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1904 Canadian 5 cents with hole in it - Opinions?

Hello all. I have a 1904 Canadian 5 cent coin that someone punched a very small hole in for some unknown reason. I was wanting some opinions on the condition of the coin and to what extent the hole affects the value of the coin to collector. I would also like to know if there is anything else about the coin that is germane to value or of general interest. Thank you in advance to all who reply.



Comments

  • SapyxSapyx Posts: 1,959 ✭✭✭✭✭

    For most collectors, they do not want holed coins in their collection at all. This greatly reduces the collector value. Unless the coin is a key date rarity (and 1905 is not), then the coin's value is essentially reduced to bullion value.

    Waste no more time arguing what a good man should be. Be one.
    Roman emperor Marcus Aurelius, "Meditations"

    Apparently I have been awarded one DPOTD. B)
  • GreenstangGreenstang Posts: 716 ✭✭✭✭

    Agree with Sapyx
    The fact that it is holed and also isn’t AU, closer to EF40, makes it not worth much over bullion.

  • @Greenstang said:
    Agree with Sapyx
    The fact that it is holed and also isn’t AU, closer to EF40, makes it not worth much over bullion.

    @Greenstang said:
    Agree with Sapyx
    The fact that it is holed and also isn’t AU, closer to EF40, makes it not worth much over bullion.

    Okay good to know. 👍 Thanks for the info.

  • sylsyl Posts: 885 ✭✭✭

    The hole seems to be worn on both sides, as if it had been hanging from a chain .... a birth year?

  • @Greenstang said:
    Agree with Sapyx
    The fact that it is holed and also isn’t AU, closer to EF40, makes it not worth much over bullion.

    @Sapyx said:
    For most collectors, they do not want holed coins in their collection at all. This greatly reduces the collector value. Unless the coin is a key date rarity (and 1905 is not), then the coin's value is essentially reduced to bullion value.

    I'm curious is it possible to have something like this repaired or restored? I would think probably not for a variety of reasons but I don't know for sure. 🤷

  • GreenstangGreenstang Posts: 716 ✭✭✭✭

    It would cost more to have it restored than it is worth
    and you would still have a damaged coin.

  • @syl said:
    The hole seems to be worn on both sides, as if it had been hanging from a chain .... a birth year?

    That I can't say but my first reaction was that it looked like it was done to wear on a chain or a bracelet. I found an Australian 1963 (62?) 2 cent coin that had a metal ring around the outside with tabs folded down to secure the coin in place. The metal piece had a loop for threading a necklace through so it could be worn as pendant without damaging the coin.

  • @Greenstang said:
    It would cost more to have it restored than it is worth
    and you would still have a damaged coin.

    Oh for sure. I was just curious if it was even a thing. I wasn't sure what the laws were regarding altered or altering currency plus damage like this is probably so uncommon that there is little to no demand for the service. Especially if it does not do much to affect value.

  • SapyxSapyx Posts: 1,959 ✭✭✭✭✭

    Repairing a hole isn't illegal, though punching the hole in the first place probably was. Buying and selling a holed coin is not illegal. Repairing a hole and then selling it without telling the buyer it was holed and repaired, would be fraud (or at least attempted fraud). It is usually easy to spot a holed-and-repaired coin, but a skilful artist could do it and be barely noticeable.

    TPG restoration services will not plug holes.

    Waste no more time arguing what a good man should be. Be one.
    Roman emperor Marcus Aurelius, "Meditations"

    Apparently I have been awarded one DPOTD. B)
  • @Sapyx said:
    Repairing a hole isn't illegal, though punching the hole in the first place probably was. Buying and selling a holed coin is not illegal. Repairing a hole and then selling it without telling the buyer it was holed and repaired, would be fraud (or at least attempted fraud). It is usually easy to spot a holed-and-repaired coin, but a skilful artist could do it and be barely noticeable.

    TPG restoration services will not plug holes.

    Thank you for the information! It increases my knowledge and I appreciate it. 👍

  • davewesendavewesen Posts: 5,673 ✭✭✭✭✭

    too small to be focus in necklace .... I have seen stuff like that attached to a bracelet with a few coins

  • ELuisELuis Posts: 763 ✭✭✭✭

    @Sapyx said:

    It is usually easy to spot a holed-and-repaired coin, but a skilful artist could do it and be barely noticeable.

    Here is a sample, one Pillar 8 Reales fixed:

  • @ELuis said:

    @Sapyx said:

    It is usually easy to spot a holed-and-repaired coin, but a skilful artist could do it and be barely noticeable.

    Here is a sample, one Pillar 8 Reales fixed:

    Yeah wow. I can't see anything that stands out as a filled/repaired hole. You'd have to point to the spot for me to know. Thanks for putting up the example!

  • ELuisELuis Posts: 763 ✭✭✭✭

    @Ivanho75 said:
    Yeah wow. I can't see anything that stands out as a filled/repaired hole. You'd have to point to the spot for me to know. Thanks for putting up the example!

    It was done by a professional, see image below:

  • @ELuis said:

    @Ivanho75 said:
    Yeah wow. I can't see anything that stands out as a filled/repaired hole. You'd have to point to the spot for me to know. Thanks for putting up the example!

    It was done by a professional, see image below:

    Thanks for posting that. 👍

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