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Yahoo! News - "Roman coin was buried for 2,000 years in Poland" Metal detector find

Moira Ritter
Wed, May 10, 2023 at 1:24 PM EDT



Krzysztof Kozłowski was using his metal detector to search for artifacts in Poland when he came across something extraordinary.

Buried near the Vistula River in Józefów, a silver coin with serrated edges and inscriptions on its front and back was unearthed by Kozlowski, according to a May 4 Facebook post from Lublin Provincial Conservator of Monuments.

Now, experts have identified the small coin as a 2,000-year-old Roman denarius, officials said. Using the coin’s inscriptions, it was determined that the relic dates to about 81 B.C.

On the front side of the coin is a bust of Ceres, the Roman goddess of vegetation and harvest, according to the conservator. Below Ceres’ chin is an unspecified object, but experts think it could have been a cornucopia or ear of corn.


continued in link...... https://news.yahoo.com/roman-coin-buried-2-000-172426380.html

Comments

  • 7Jaguars7Jaguars Posts: 7,181 ✭✭✭✭✭

    That would be exciting to find. This coin looks to have circulated for a good while, so perhaps lost a bit later?

    Love that Milled British (1830-1960)
    Well, just Love coins, period.
  • SimonWSimonW Posts: 555 ✭✭✭✭✭

    I was thinking the same thing, it may not have been lost around the time of minting.

    I'm BACK!!! Used to be Billet7 on the old forum.

  • John ConduittJohn Conduitt Posts: 346 ✭✭✭

    It's odd that this is news. This must happen every couple of minutes.

    It could've circulated for 100 years or more. The fact that it was in Poland is probably because the tribes there traded with the people in the Roman Empire. Or they looted it.

  • SapyxSapyx Posts: 1,959 ✭✭✭✭✭

    Well, it was found in Poland, which is well outside of Roman territory. Finding Roman Republic coins there would be much rarer than finding them in, say, France.

    We do know that a couple of centuries later, the barbarian tribes of Germania preferred payment in serrated denarii, because they knew those older coins were higher fineness than the then-current coins. So I'd agree that the coin may be 2100 years old, but the burial may have been 1800-1900 years ago.

    Waste no more time arguing what a good man should be. Be one.
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  • 82FootballWaxMemorys82FootballWaxMemorys Posts: 1,258 ✭✭✭✭✭

    @Goldbully said:
    Moira Ritter
    Wed, May 10, 2023 at 1:24 PM EDT



    Krzysztof Kozłowski was using his metal detector to search for artifacts in Poland when he came across something extraordinary.

    Buried near the Vistula River in Józefów, a silver coin with serrated edges and inscriptions on its front and back was unearthed by Kozlowski, according to a May 4 Facebook post from Lublin Provincial Conservator of Monuments.

    Now, experts have identified the small coin as a 2,000-year-old Roman denarius, officials said. Using the coin’s inscriptions, it was determined that the relic dates to about 81 B.C.

    On the front side of the coin is a bust of Ceres, the Roman goddess of vegetation and harvest, according to the conservator. Below Ceres’ chin is an unspecified object, but experts think it could have been a cornucopia or ear of corn.


    continued in link...... https://news.yahoo.com/roman-coin-buried-2-000-172426380.html

    Corn is indigenous to the "New World", thus it's not that :)

    Unless otherwise specified my posts represent only my opinion, not fact.

  • John ConduittJohn Conduitt Posts: 346 ✭✭✭

    @Sapyx said:
    Well, it was found in Poland, which is well outside of Roman territory. Finding Roman Republic coins there would be much rarer than finding them in, say, France.

    We do know that a couple of centuries later, the barbarian tribes of Germania preferred payment in serrated denarii, because they knew those older coins were higher fineness than the then-current coins. So I'd agree that the coin may be 2100 years old, but the burial may have been 1800-1900 years ago.

    A Republic denarius from 81BC found in northern Gaul or Britain would also be an import, since the Romans didn't go there until 55BC and AD43 respectively. Britain was further outside Roman territory in 81BC than Poland. But trade was flourishing long before that - Britain imported Roman and Greek coins from around 200BC and there are plenty found that didn't come over with the Roman army. The Celts sold metals, slaves, grain, livestock etc to the Romans and bought wine, jewellery and bronze. Tribes from places like Denmark also had significant trade with the Romans.

    I even have several Roman and Greek coins from 260-100BC found in Britain that would've been 150-300 years old during the Roman conquest. It didn't matter to them that they were Roman and Greek since the value was in the metal, although interestingly bronze coins were used widely. Some Republic denarii undoubetdly arrived after the conquest (very worn) but very many came beforehand.

    Lucius Postumius Albinus Denarius, 131BC

    Rome. Silver, 18mm, 3.57g. Helmeted head of Roma right, apex behind, mark of value below chin. Mars driving galloping quadriga right, holding trophy, shield, and spear; L POST ALB/ROMA (RRC/Crawford 252/1). Found near Lavenham, Suffolk, in 2018. Portable Antiquities Scheme: SF-C5FD5D.

  • 82FootballWaxMemorys82FootballWaxMemorys Posts: 1,258 ✭✭✭✭✭

    @Goldbully said:
    Moira Ritter
    Wed, May 10, 2023 at 1:24 PM EDT



    Krzysztof Kozłowski was using his metal detector to search for artifacts in Poland when he came across something extraordinary.

    Buried near the Vistula River in Józefów, a silver coin with serrated edges and inscriptions on its front and back was unearthed by Kozlowski, according to a May 4 Facebook post from Lublin Provincial Conservator of Monuments.

    Now, experts have identified the small coin as a 2,000-year-old Roman denarius, officials said. Using the coin’s inscriptions, it was determined that the relic dates to about 81 B.C.

    On the front side of the coin is a bust of Ceres, the Roman goddess of vegetation and harvest, according to the conservator. Below Ceres’ chin is an unspecified object, but experts think it could have been a cornucopia or ear of corn.


    continued in link...... https://news.yahoo.com/roman-coin-buried-2-000-172426380.html

    Corn is indigenous to the "New World" thus it can't be that :)

    Unless otherwise specified my posts represent only my opinion, not fact.

  • John ConduittJohn Conduitt Posts: 346 ✭✭✭

    @82FootballWaxMemorys said:

    Corn is indigenous to the "New World" thus it can't be that :)

    I can't tell what it is meant to be, but in the UK, corn is wheat.

  • 82FootballWaxMemorys82FootballWaxMemorys Posts: 1,258 ✭✭✭✭✭

    @John Conduitt said:

    @82FootballWaxMemorys said:

    Corn is indigenous to the "New World" thus it can't be that :)

    I can't tell what it is meant to be, but in the UK, corn is wheat.

    never knew that.

    Unless otherwise specified my posts represent only my opinion, not fact.

  • 82FootballWaxMemorys82FootballWaxMemorys Posts: 1,258 ✭✭✭✭✭

    @Goldbully said:
    Moira Ritter
    Wed, May 10, 2023 at 1:24 PM EDT



    Krzysztof Kozłowski was using his metal detector to search for artifacts in Poland when he came across something extraordinary.

    Buried near the Vistula River in Józefów, a silver coin with serrated edges and inscriptions on its front and back was unearthed by Kozlowski, according to a May 4 Facebook post from Lublin Provincial Conservator of Monuments.

    Now, experts have identified the small coin as a 2,000-year-old Roman denarius, officials said. Using the coin’s inscriptions, it was determined that the relic dates to about 81 B.C.

    On the front side of the coin is a bust of Ceres, the Roman goddess of vegetation and harvest, according to the conservator. Below Ceres’ chin is an unspecified object, but experts think it could have been a cornucopia or ear of corn.


    continued in link...... https://news.yahoo.com/roman-coin-buried-2-000-172426380.html

    Corn is indigenous to the "New World" thus it's not that :)

    Unless otherwise specified my posts represent only my opinion, not fact.

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