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I was this told this is a 6 1/2 tael … cece or is it sisi ?

Is that correct ?


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I give away money. I collect money.
I don’t love money . I do love the Lord God.




Comments

  • scubafuelscubafuel Posts: 1,709 ✭✭✭✭✭

    I believe it’s sycee (boat money) and you would be able to tell the taels based on weight. But I cannot help with the inscriptions!

  • SapyxSapyx Posts: 1,954 ✭✭✭✭✭

    The name given these pieces of private bullion ingots is "sycee", derived from the Cantonese pronunciation of "細絲" (sai si in Cantonese, xi si in Mandarin), which means "fine silk". The Chinese themselves usually called these pieces "元寶 " (yuan bao), meaning "primary money". "銀鋌" (yin ding) or "silver collar" is a more specific Chinese name for silver sycee ingots.

    This particular form of sycee is distinctive of southern Yunnan Province and neighbouring VIetnam, in the period 1884-1914, and is known in the West as "saddle money" due to the distinctive saddle-like shape; in Chinese they are called "牌坊鋌" (pai fang ding) or "gateway collar", due the the resemblance of the design to a traditional Chinese Pai Fang gateway.

    For the denomination, you'll have to weigh it to be sure. The Yunnan tael weighed about 36 grams. 5 taels (about 180 grams) is a typical denomination for a saddle money ingot.

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  • bidaskbidask Posts: 13,811 ✭✭✭✭✭

    @Sapyx said:
    The name given these pieces of private bullion ingots is "sycee", derived from the Cantonese pronunciation of "細絲" (sai si in Cantonese, xi si in Mandarin), which means "fine silk". The Chinese themselves usually called these pieces "元寶 " (yuan bao), meaning "primary money". "銀鋌" (yin ding) or "silver collar" is a more specific Chinese name for silver sycee ingots.

    This particular form of sycee is distinctive of southern Yunnan Province and neighbouring VIetnam, in the period 1884-1914, and is known in the West as "saddle money" due to the distinctive saddle-like shape; in Chinese they are called "牌坊鋌" (pai fang ding) or "gateway collar", due the the resemblance of the design to a traditional Chinese Pai Fang gateway.

    For the denomination, you'll have to weigh it to be sure. The Yunnan tael weighed about 36 grams. 5 taels (about 180 grams) is a typical denomination for a saddle money ingot.

    Thank you very much !

    I manage money. I earn money. I save money .
    I give away money. I collect money.
    I don’t love money . I do love the Lord God.




  • bosoxbosox Posts: 1,497 ✭✭✭✭

    That is why this forum is terrific. Many extremely knowledgeable folks here.

    Numismatic author & owner of the Uncommon Cents collections. 2011 Fred Bowman award winner, 2020 J. Douglas Ferguson award winner, & 2022 Paul Fiocca award winner.

    http://www.victoriancent.com
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