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Wanted: opc baseball

Poum1966Poum1966 Posts: 3

hi !!! looking for some 1972 opc baseball cards in nm+++ condition. i HAVE some dups if you want to trade..
thanks!!!

Comments

  • craig44craig44 Posts: 10,268 ✭✭✭✭✭

    @Poum1966 said:
    hi !!! looking for some 1972 opc baseball cards in nm+++ condition. i HAVE some dups if you want to trade..
    thanks!!!

    may want to move this to b/s/t

    George Brett, Bobby Orr and Terry Bradshaw.

  • olb31olb31 Posts: 2,869 ✭✭✭✭✭

    just picked up a 1978 geronimo from you yesterday. i have all the others. need to upgrade reggie, carl and rice. if you have other centered ones let me know. the geronimo was the best i have seen.

    Work hard and you will succeed!!
  • Plowman007Plowman007 Posts: 1
    edited February 18, 2023 3:03PM

    Looking for any info on 1989 world series earthquake game. I know of a Francisco Giants team signed game ball.
    I'll try to get pic of it. Scott Garrelts had team sign it and gave it to his nephew.

  • coolstanleycoolstanley Posts: 2,385 ✭✭✭✭✭

    I cant figure out why early 80's OPC baseball cards get almost no love, when they are extremely rare compared to topps?

    Terry Bradshaw was AMAZING!!

    Ignore list -Basebal21

  • PaulMaulPaulMaul Posts: 4,674 ✭✭✭✭✭

    @coolstanley said:
    I cant figure out why early 80's OPC baseball cards get almost no love, when they are extremely rare compared to topps?

    I can only speak for myself, and I know this opinion will be unpopular with many here.

    I have no nostalgia for OPC, and I find the rough cuts esthetically unappealing. I do find variations from the Topps sets interesting, but not enough that I want to collect them.

  • BaltimoreYankeeBaltimoreYankee Posts: 2,888 ✭✭✭✭✭

    @PaulMaul said:

    @coolstanley said:
    I cant figure out why early 80's OPC baseball cards get almost no love, when they are extremely rare compared to topps?

    I can only speak for myself, and I know this opinion will be unpopular with many here.

    I have no nostalgia for OPC, and I find the rough cuts esthetically unappealing. I do find variations from the Topps sets interesting, but not enough that I want to collect them.

    Speaking just for myself, I like the charm of the OC / rough cuts of OPC (but not Topps!) but my collecting interests only go through 1975 or so. No interest in early '80's for me (in other words, I'm old).

    Daniel
  • olb31olb31 Posts: 2,869 ✭✭✭✭✭

    The likeability of a set, whether it's Drake's cakes or Topps or OPC, really is kind of inconsequential. The importance lies in collectibility.

    1989 Donruss is an awesome looking set to me. My fav of 1989. (throw Upper deck in there too). But way too many exist. Once there are around 5,000 Psa 10's of card, I find that card uncollectible. At least for Investment purposes.

    I think the 1976 Topps Baseball set is very bland. But finding nice copies of Aaron, Brett, Rice, Etc. is very difficult. I find this set much more collectible. I would much rather have a 50/50 centered PSA 8 Brett than a 1989 Upper Deck Griffey PSA 10. Much rarer too find.

    I grade a lot of cards, but rarely grade Randy Johnson, Ken Griffey Jr rookies due to the over abundance of the supply. I like both players, but there is little challenge to finding a 10.

    Work hard and you will succeed!!
  • PaulMaulPaulMaul Posts: 4,674 ✭✭✭✭✭

    @olb31 That perspective only makes sense to me if you are getting cards graded to sell. I collect what I like. Some of it is rare, some of it is pretty common.

    And with things like Candy Lids and other inserts/test sets, the rarity is offset by a commensurate lack of demand. The same is somewhat true of OPC. So I guess it depends on what drives your collecting.

  • olb31olb31 Posts: 2,869 ✭✭✭✭✭

    @PaulMaul said:
    @olb31 That perspective only makes sense to me if you are getting cards graded to sell. I collect what I like. Some of it is rare, some of it is pretty common.

    And with things like Candy Lids and other inserts/test sets, the rarity is offset by a commensurate lack of demand. The same is somewhat true of OPC. So I guess it depends on what drives your collecting.

    No doubt. I totally agree. That's why I said what I did, doesn't matter if the set is pretty, is old, or whatever, but it makes little sense to me to want to pay $1,800 for something that there is a plethora of, even if it looks good or is trendy or whatever. But $1,800 for me might be $18 dollars to you. I'm an accountant so I look at life at what makes the most dollars and sense. I could not advise a client to invest in crytpo currency just because it's trendy. Too many unknowns for me. But someone might and make a killing.

    i like Bazooka cards, Star Trek Cards, WWE cards, i don't care, just what makes sense (not a losing proposition) to collect with a budget. If you like a 1975 Topps Pete Rose, no reason not to like a 1975 OPC Pete Rose or 1975 Kelloggs Pete Rose, etc.

    I am putting together a 1977 gray back raw basketball set. PSA doesn't recognize it as a variation, but I know it is, so I'm going to do it. i usually don't put raw sets together, but why limit myself to same old same old.

    Work hard and you will succeed!!
  • PaulMaulPaulMaul Posts: 4,674 ✭✭✭✭✭

    @olb31 said: If you like a 1975 Topps Pete Rose, no reason not to like a 1975 OPC Pete Rose or 1975 Kelloggs Pete Rose, etc.

    Again, it comes down to what appeals to you about owning a card. This makes sense for player collectors who just love Pete Rose and enjoy owning any of his cards. On the other hand, I would love to have a beautiful PSA 9 75 Topps Rose. I could not care less about any of his other cards, that includes mini, OPC, Kellog’s, etc. They have no nostalgia to me, and unlike you, that is the majority of my collecting drive.

    Chaque un a son gout! 👍

  • BaltimoreYankeeBaltimoreYankee Posts: 2,888 ✭✭✭✭✭

    I guessed correctly! (that Chaque un a son gout means 'to each his own' :-)
    A great OPC touch

    Daniel
  • olb31olb31 Posts: 2,869 ✭✭✭✭✭

    Chaque un a son gout!

    Awesome!!! Nice, phrase. Is that Klingon? LOL!!

    Work hard and you will succeed!!
  • olb31olb31 Posts: 2,869 ✭✭✭✭✭

    @coolstanley said:
    I cant figure out why early 80's OPC baseball cards get almost no love, when they are extremely rare compared to topps?

    I have picked up some nice ones in the last year. I sent a few off to PSA the other day. Mainly 1978 - 1981. I did pick up a 1975 Nolan ryan opc psa 7 the other day. paid $200, but man you never see them if that high of grade. Felt lucky it was still on ebay.

    Work hard and you will succeed!!
  • BBBrkrrBBBrkrr Posts: 910 ✭✭✭✭✭

    @olb31 said:
    The likeability of a set, whether it's Drake's cakes or Topps or OPC, really is kind of inconsequential. The importance lies in collectibility.

    1989 Donruss is an awesome looking set to me. My fav of 1989. (throw Upper deck in there too). But way too many exist. Once there are around 5,000 Psa 10's of card, I find that card uncollectible. At least for Investment purposes.

    I think the 1976 Topps Baseball set is very bland. But finding nice copies of Aaron, Brett, Rice, Etc. is very difficult. I find this set much more collectible. I would much rather have a 50/50 centered PSA 8 Brett than a 1989 Upper Deck Griffey PSA 10. Much rarer too find.

    I grade a lot of cards, but rarely grade Randy Johnson, Ken Griffey Jr rookies due to the over abundance of the supply. I like both players, but there is little challenge to finding a 10.

    I agree with all that except your hate of the 76 set. B) I LOVE that set. Love the colors, photos, graphic design. All of it.

    I'm the same way on grading much after about 1982. I just don't do it and don't chase it.

  • olb31olb31 Posts: 2,869 ✭✭✭✭✭

    1976 and 1979 are a little plain. but i love the trophy cards, carter, lynn, rice.

    Work hard and you will succeed!!
  • johfrjohfr Posts: 89 ✭✭✭

    O-Pee-Chee baseball (1965-1990) has seen a pretty significant increase in value over the past few years. I believe OPC baseball will continue to increase in popularity. If you look at the population there is very little supply.

    Prior to 1981 you don't really have much to collect if you are looking for specific players or teams. Let's use Thurman Munson as an example. If you want to collect Munson cards from during his career you are pretty limited to Topps, OPC, SSPC and a few odd ball special Topps issues. The Topps regular issue stuff is generally plentiful. Adding OPC to your collection seems likely. The available supply of OPC cards is so low that just a few collectors doing this would drive the price up. I'm sure we can all come up with lots of popular players from the late 60's and 70's that this is the case with.

    The other issue is the quality of the cards. OPC baseball in general had very poor quality (poorly cut, poorly centered, lots of printing flaws). Finding high end (8 or better) cards is damn near impossible in many of these years. Just try to put together a 1974 OPC Baseball set, it'll cost you a fortune in money and time searching.

    Whatever you collect (or invest in) enjoy!

  • @johfr said:

    "Just try to put together a 1974 OPC Baseball set, it'll cost you a fortune in money and time searching."

    I've been collecting '70s to early '80s OPC baseball almost exclusively over the past 10 years or so and about two years ago decided to focus on '74 HOFers because of the challenge of doing so. Since then, I've acquired two PSA 9's (both pop 1, no 10's), five PSA 8's, one SGC 8, one PSA 8 OC (highest graded), one PSA 7, two PSA 5's (both of which I believe warrant 9 OC), and quite a few raw cards that I plan to grade (including what I hope will be the first Fisk PSA 8 NQ). One of several that I bid on but did not win was Marichal PSA 8 (pop 1, none higher) which sold for about $1,500! I even picked up a PSA 10 common (only 45 exist) because it actually looks like it deserves the grade unlike many 10's from this and other sets of this era. I'm 55 and probably won't be able to complete this subset in PSA 8 or better (or as close as is possible since 7 or 8 OC is currently the best available for some) during my lifetime but I will certainly enjoy the challenge of trying!

  • lahmejoonlahmejoon Posts: 1,663 ✭✭✭

    I also prefer Topps over OPC because of what I collected as a kid and was never a fan of the rough cut. BUT, I really like OPC card backs. Some had much more interesting designs (1971 baseball) AND they are much easier to read that their Topps counterparts.

  • balco758balco758 Posts: 1,301 ✭✭✭✭✭

    Me love O-Pee-Chee.....used to rip Steve's 77 and 78 boxes when they were a few hundred each and so much fun.....

  • SlipCSlipC Posts: 99 ✭✭✭

    Beautiful Bench cards!

    I'm looking for high grade 1984 OPC myself.

    It's been a long, long time!
  • 19541954 Posts: 2,866 ✭✭✭

    1974 OPC is tough. My set is about 60% exmt with 25% nrmt or better. Centering is brutal for this set in general with many over sized cards.

    Looking for high grade rookie cards and unopened boxes/cases
  • @1954 said:
    1974 OPC is tough. My set is about 60% exmt with 25% nrmt or better. Centering is brutal for this set in general with many over sized cards.

    you can say that again, we opened a box about 15 years ago and this was the worst of all the boxes we opened from 73-80. very few cards that were even remotely close to PSA 7ish centering

  • smallstockssmallstocks Posts: 1,579 ✭✭✭

    For anyone interested in 1972 OPC, I have 49 PSA 9 cards listed on ebay, most very low pops. I would be happy to discount for any purchases done directly with me.


    Late 60's and early to mid 70's non-sports
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