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Certify or keep my Dansco hole plugged?

I want to certify my most expensive Canadian silver dollar, but I don’t want to leave an open spot in my Dansco album. What to do?

Comments

  • StorkStork Posts: 5,205 ✭✭✭✭✭

    Maybe not helpful, but if this is a pricey/nice coin perhaps get it certified or otherwise protected. Then put an alternative coin in the album.

    For years I had a seriously chopped up yen in my 'trade dollar' spot in my Japan Type Dansco. No way was I planning on putting that expensive of a coin in the album. My excuse was the yen certainly functioned in trade! Though as the years went by some nicer coins did end up there but my nicest ended up being a slabbed type set (no the MS-65 1870 flashy white yen was NOT going in the album) and I got to have the album looking complete...I hated an empty slot there.

    Eventually I found a problem trade dollar and put it in the album so problem solved.

    In any case do you have an alternative dollar you can put in the album as a place holder, but still get the nicest one certified?


  • 1960NYGiants1960NYGiants Posts: 3,441 ✭✭✭✭

    IMHO - that 1948 should be slabbed. Although it looks authentic in your pics, there are more fakes than real ones out there.

    After it's slabbed, print the Tru-View to scale, cut out, glue to thin cardboard, put in Dansco.

    Gene

    Life member #369 of the Royal Canadian Numismatic Association
    Member of Canadian Association of Token Collectors

    Collector of:
    Canadian coins and pre-confederation tokens
    Darkside proof/mint sets dated 1960
    My Ebay
  • coinkatcoinkat Posts: 22,681 ✭✭✭✭✭

    I have one of these Capitol plastic set holders for Canadian Dollars- it has been a fun project. My 1948 is slabbed- so for the 1948 slot I just added a second 1949 with the portrait showing on the front side so at least there is a coin in the slot... I see it as creative problem solving

    Experience the World through Numismatics...it's more than you can imagine.

  • @1960NYGiants said:
    IMHO - that 1948 should be slabbed. Although it looks authentic in your pics, there are more fakes than real ones out there.

    After it's slabbed, print the Tru-View to scale, cut out, glue to thin cardboard, put in Dansco.

    Great idea! I bought this from a dealer who died a long time ago (when he was still alive, that is). I have no recourse should it be fake.

    If I could find a really good fake with COPY stamped on it, I’d use it as a filler if it were inexpensive.

  • MrEurekaMrEureka Posts: 23,837 ✭✭✭✭✭

    Is there a good reason to slab it now and not wait until it's time to sell it?

    Andy Lustig

    Doggedly collecting coins of the Central American Republic.

    Visit the Society of US Pattern Collectors at USPatterns.com.
  • @MrEureka said:
    Is there a good reason to slab it now and not wait until it's time to sell it?

    I’d like to slab my more valuable pieces should I meet my death and my survivors need to sell my collection. As it is, I can imagine my wife bringing the whole album to a dealer and being told, “I’ll give you $500 for the lot.”

  • MrEurekaMrEureka Posts: 23,837 ✭✭✭✭✭

    @shirohniichan2 said:

    @MrEureka said:
    Is there a good reason to slab it now and not wait until it's time to sell it?

    I’d like to slab my more valuable pieces should I meet my death and my survivors need to sell my collection. As it is, I can imagine my wife bringing the whole album to a dealer and being told, “I’ll give you $500 for the lot.”

    I hate to be the bearer of bad news, but dealers have also been known to make low offers on slabs! 😮

    Not that I don’t slab many of my coins for similar reasons. But my rationale has more to do with getting the coin in the right holder, which isn’t always easy, and which can sometimes make a huge difference in the price. But in the case of your coin, I don’t see much risk in leaving it raw.

    Andy Lustig

    Doggedly collecting coins of the Central American Republic.

    Visit the Society of US Pattern Collectors at USPatterns.com.
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