dying" in the 90s with no interest from the younger generation and nice coins going begging. My LCS replaced most of their coin displays with sports cards. Somehow the 1990s became "30 years ago" and I wish I could buy those coins for those prices. I'll be dead in 30 years and while the market will have another swing in that time I think the prices of quality coins will recover and strengthen before I kick the bucket.

  • Morgan13Morgan13 Posts: 705 ✭✭✭✭✭

    @OAKSTAR said:
    I guess it would be nice if our coins went up in value but I'm just a hobbyist not an investor.

    I'm a hobbyist also but it would only be intelligent to be realistic about long term values. If you really don't think your an investor with every coin you buy than you don't mind overpaying?
    Of course not and neither do I
    So for every dollar I invest in a coin for my collection it would be good to see a $500 coin become worth $600 instead of $450. Buying Morgan dollars is a risky move with money because for the most part they are common. It's just what I like.
    I definetly agree that gold and silver will rise. I think silver is a bargain right now. Dirt cheap. That's not what I'm talking about here though.
    Definelty good feedback!

    Student of numismatics and collector of Morgan dollars

  • OAKSTAROAKSTAR Posts: 5,443 ✭✭✭✭✭
    edited January 2, 2024 2:54PM

    I'm just not smart enough to put the words coins and investment in the same sentence. In addition to that, I've never met a financial advisor that said: Add coins to your portfolio. But I understand your point @Morgan13

    Disclaimer: I'm not a dealer, trader, grader, investor or professional numismatist. I'm just a hobbyist. (To protect me but mostly you! 🤣 )

  • WCCWCC Posts: 2,338 ✭✭✭✭✭

    If by 70's you mean the price change between the early 70's and late 70's/early 80's, not adjusted for price changes.

    If this price performance is ever replicated, it will price out most or too many collectors out of what they want to buy or can afford. Collectors will or may migrate "downward", but it's not anecdotally supported that they are willing to do so to this extent or that they will be willing to pay multiples for the same coins they bought only a few years previously for so much less.

    This isn't a statement of "fact" or all collectors. It's an inference of general market behavior.

  • joeykoinsjoeykoins Posts: 14,751 ✭✭✭✭✭

    Who knows about any coins? Modern or Older. But, if I were to guess any series.
    I would have to say the "Westpoint Quarters".
    Very special series!

    "Jesus died for you and for me, Thank you,Jesus"!!!

    --- If it should happen I die and leave this world and you want to remember me. Please only remember my opening Sig Line.
  • ctf_error_coinsctf_error_coins Posts: 15,403 ✭✭✭✭✭

    @OAKSTAR said:
    I'm just not smart enough to put the words coins and investment in the same sentence. In addition to that, I've never met a financial advisor that said: Add coins to your portfolio. But I understand your point @Morgan13

    My financial advisor said I should be buying coins as an investment into the future.

  • OnastoneOnastone Posts: 3,740 ✭✭✭✭✭

    Some will rise, some will fall...

    @Morgan13 said:

    Will a $500 Morgan be worth $1200 or more.

    Maybe...but like

    @Manifest_Destiny said:

    Everything will rise in value - inflation. The question is: Will they rise enough to outpace inflation? For the most part, no. Coins have never been a good investment.

    It's best to buy what you like, buy what you enjoy, that value is the true value.

  • pcgscacgoldpcgscacgold Posts: 2,595 ✭✭✭✭✭

    Luckily it’s a hobby for me. I buys coins I like and plan to keep for many years. I won’t be around when many are sold. I will have enjoyed them immensely though.

  • ShaunBC5ShaunBC5 Posts: 1,591 ✭✭✭✭✭

    I look at my coin collection a lot like a bathroom remodel. It certainly adds to my holdings, but only at a fraction of what I put into it, dollar-wise. The value has to come from enjoyment and ownership. Certainly there are better and worse ways to buy for investment purposes (or plan a remodel) but my expectation is that I will pay something to be the owner (hopefully not a lot, though).
    I’m also someone who’s never used much change or collected from it. I used to be young but it seems like there are plenty of collectors younger than me that will at least keep keys and type coins going in value. Hopefully up at least a little.

  • 87redcivic87redcivic Posts: 117 ✭✭✭

    I see audiences of mainstream coin series continue to scatter. Like the switch from broadcast to streaming, collectors that were funneled to series featuring George, Ben, Frank, and Abe as the main character have many alternatives now.

    Foreign is more accessible than ever. New NCLT foreign series are started every month. The U.S. Mint has interesting precious metal series with changing designs releasing every year. There are more commemoratives that exist since 1982 than the classic 1892-1954 period. Exotic finishes aren't unusual anymore. More metals are being used in coinage.

    Anyway, I'm repeating a lot that has been said. I'm never going to get rich through coins. I'm personally hoping to break-even if I'm ever in the position to sell.

  • DoubleEagle59DoubleEagle59 Posts: 8,139 ✭✭✭✭✭

    Price will increase mostly due to Inflation as it will be the main driving factor.

    Collector base is declining as proof of this is look at all the grey hair (or no hair) at any large coin event.

    On the other hand, top quality coins will appreciate but 99% of us are not in that class of collector.

    "Gold is money, and nothing else" (JP Morgan, 1912)

    "“Those who sacrifice liberty for security/safety deserve neither.“(Benjamin Franklin)

    "I only golf on days that end in 'Y'" (DE59)
  • DoubleEagle59DoubleEagle59 Posts: 8,139 ✭✭✭✭✭

    Quick search on Google resulted in these pictures of some US coin clubs........


    "Gold is money, and nothing else" (JP Morgan, 1912)

    "“Those who sacrifice liberty for security/safety deserve neither.“(Benjamin Franklin)

    "I only golf on days that end in 'Y'" (DE59)
  • OAKSTAROAKSTAR Posts: 5,443 ✭✭✭✭✭

    @ctf_error_coins said:

    @OAKSTAR said:
    I'm just not smart enough to put the words coins and investment in the same sentence. In addition to that, I've never met a financial advisor that said: Add coins to your portfolio. But I understand your point @Morgan13

    My financial advisor said I should be buying coins as an investment into the future.

    I'm just wondering who's crazier, you or your advisor.

    Disclaimer: I'm not a dealer, trader, grader, investor or professional numismatist. I'm just a hobbyist. (To protect me but mostly you! 🤣 )

  • mirabelamirabela Posts: 4,937 ✭✭✭✭✭
    edited January 2, 2024 6:12PM

    @hfjacinto said:
    Some one once told me that Hobbies are for old people as the young have to much to do and not enough money. I agree with that. I did astronomy it was all old people, I was a photographer, it was also old people. Audiophiles, I know of no 20 year buying $5000 speakers and $3000 turntables, its the same with coins.

    You do raise a really good point. I would counter that while hobbies are for everybody, approaching hobbies in ways that are expensive is not often for the young. While I'm hardly "old," there did come a time in mid-life when I could start to feel like I had some wiggle room and could spend some on my passtimes. I'd been a collector since childhood, but things that had been out of reach began to seem less so.

    I think it's the same in regard to many of the things I do for fun -- I've been a fly angler almost as long as I've been a coin collector, and whereas I somehow made it from age 11 to age 40 with just one fly rod and one box of flies, somehow the next decade involved the arrival of a lot more gear. I've been a hiker and a backpacker nearly as long; five summers ago my son and I hiked in a part of Colorado I'd last been in when I was 19. We had a nice steak dinner in town and spent the night in a comfortable hotel; on my previous visit to the same town I spent the night stealth camped in somebody's potato field and ate minute rice I cooked over a Svea stove. Getting older has not been all bad, LOL ...

    To the OP's point, I view my collection as both a passtime and as decent a store of value as anything. I don't have so much tied up in it that it will change anything much if it craters, but I don't really expect it will. I don't necessarily expect them to rise in value, in the sense of beating inflation, but I think they'll probably retain most if not all of their value. I've done a lot of selling in the last 20 years, and in general the winners have been winners not so much because the market for that thing moved, but because I was able to buy it right in the first place.

    mirabela
  • privatecoinprivatecoin Posts: 3,140 ✭✭✭✭✭

    With inflation? Even a zincoln will increase in value.

    Paper money eventually returns to its intrinsic value. Zero. Voltaire. Ebay coinbowlllc

  • OAKSTAROAKSTAR Posts: 5,443 ✭✭✭✭✭
    edited January 2, 2024 7:41PM

    @joeykoins said:
    Who knows about any coins? Modern or Older. But, if I were to guess any series.
    I would have to say the "Westpoint Quarters".
    Very special series!

    The West Point Quarters......what? A perfect example of prices falling off a cliff since their inception.

    Disclaimer: I'm not a dealer, trader, grader, investor or professional numismatist. I'm just a hobbyist. (To protect me but mostly you! 🤣 )

  • ProofCollectionProofCollection Posts: 5,233 ✭✭✭✭✭

    Like anything, interest will ebb and flow. 100 years from now the coins we have today will be looked at as quaint. Will anyone want to collect them? I don't know. I look at memorabilia like what they have on Pawn Stars and I wonder if in a couple of decades who will care about Football items from the 1980s after everyone who remembers Football from that decade die off? Coins are a little difference because they are "Americana." My parents were obsessed with antiques for a while but it appears that market is dying off as no one wants to "crap up" their house with vintage wooden telephones and Roseville pottery. But coins are a little different.

  • bidaskbidask Posts: 13,812 ✭✭✭✭✭

    I have been collecting coins for over 60 years .🤓

    I’m also a financial advisor too😄

    43 years and going strong .

    I have found that owning high quality stocks for long duration makes a lot of sense and has paid off .

    Great coins can be the same .

    Own them.

    Think of Eric Newman or Clyde Hubbard .

    The world is your oyster .

    If I were a young person getting started I would look to buy/ own classic crowns ( silver dollar size coins of the world) that have great eye appeal and low pop.

    I manage money. I earn money. I save money .
    I give away money. I collect money.
    I don’t love money . I do love the Lord God.




  • OAKSTAROAKSTAR Posts: 5,443 ✭✭✭✭✭

    @bidask said:
    I have been collecting coins for over 60 years .🤓

    I’m also a financial advisor too😄

    43 years and going strong .

    I have found that owning high quality stocks for long duration makes a lot of sense and has paid off .

    Great coins can be the same .

    Own them.

    Think of Eric Newman or Clyde Hubbard .

    The world is your oyster .

    If I were a young person getting started I would look to buy/ own classic crowns ( silver dollar size coins of the world) that have great eye appeal and low pop.

    Then you've got the best of both world. If you can combine a hobby with a career and make money/a living a it, what's not to like.

    If someone is a professional coin dealer or a professional financial advisor and losing money, they're probably not good at it.

    Disclaimer: I'm not a dealer, trader, grader, investor or professional numismatist. I'm just a hobbyist. (To protect me but mostly you! 🤣 )

  • ctf_error_coinsctf_error_coins Posts: 15,403 ✭✭✭✭✭
    edited January 2, 2024 7:59PM

    @OAKSTAR said:

    @ctf_error_coins said:

    @OAKSTAR said:
    I'm just not smart enough to put the words coins and investment in the same sentence. In addition to that, I've never met a financial advisor that said: Add coins to your portfolio. But I understand your point @Morgan13

    My financial advisor said I should be buying coins as an investment into the future.

    I'm just wondering who's crazier, you or your advisor.

    Almost every person I meet, thinks that I am crazy.

    I absolutely love life and those I meet know this.

    My financial adviser is not crazy, but he listens to me and agrees with me on buying more coins instead of stocks which he makes a commission on.

  • OAKSTAROAKSTAR Posts: 5,443 ✭✭✭✭✭
    edited January 2, 2024 8:15PM

    @ctf_error_coins said:

    @OAKSTAR said:

    @ctf_error_coins said:

    @OAKSTAR said:
    I'm just not smart enough to put the words coins and investment in the same sentence. In addition to that, I've never met a financial advisor that said: Add coins to your portfolio. But I understand your point @Morgan13

    My financial advisor said I should be buying coins as an investment into the future.

    I'm just wondering who's crazier, you or your advisor.

    Almost every person I meet, thinks that I am crazy.

    I absolutely love life and those I meet know this.

    My financial adviser is not crazy, but he listens to me and agrees with me on buying more coins instead of stocks which he makes a commission on.

    If your financial adviser is listening to you, you should probably be the financial adviser. You don't need him! 🤣

    Like I stated in the post above yours. If you guys are making it work, you're both happy and making money, that's GREAT. If you both consider yourselves professionals and doing what you love, you'll never really work a day in your life.

    Disclaimer: I'm not a dealer, trader, grader, investor or professional numismatist. I'm just a hobbyist. (To protect me but mostly you! 🤣 )

  • braddickbraddick Posts: 22,838 ✭✭✭✭✭

    There is financial investment.
    There is peace of mind investment.

    I prefer the latter over the former and coin collecting fulfills that preference.

    peacockcoins

  • BLUEJAYWAYBLUEJAYWAY Posts: 7,800 ✭✭✭✭✭

    @ctf_error_coins said:

    @OAKSTAR said:
    I'm just not smart enough to put the words coins and investment in the same sentence. In addition to that, I've never met a financial advisor that said: Add coins to your portfolio. But I understand your point @Morgan13

    My financial advisor said I should be buying coins as an investment into the future.

    Is his coin advice specific to a certain type of coins? Errors or non error coinage? Is he a coin investor as well?

    Successful transactions:Tookybandit. "Everyone is equal, some are more equal than others".
  • ShaunBC5ShaunBC5 Posts: 1,591 ✭✭✭✭✭

    My guess is that through conversations and knowing each other, his FA has encouraged him to lean into what he’s an expert in and grow his own business.
    I would imagine that there aren’t other clients he’s encouraging to buy coins. Doesn’t sound as cool that way, though.

  • GoldFinger1969GoldFinger1969 Posts: 1,149 ✭✭✭✭

    If the coins are tied to bullion, YES.

    I believe that even quasi-numismatic Saints (i.e., MS-65/66 commons) will move up 50-75% on a $3,000 gold price that I believe is feasible by 2030. I think that $5,000 gold is possible by 2035.

    Ergo, I think since the floor for all Saints is the bullion price of a 1-ounce common in low-grade, I think other more rare and scare Saints will rise.

  • jfriedm56jfriedm56 Posts: 740 ✭✭✭✭✭

    For those of us fortunate enough to now have financial security and have invested and done well in the stock market(which absolutely drives me insane when it goes down), now converting to key date coins which brings me serenity. I truly believe those high quality, rare keys will always increase over time.

  • lermishlermish Posts: 1,757 ✭✭✭✭✭

    @bidask said:
    I have been collecting coins for over 60 years .🤓

    I’m also a financial advisor too😄

    43 years and going strong .

    I have found that owning high quality stocks for long duration makes a lot of sense and has paid off .

    Great coins can be the same .

    Own them.

    Think of Eric Newman or Clyde Hubbard .

    The world is your oyster .

    If I were a young person getting started I would look to buy/ own classic crowns ( silver dollar size coins of the world) that have great eye appeal and low pop.

    Other than the 60 years part, ditto to everything. Although my 43 years and going strong refers to my life rather than my career, only 16 years as an FA here.

  • jmlanzafjmlanzaf Posts: 31,251 ✭✭✭✭✭

    @privatecoin said:
    Stocks are great. Just remember to invest in big names like Enron.

    Lol. Broad- based index funds.

  • privatecoinprivatecoin Posts: 3,140 ✭✭✭✭✭

    @jmlanzaf said:

    @privatecoin said:
    Stocks are great. Just remember to invest in big names like Enron.

    Lol. Broad- based index funds.

    Or Theranos.... :D

    Paper money eventually returns to its intrinsic value. Zero. Voltaire. Ebay coinbowlllc

  • WCCWCC Posts: 2,338 ✭✭✭✭✭

    @ShaunBC5 said:
    My guess is that through conversations and knowing each other, his FA has encouraged him to lean into what he’s an expert in and grow his own business.
    I would imagine that there aren’t other clients he’s encouraging to buy coins. Doesn’t sound as cool that way, though.

    Yes, similar principle written by the authors of "The Millionaire Next Door", back in 1996 when $1MM was actually "big" money.

  • jmlanzafjmlanzaf Posts: 31,251 ✭✭✭✭✭

    @privatecoin said:

    @jmlanzaf said:

    @privatecoin said:
    Stocks are great. Just remember to invest in big names like Enron.

    Lol. Broad- based index funds.

    Or Theranos.... :D

    Or Amazon...or Microsoft...or Apple... ;)

  • WCCWCC Posts: 2,338 ✭✭✭✭✭

    @GoldFinger1969 said:
    If the coins are tied to bullion, YES.

    I believe that even quasi-numismatic Saints (i.e., MS-65/66 commons) will move up 50-75% on a $3,000 gold price that I believe is feasible by 2030. I think that $5,000 gold is possible by 2035.

    Ergo, I think since the floor for all Saints is the bullion price of a 1-ounce common in low-grade, I think other more rare and scare Saints will rise.

    The premiums (not prices) on most of the date/MM you consider scarce will probably shrink with $5K gold because the coins actually aren't that scarce. You didn't identify which ones meet your definition of rare, but I can infer that most are what I would describe as scarce, whether in a specific TPG label or generically.

    These aren't primarily correlated to the gold price, but financial conditions. I don't believe (hardly) anyone is paying meaningfully higher prices for the UHR, 1927-D or even a 21-S because the spot price rises 50% or 100%. These coins aren't (quasi) metal substitutes. There is or appears to be somewhat of a psychological connection, but the performance of inflated asset markets is a lot more important.

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