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Just a random question…..what is this?

I know, just seeing if anyone else appreciates it.

Q: When does a collector become a numismatist?



A: The year they spend more on their library than their coin collection.



A numismatist is judged more on the content of their library than the content of their cabinet.

Comments

  • BustDMsBustDMs Posts: 1,561 ✭✭✭✭✭

    @Sapyx said:
    Given the thin crinkly appearance of all the "coins", and how they appear to be laid out as a plate page for a book, I assume they're all foil pressings.

    In the era before photocopying and high-resolution printing, you had few options to show pictures of coins in your coin book. You could meticulously hand-illustrate the coins, but that would require hiring an artist and would take some time. Installing pages of rubbings or foil pressings in a low-print-run book was considered acceptable. Foil pressings worked better than rubbings for ancient coins, due to the high relief and uneven surfaces of a typical ancient coin.

    The other alternative is that they're electrotypes, which was long a standard museum technique for duplicating a coin in their collection. To make an electrotype, you make a plaster casting mould of your coin, make a wax cast model using the mould, then electroplate the wax copy with copper. You could then heat up the object, melting the wax away and leaving a thin copper shell - which could then be filled with molten metal of your choice, or you could just leave it as a shell and paste it into a book.

    You are on the right track. Now finish the mystery.

    Q: When does a collector become a numismatist?



    A: The year they spend more on their library than their coin collection.



    A numismatist is judged more on the content of their library than the content of their cabinet.
  • sellitstoresellitstore Posts: 2,368 ✭✭✭✭✭

    Grand Tour souvenir?

    Collector and dealer in obsolete currency. Always buying all obsolete bank notes and scrip.
  • BustDMsBustDMs Posts: 1,561 ✭✭✭✭✭

    @sellitstore said:
    Grand Tour souvenir?

    Nice thought but not correct. Go back to SAPYX’s guess and expand…..

    Another hint.

    Q: When does a collector become a numismatist?



    A: The year they spend more on their library than their coin collection.



    A numismatist is judged more on the content of their library than the content of their cabinet.
  • ConshyboyConshyboy Posts: 350 ✭✭✭✭

    Gold silver and copper leaf reproductions

  • tcollectstcollects Posts: 737 ✭✭✭✭

    I don't recognize some of those - are they really gold, silver, and copper old pressings of rare coins? what a cool thing

  • ELuisELuis Posts: 772 ✭✭✭✭

    Humphreys (Henry Noel). Ancient Coins and Medals: An historical sketch of the origin and progress of Coining money in Greece and her colonies; its progress with the extension of the Roman Empire; and its decline with the fall of that power, 2nd edition, London: Grant and Griffith, 1851, 10 sunken mounts containing 114 facsimile gold, silver and bronze foil coins (some oxidization to the facsimiles), some offsetting to text, a few leaves and mounts detached, some light spotting and small marginal ink stain, original embossed calf gilt, spine torn with loss at foot, a little rubbed with some edge wear, small 4to

  • BustDMsBustDMs Posts: 1,561 ✭✭✭✭✭

    @ELuis said:
    Humphreys (Henry Noel). Ancient Coins and Medals: An historical sketch of the origin and progress of Coining money in Greece and her colonies; its progress with the extension of the Roman Empire; and its decline with the fall of that power, 2nd edition, London: Grant and Griffith, 1851, 10 sunken mounts containing 114 facsimile gold, silver and bronze foil coins (some oxidization to the facsimiles), some offsetting to text, a few leaves and mounts detached, some light spotting and small marginal ink stain, original embossed calf gilt, spine torn with loss at foot, a little rubbed with some edge wear, small 4to

    We have a winner!

    It is one of the coolest books in my library. More images in following post.

    Q: When does a collector become a numismatist?



    A: The year they spend more on their library than their coin collection.



    A numismatist is judged more on the content of their library than the content of their cabinet.
  • BustDMsBustDMs Posts: 1,561 ✭✭✭✭✭












    Q: When does a collector become a numismatist?



    A: The year they spend more on their library than their coin collection.



    A numismatist is judged more on the content of their library than the content of their cabinet.
  • MrEurekaMrEureka Posts: 23,838 ✭✭✭✭✭

    Very cool. I’ve never seen one of those. Are they rare?

    Andy Lustig

    Doggedly collecting coins of the Central American Republic.

    Visit the Society of US Pattern Collectors at USPatterns.com.
  • sellitstoresellitstore Posts: 2,368 ✭✭✭✭✭
    edited December 21, 2023 7:05AM

    @Sapyx actually got it right when he said " Installing pages of rubbings or foil pressings in a low-print-run book was considered acceptable. Foil pressings worked better than rubbings for ancient coins, due to the high relief and uneven surfaces of a typical ancient coin." He just didn't name the book.

    His other suggestion was electrotypes and I knew that wasn't what we were looking at, but his guess of foil pressings was correct. We can see that they are in a book from the text at left in some of your scans but I didn't understand that you were looking for the title.

    And it's quite possible that a few were purchased as Grand Tour souvenirs. I might have bought one myself had I toured Europe during the 19th century.

    Collector and dealer in obsolete currency. Always buying all obsolete bank notes and scrip.
  • SmEagle1795SmEagle1795 Posts: 2,135 ✭✭✭✭✭

    That is a very neat book! I hadn't seen that before.

    Is there any additional information available on the coins which have been rubbed/imprinted? I'm wondering if the Colosseum sestertius is my example: it's not a 100% obvious exact match but it might be within the margin of error given the complexities with producing the foil copies. Some defining attributes in my eyes are the centering/shape and, more importantly, the spot of corrosion near the upper left which appears to be present in the foil as well:


    Learn about our world's shared history told through the first millennium of coinage: Colosseo Collection
  • BustDMsBustDMs Posts: 1,561 ✭✭✭✭✭

    @SmEagle1795 said:
    That is a very neat book! I hadn't seen that before.

    Is there any additional information available on the coins which have been rubbed/imprinted? I'm wondering if the Colosseum sestertius is my example: it's not a 100% obvious exact match but it might be within the margin of error given the complexities with producing the foil copies. Some defining attributes in my eyes are the centering/shape and, more importantly, the spot of corrosion near the upper left which appears to be present in the foil as well:



    It is my understanding that all the host coins were in the British Museum.

    Q: When does a collector become a numismatist?



    A: The year they spend more on their library than their coin collection.



    A numismatist is judged more on the content of their library than the content of their cabinet.
  • TwoKopeikiTwoKopeiki Posts: 9,507 ✭✭✭✭✭

    This is a very cool book. Thanks for sharing!

  • BailathaclBailathacl Posts: 1,009 ✭✭✭

    Love that (Titus?) Colosseum Sestertius — outstanding.

    "The Internet? Is that thing still around??" - Homer Simpson
  • SmEagle1795SmEagle1795 Posts: 2,135 ✭✭✭✭✭

    @BustDMs said:

    @SmEagle1795 said:
    That is a very neat book! I hadn't seen that before.

    Is there any additional information available on the coins which have been rubbed/imprinted? I'm wondering if the Colosseum sestertius is my example: it's not a 100% obvious exact match but it might be within the margin of error given the complexities with producing the foil copies. Some defining attributes in my eyes are the centering/shape and, more importantly, the spot of corrosion near the upper left which appears to be present in the foil as well:



    It is my understanding that all the host coins were in the British Museum.

    That sounds plausible: the BM's example has a similar border and was acquired in 1844. (Mine has an 1860s pedigree so I thought it could fit as well but if other coins were sourced from the BM, that makes more sense):

    Learn about our world's shared history told through the first millennium of coinage: Colosseo Collection
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