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Saint Pierre & Miquelon 5 Francs Banknotes 1950-60

World currency is not at all my foray so just trying to get a handle on a few things I've run across. This collection hasn't been touched in more than 30 years and I've been given the daunting task of going thru it.

So have some of these 5 francs Saint-Pierre & Miquelon that are very nice. Crispy, if not just a bit wavy but feels like that is due to the printing. Wanted to know if someone that has some knowledge with this can confirm this is typical. The paper is thin.. almost like rice paper but does have the correct watermarks so I feel they are good.

Also, pricing seems all over the place. $20-60 for what appears to be the same quality of notes. It doesn't appear that grading them would be very beneficial either most appear to be unc. Here's one of them... not sure if a serial number like that has any significance in the world currency market or not, either. Oh yeah, the kicker... I have 10 of them consecutive serial numbered.

Thanks in advance!


Comments

  • JBKJBK Posts: 14,510 ✭✭✭✭✭
    edited May 11, 2023 1:57AM

    All I can add is that from a pre-euro trip to Paris I recall that French banknote paper was different than most, so I'm sure yours are OK.

    Nice notes.

  • Serial_no_8Serial_no_8 Posts: 414 ✭✭✭

    I have 10 of them consecutive serial numbered.

    It is **P-22 ** (Pick # code), made from thin paper & they all appear well centred & in great shape. Congrats!

    First: consecutive serial # don't add value to the notes (not sure where/why/how this myth came about). That's just the way they were issued. (a very small faction of coin collectors still chase 2-3 consecutive but usually TPG notes). In fact, you're better off not revealing that you have 10 consecutive notes b/c that makes it appear as if the notes are more common than they are (they aren't uncommon -if you check out the Numista Rarity Index of 49 + the fact that 7 collectors are willing to trade P-22: a NRI score of 80+ would be considered tough). Since the 5 Franc is such a low value note, many were stashed away, in great condition but demand keeps their price healthy. They're a nice run of numbers but not special # -yet there may be a collector out there attracted to the string of 6's (on last note).

    Second: be sure to store them in decent (PVC Free) currency sleeves if you haven't already done so. Keep them in a dry place (like your coins).

    Sold together, I would expect $30 each but individually, you could get more $40-$60 perhaps (especially the ones in the best shape).

  • PROMETHIUS88PROMETHIUS88 Posts: 2,819 ✭✭✭✭✭

    First: consecutive serial # don't add value to the notes (not sure where/why/how this myth came about). That's just the way they were issued. (a very small faction of coin collectors still chase 2-3 consecutive but usually TPG notes). In fact, you're better off not revealing that you have 10 consecutive notes b/c that makes it appear as if the notes are more common than they are (they aren't uncommon -if you check out the Numista Rarity Index of 49 + the fact that 7 collectors are willing to trade P-22: a NRI score of 80+ would be considered tough). Since the 5 Franc is such a low value note, many were stashed away, in great condition but demand keeps their price healthy. They're a nice run of numbers but not special # -yet there may be a collector out there attracted to the string of 6's (on last note).

    Second: be sure to store them in decent (PVC Free) currency sleeves if you haven't already done so. Keep them in a dry place (like your coins).

    Sold together, I would expect $30 each but individually, you could get more $40-$60 perhaps (especially the ones in the best shape).

    Thank you... that makes a lot of sense. This was a collection my wife's grandfathers who passed in 1991. My mother-in-law has been sitting on all of this stuff for over 10 years herself... since her mother passed. I think the majority of the US stuff was pilfered by other family members shortly after he passed and they just left the foreign coins and paper money, took what they thought had value.

    He put a lot of currency into plastic sheets and binders...which over the years has done damage to many notes. Thankfully, these, and many others, were just in a pile, in a box. Like he never got around to putting them in a binder.

    Anyhow, thank you again for your insight and response!

  • Serial_no_8Serial_no_8 Posts: 414 ✭✭✭

    thank you again for your insight and response!

    No problem as I'm a big fan of these notes myself. I have watched many go for auction in the past 5 years.

    Here's mine:

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