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Strange Metal Composition One Cent 1974 d

Hi all I have this One Cent 1974 with strange metal composition.
So far, I have info that the cent have been galvanized and got the metal composition as on the pictures. The weight of the coin is 2.38 gr, and the diameter is 18 mm. One expert told me that this coin is plated, acid treated and the metal composition is only on the surface of the coin and in the inside the coin is only cooper. What are your comments? Thank you for your time!



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Comments

  • Manifest_DestinyManifest_Destiny Posts: 3,041 ✭✭✭✭✭

    Magicians coin. Back half is a nickel, hammered into a real cent to created the design.

  • lcutlerlcutler Posts: 490 ✭✭✭✭

    Looks like heavy plating, maybe even a cast fake. Definitely didn't come from the mint like that.

  • rte592rte592 Posts: 1,385 ✭✭✭✭✭
    edited November 4, 2023 3:27AM

    @Manifest_Destiny said:
    Magicians coin. Back half is a nickel, hammered into a real cent to created the design.

    Na ... just your typical cent used in the chrome plating testing process.
    The Co and Cr elements are good clues
    Cobalt and Chromium

    Excellent work getting an XRF readout.

    Chrome plating is the process of applying chromium to another metal object. Chromium is the chemical element (Cr) and atomic number 24, and is an additive in steel. Chrome plating, or chromium plating, helps minimize wear and tear, as well as increase the lifespan of metal or engineering parts.

  • FrazFraz Posts: 1,550 ✭✭✭✭✭

    That’s a ‘77 D. Did you find the same damn penny that you threw out the eleventh floor window last year?

  • The coin does not attract to a magnet.

  • ChrisH821ChrisH821 Posts: 6,282 ✭✭✭✭✭

    Cast copy

    Collector, occasional seller

  • rte592rte592 Posts: 1,385 ✭✭✭✭✭
    edited November 4, 2023 8:32AM

    @Toto2334 said:
    The coin does not attract to a magnet.

    How strong is your magnet?
    You can clearly see in the image that your coin has been plated with some other metal (Look at the soft details) compared to the copper cent on the right.
    The 3 highest metal values are non magnetic.
    The XRF sheet tells you what you have... No ERROR originally came from the mint that way.

    Spend it, let someone else loose sleep over it... your time is better spent on something else.

  • rte592rte592 Posts: 1,385 ✭✭✭✭✭
    edited November 4, 2023 8:40AM

    @ChrisH821 said:
    Cast copy

    It's a type of figit tool.
    Someone went to a lot of trouble for a lucky scratch off lottery ticket tool.

    The real definitive test is
    DOES it pass through a Coinstar machine :D:D

  • TomBTomB Posts: 20,613 ✭✭✭✭✭

    With the crimped and damaged edge, could it have been plated and used in jewelry as in a keychain or pendant?

    Thomas Bush Numismatics & Numismatic Photography

    In honor of the memory of Cpl. Michael E. Thompson

    image
  • Thank you for the answers. What about the experimental planchets of 1974 and 1977. To plate a coin or something else you have to add the plate material and thus add weight - but in this coin the weight is less the normal coin, not more? What can made 95% cooper to become 38
    %?

  • IkesTIkesT Posts: 2,365 ✭✭✭✭✭
    edited January 24, 2024 8:46AM

    @Fraz said:
    That’s a ‘77 D. Did you find the same damn penny that you threw out the eleventh floor window last year?

    Deja vu all over again...

  • coinbufcoinbuf Posts: 10,620 ✭✭✭✭✭

    You have a beat up coin that was acid treated and then thrown into a chrome plating vat, worth one cent if you can get someone to accept it.

    My Lincoln Registry
    My Collection of Old Holders

    Never a slave to one plastic brand will I ever be.
  • ChrisH821ChrisH821 Posts: 6,282 ✭✭✭✭✭

    This is not an experimental planchet. It is clearly a crappy casting that someone made.
    How are you ignoring the HUGE SEAM around the edge? and porosity?
    This is a casting.
    This is a casting.
    This is a casting.
    If it was some "experimental planchet" or a foreign planchet it would still be a STUCK coin, NOT a casting.
    The only way this could more obviously be a casting is if the maker had left the sprue on it.

    Collector, occasional seller

  • Manifest_DestinyManifest_Destiny Posts: 3,041 ✭✭✭✭✭

    No matter which way the wind blows now
    Hang on to it anyhow

  • SapyxSapyx Posts: 1,966 ✭✭✭✭✭

    I would have to agree with Chris - the reason why the weight is wrong, the composition is wrong and the details of the coin are wrong, is because the coin itself is wrong. Fake. Counterfeit. A cast forgery. I would disagree with Chris, only in that there clearly is the remnants of the casting sprue, the lump of metal attached to the edge which can be seen above and to the left of the memorial on the reverse picture, and below and to the right of Abe's portrait in the obverse pics.

    The only thing stopping this from being obvious is of course the illogicality of somebody going to all that trouble, of making a casting mould and pouring a blob of molten nickel-brass, just to make a fake cent - especially since it must have been made some time after 1977, by which time cents were essentially worthless in commerce. It would have cost the forger much more than a cent to make this coin. Fake cents should not exist in 1977. The question of "what" is resolved, but the question of "why" will likely remain forever buried in the morass of illogical human behaviour.

    My best guess is that it was a newbie counterfeiter, learning the trade using a random coin from their change as the model, before trying their art on a more valuable coin.

    Waste no more time arguing what a good man should be. Be one.
    Roman emperor Marcus Aurelius, "Meditations"

    Apparently I have been awarded one DPOTD. B)
  • jmlanzafjmlanzaf Posts: 31,309 ✭✭✭✭✭

    @Toto2334 said:
    Thank you for the answers. What about the experimental planchets of 1974 and 1977. To plate a coin or something else you have to add the plate material and thus add weight - but in this coin the weight is less the normal coin, not more? What can made 95% cooper to become 38
    %?

    An XRF is surface sensitive. If it is plated, it will give you the analysis of the plating not the core.

    That said, don't you think the mushiness of the details are indicative of either casting or acid treatment?

    Look, you're convinced. Why waste everyone's time? Spend the $70 and then argue with PCGS when they tell you the same thing.

    The reason for the experimental cents in the 1970s was to make a cheaper cent. Why would they even be experimenting with copper nickel? Is there a core nickel experimental cent?

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