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I was a buyer at around $20 spot but not too interested at current levels.

DNADaveDNADave Posts: 7,238 ✭✭✭✭✭
edited March 29, 2022 3:59PM in Precious Metals

So I’m not really looking to buy but may have an opportunity on $500 face in 90% halves (1000 coins). If your still buying, where would you offering? eBay looks like they’d sell for $12,000.
I don’t think I could be comfortable offering more than 10,000 and might even want to be back of that.

I know most are reluctant to say but it’s just a discussion.

Comments

  • RobMRobM Posts: 528 ✭✭✭

    If someone was selling halves at 20x right now I would be a strong buyer. I think my local bullion dealer is paying more than that today, and selling 90% halves at around 23.7x. Can you send me a PM with your prospective seller's contact info so that I can test whether a 20x offer would be accepted? :)

  • JimTylerJimTyler Posts: 3,004 ✭✭✭✭✭
    edited March 29, 2022 4:32PM

    Why would you pay the same price you could buy it for elsewhere ($12k) ? $10k sounds fair to me if they’re not worn out. I’d try a little less too.

  • blitzdudeblitzdude Posts: 5,303 ✭✭✭✭✭

    $9K, I know there are people that would currently pay more but that's not me. RGDS!

    The whole worlds off its rocker, buy Gold™.

  • rte592rte592 Posts: 1,387 ✭✭✭✭✭

    Condition (meat on the bone) would be a factor.
    What type of halves also a factor.
    20x is a good number now days.
    Testing the water at 18x you can negotiate from there.

  • bronco2078bronco2078 Posts: 9,961 ✭✭✭✭✭

    unless you own a shop i don't see less than 20x face on the horizon. If spot drops sellers will just put the stuff away

  • roadrunnerroadrunner Posts: 28,303 ✭✭✭✭✭

    @DNADave said:
    So I’m not really looking to buy but may have an opportunity on $500 face in 90% halves (1000 coins). If your still buying, where would you offering? eBay looks like they’d sell for $12,000.
    I don’t think I could be comfortable offering more than 10,000 and might even want to be back of that.

    How much will it matter when silver eventually gets back to around $50 if the next couple of years....and probably sooner. Next time it pushes above $30 there's not much in the way to prevent into the $40's. Gold has already taken out the 2011. Oil made it back to 87% of the 2008 high. There's really nothing keeping silver from making it back to near 2011 levels. With a GSR of 78, it's getting near the time for that ratio to revisit the "normal" range of 45-65. And before this current run of silver is done GSR will retrace to the 16-35 range yet again.....possibly even lower.

    Considering that gold has a chart pattern projecting to $3000+ , you can figure silver will get to $55 with a 55 GSR......$66 on a 45 GSR.....$86 on a 35 GSR. I won't even mention lower GSR's or higher gold price points as not to get Cohodk's tights in a bind. Yes, there could still be significant pull back in PM's before any of this happens. If your horizon is 3-6 yrs what's the difference? In 3-6 yrs the stock and RE markets will likely be far off the recent record highs. Remember how the 1966-1980 period worked? It wasn't pretty for stocks and RE.

    Barbarous Relic No More, LSCC -GoldSeek--shadow stats--SafeHaven--321gold
  • derrybderryb Posts: 36,033 ✭✭✭✭✭
    edited April 3, 2022 4:50AM

    There's a new sheriff in shiny town. A major player just linked his currency to gold and is requiring payments for his oil/gas exports to Europe be made with HIS currency. His exports alone will drive gold higher. PM markets about to get turned downside up.

    The decline from democracy to tyranny is both a natural and inevitable one.

  • GoldenageGoldenage Posts: 3,278 ✭✭✭✭✭
    edited April 3, 2022 8:16AM

    @derryb said:
    There's a new sheriff in shiny town. A major player just linked his currency to gold and is requiring payments for his oil/gas exports to Europe be made with HIS currency. His exports alone will drive gold higher. PM markets about to get turned downside up.

    Oil could be worth less in 10-20 years as China and the USA switches to EVs. Not saying it will but be careful.

  • HigashiyamaHigashiyama Posts: 2,133 ✭✭✭✭✭

    “Sheriff” is a somewhat unfortunate metaphor for a guy who will likely be in front of a war crimes tribunal within a decade, assuming he is still alive.

    In any case, autocrats with delusions of grandeur always lose (often creating havoc along the way)

    We will almost certainly see an accelerated rethinking of global monetary arrangements. Russia, however, is in absolutely no position to dictate, or even participate in, the discussions.

    Xi Jinging’s recent comments in discussions with European leaders were quite interesting.

    Higashiyama
  • bronco2078bronco2078 Posts: 9,961 ✭✭✭✭✭

    @Higashiyama said:
    “Sheriff” is a somewhat unfortunate metaphor for a guy who will likely be in front of a war crimes tribunal within a decade, assuming he is still alive.

    In any case, autocrats with delusions of grandeur always lose (often creating havoc along the way)

    We will almost certainly see an accelerated rethinking of global monetary arrangements. Russia, however, is in absolutely no position to dictate, or even participate in, the discussions.

    Xi Jinging’s recent comments in discussions with European leaders were quite interesting.

    who goes in front of a war crimes tribunal depends only on the final score. Seems like they executed a lot of Japanese and Germans after WW2 but those on the winning side flash frying a quarter million people here or there didn't result in any charges . Being on the losing side makes you guilty automatically and makes your civilians fair game for pretty much anything.

  • derrybderryb Posts: 36,033 ✭✭✭✭✭
    edited April 3, 2022 10:47AM

    lol. and he's different than the local sheriffs' plundering exploits. funny how we get to play by a different set of rules. Russia has returned gold to its role of money. Russia is creating the discussions. Money will not be the same because of its responses to sanctions.

    The decline from democracy to tyranny is both a natural and inevitable one.

  • blitzdudeblitzdude Posts: 5,303 ✭✭✭✭✭

    @derryb said:
    lol. and he's different than the local sheriffs' plundering exploits. funny how we get to play by a different set of rules. Russia has returned gold to its role of money. Russia is creating the discussions. Money will not be the same because of its responses to sanctions.

    You should pack up the bunker and move on over there. Take Julius with you as well. THKS!

    The whole worlds off its rocker, buy Gold™.

  • thefinnthefinn Posts: 2,652 ✭✭✭✭✭

    @Goldenage said:

    @derryb said:
    There's a new sheriff in shiny town. A major player just linked his currency to gold and is requiring payments for his oil/gas exports to Europe be made with HIS currency. His exports alone will drive gold higher. PM markets about to get turned downside up.

    Oil could be worth less in 10-20 years as China and the USA switches to EVs. Not saying it will but be careful.

    If that were true, then why is China building more coal-burning power plants. You may have more EVs, but you've still got to make the electricity. Not enough wind or surface area on the earth to power sun-using panels. If you are a scientist, you understand that the stuff the media puts out is a pipe-dream.

    thefinn
  • bronco2078bronco2078 Posts: 9,961 ✭✭✭✭✭

    the answer to global warming is to sell your waterfront property and move to a higher elevation. Simple really go up about 50 feet and you should be dry until you die.

    Take a look at a contour map . I burned about 2 tons of coal this winter heating my garage and I'm not Chinese coal is cheap and useful and easy to store. I pile it up outside rain doesnt bother it unlike firewood and the idea it might help keep the next generation warm is a bonus :D

  • TwoSides2aCoinTwoSides2aCoin Posts: 43,760 ✭✭✭✭✭
    edited April 15, 2022 6:31AM

    Timing is almost everything. Then, there is opportunity, along with affordability. Acquisition (stacking) is a long strategic game. Waiting doesn't help if the premiums keep it ( silver) above $30. And they ( premiums) continue to rise. So your key is : availability. 24 times face is about right. I sold some the other day at 22x face, Just to compete with a competitor selling at 21.1. Of course the buyer told me he ( the other dealer) ran out, at that price

    To Russia , with earth metals.

  • bronco2078bronco2078 Posts: 9,961 ✭✭✭✭✭

    i was a buyer of gasoline at $2 a gallon , $4.20 is too much I'll refuse to drive that will show them :D

  • TwoSides2aCoinTwoSides2aCoin Posts: 43,760 ✭✭✭✭✭
    edited April 5, 2022 7:55AM

    @bronco2078 said:
    i was a buyer of gasoline at $2 a gallon , $4.20 is too much I'll refuse to drive that will show them :D

    If you compare a silver quarter's value to a gallon of gas, you find gas is about $.25 per gallon.

  • tincuptincup Posts: 4,724 ✭✭✭✭✭

    " If you compare a silver quarter's value to a gallon of gas, you find gas is about $.25 per gallon. "

    With that perspective... doesn't make gasoline look so bad price wise. A good example of how silver HAS held up somewhat to inflation and holding some value.

    ----- kj
  • DNADaveDNADave Posts: 7,238 ✭✭✭✭✭

    Turns out it was $250 in walking liberty halves (500 coins) in decent shape. Saw a few 1917, 1918, 1923-S and other earlier dates…… and these.

  • RobMRobM Posts: 528 ✭✭✭

    So you overpaid and got everything for 20x FV? :)

  • roadrunnerroadrunner Posts: 28,303 ✭✭✭✭✭

    @Higashiyama said:
    “Sheriff” is a somewhat unfortunate metaphor for a guy who will likely be in front of a war crimes tribunal within a decade, assuming he is still alive.

    In any case, autocrats with delusions of grandeur always lose (often creating havoc along the way)

    We will almost certainly see an accelerated rethinking of global monetary arrangements. Russia, however, is in absolutely no position to dictate, or even participate in, the discussions.

    Xi Jinging’s recent comments in discussions with European leaders were quite interesting.

    Russia is in a good bargaining position monetarily and energy-wise. They will probably come out of this a lot better than Europe. The alternative with not bargaining with Russia is Europe being left out in the cold without energy. And that energy will only be delivered with payment in PM's, other commodities, or rubles.

    Barbarous Relic No More, LSCC -GoldSeek--shadow stats--SafeHaven--321gold
  • HigashiyamaHigashiyama Posts: 2,133 ✭✭✭✭✭

    @roadrunner said: "Russia is in a good bargaining position monetarily and energy-wise. They will probably come out of this a lot better than Europe. The alternative with not bargaining with Russia is Europe being left out in the cold without energy. And that energy will only be delivered with payment in PM's, other commodities, or rubles."

    RR -- Though I tend to disagree with your observations above, it is great to see you posting again.

    Regarding "Russia is in a good bargaining position monetarily and energy-wise"

    For a short-term (couple of years) time horizon, I partly agree with the energy part. The winter of 2022-2023 could be very difficult for many Europeans, and could cause tension between those with more or less energy dependence on Russia. Gas is a much bigger issue than oil, of course, due to delivery infrastructure. Over a longer time horizon, a Russian move in 2022-2023 to cut off energy sales to Europe will backfire. There will be a lot of willing suppliers, infrastructure will be improved, alternative energy development will accelerate, and energy efficiency will improve.

    Regarding "They will probably come out of this a lot better than Europe."

    The most important drivers of an economy are (1) intellectual capital, (2) social capital, and (3) transparency/rule of law. Russia has a fair amount of (1), but it is impeded by lack of (2) and (3). Related to this, Russia's intellectual capital seems to periodically diminish by a brain drain. Russia's "undesirables" leave, creating great value in the US, Western Europe, and Israel. Russia is unlikely to come out of this better. Unless Russian leadership can shake their 19th century mindset, Russia will remain mired in the 19th century.

    Higashiyama
  • cohodkcohodk Posts: 18,512 ✭✭✭✭✭
    edited April 10, 2022 3:58AM

    @Higashiyama said:
    @roadrunner said: "Russia is in a good bargaining position monetarily and energy-wise. They will probably come out of this a lot better than Europe. The alternative with not bargaining with Russia is Europe being left out in the cold without energy. And that energy will only be delivered with payment in PM's, other commodities, or rubles."

    RR -- Though I tend to disagree with your observations above, it is great to see you posting again.

    Regarding "Russia is in a good bargaining position monetarily and energy-wise"

    For a short-term (couple of years) time horizon, I partly agree with the energy part. The winter of 2022-2023 could be very difficult for many Europeans, and could cause tension between those with more or less energy dependence on Russia. Gas is a much bigger issue than oil, of course, due to delivery infrastructure. Over a longer time horizon, a Russian move in 2022-2023 to cut off energy sales to Europe will backfire. There will be a lot of willing suppliers, infrastructure will be improved, alternative energy development will accelerate, and energy efficiency will improve.

    Regarding "They will probably come out of this a lot better than Europe."

    The most important drivers of an economy are (1) intellectual capital, (2) social capital, and (3) transparency/rule of law. Russia has a fair amount of (1), but it is impeded by lack of (2) and (3). Related to this, Russia's intellectual capital seems to periodically diminish by a brain drain. Russia's "undesirables" leave, creating great value in the US, Western Europe, and Israel. Russia is unlikely to come out of this better. Unless Russian leadership can shake their 19th century mindset, Russia will remain mired in the 19th century.

    No they're not. You just watch and see!!! This will be another conspiracy proven correct. You gotta stop drinking the coolaid and get the real facts. Petrodollar =schmetrodollar. The guy is a genius!! You'll see. Better be prepared.

    Ha ha ha ha ha.

    However, if it wasnt so serious, the diametrically opposed thinking of todays society would would be comical.

    Excuses are tools of the ignorant

    Knowledge is the enemy of fear

  • derrybderryb Posts: 36,033 ✭✭✭✭✭
    edited April 10, 2022 1:40PM

    @Higashiyama said:

    The most important drivers of an economy are (1) intellectual capital, (2) social capital, and (3) transparency/rule of law. Russia has a fair amount of (1), but it is impeded by lack of (2) and (3). Related to this, Russia's intellectual capital seems to periodically diminish by a brain drain. Russia's "undesirables" leave, creating great value in the US, Western Europe, and Israel. Russia is unlikely to come out of this better. Unless Russian leadership can shake their 19th century mindset, Russia will remain mired in the 19th century.

    The most important drivers of an economy are supply, demand and the physical capital (or available credit) to satisfy the terms of an agreed upon price. It has been repeatedly proven in our own economy that even a den of thieves with no intellectual/social capital or transparency/rule of law (lets start with bankers) can drive and steer an economy by either controlling the product supply or throttling the demand for it with increased capital/credit created from thin air.

    The winter of 2022-2023 could be very difficult for many Europeans, and could cause tension between those with more or less energy dependence on Russia. Gas is a much bigger issue than oil, of course, due to delivery infrastructure. Over a longer time horizon, a Russian move in 2022-2023 to cut off energy sales to Europe will backfire. There will be a lot of willing suppliers, infrastructure will be improved, alternative energy development will accelerate, and energy efficiency will improve.

    The winter of 2022-2023 will be difficult for many Europeans simply because their leaders chose to "follow suit" with sanctions. It is their own doing, blowback is a bitch. Those who own gold should have a "toasty" winter. One of the benefits of gold is that it protects us from our protectors.

    The decline from democracy to tyranny is both a natural and inevitable one.

  • jmski52jmski52 Posts: 22,271 ✭✭✭✭✭

    It wasn't Putin who shut down the pipelines in the US, Canada and Europe while allowing the Russian pipeline to go forward. The danger didn't come from abroad, it came directly from the big guy.

    Q: Are You Printing Money? Bernanke: Not Literally

    I knew it would happen.
  • bronco2078bronco2078 Posts: 9,961 ✭✭✭✭✭

    As a taxpayer i dont see how other countries being able to sell thier oil harms me.
    I dont work for a us based oil producer so i would prefer to pay less at the pump .
    Sanctions are fascism ,crony capitalism picking winners in home country industry enriching politicians all cloaked in false morality.

  • cohodkcohodk Posts: 18,512 ✭✭✭✭✭
    edited April 11, 2022 4:23AM

    Is there a difference between sanctions and tariffs? Or....whats the same?

    Excuses are tools of the ignorant

    Knowledge is the enemy of fear

  • derrybderryb Posts: 36,033 ✭✭✭✭✭

    big difference. One prevents trade the other taxes trade.

    The decline from democracy to tyranny is both a natural and inevitable one.

  • bronco2078bronco2078 Posts: 9,961 ✭✭✭✭✭
    edited April 11, 2022 4:52AM

    @cohodk said:
    Is there a difference between sanctions and tariffs? Or....whats the same?

    its the difference between an on off switch and a dimmer.

    Niether one hurts the politicians that apply them only the little people

  • cohodkcohodk Posts: 18,512 ✭✭✭✭✭

    @derryb said:
    big difference. One prevents trade the other taxes trade.

    Both are disruptive to free trade. Both are disruptive to the supply/demand equation.
    Both are inflationary.
    Borh are punitive.
    Both are protectionist.

    Yes Bronco....the little guy suffers, even when told he isnt.

    Excuses are tools of the ignorant

    Knowledge is the enemy of fear

  • bronco2078bronco2078 Posts: 9,961 ✭✭✭✭✭

    Peace is a great danger to non little people .
    There is no profit in peace .

  • derrybderryb Posts: 36,033 ✭✭✭✭✭

    @cohodk said:
    Is there a difference between sanctions and tariffs? Or....whats the same?

    They both have one "t" and one "s" and one "i."

    The decline from democracy to tyranny is both a natural and inevitable one.

  • blitzdudeblitzdude Posts: 5,303 ✭✭✭✭✭

    @bronco2078 said:
    Peace is a great danger to non little people .
    There is no profit in peace .

    Megadeth tried to warn you of this back in '86. And many more before and after them. The nerve of those damn Radical Satanists. Happy Easter, may it be filled with many chocolate bunnies and honey glazed hams. 'Merica™ RGDS!

    https://youtu.be/rdEupVsL07E

    The whole worlds off its rocker, buy Gold™.

  • cohodkcohodk Posts: 18,512 ✭✭✭✭✭
    edited April 12, 2022 3:32AM

    Great tune.....it pairs well with Holy Wars.

    "A country thats divided, surely will not stand."

    Excuses are tools of the ignorant

    Knowledge is the enemy of fear

  • jmski52jmski52 Posts: 22,271 ✭✭✭✭✭

    Looks like an up day for the metals, especially since they usually get slammed during the US market hours and today the beatdown isn't happening.

    Q: Are You Printing Money? Bernanke: Not Literally

    I knew it would happen.
  • tincuptincup Posts: 4,724 ✭✭✭✭✭

    Finding buys at $20 spot might have to wait for some time.... looks like general trend is going to keep going up for awhile.

    ----- kj
  • blitzdudeblitzdude Posts: 5,303 ✭✭✭✭✭

    @jmski52 said:
    Looks like an up day for the metals, especially since they usually get slammed during the US market hours and today the beatdown isn't happening.

    Hell Yeah! Semper!!

    The whole worlds off its rocker, buy Gold™.

  • TwoSides2aCoinTwoSides2aCoin Posts: 43,760 ✭✭✭✭✭

    @cohodk said:

    @derryb said:
    big difference. One prevents trade the other taxes trade.

    Both are disruptive to free trade. Both are disruptive to the supply/demand equation.
    Both are inflationary.
    Borh are punitive.
    Both are protectionist.

    Yes Bronco....the little guy suffers, even when told he isnt.

    We were born to die. Suffering is just a small part of the equation.

  • blitzdudeblitzdude Posts: 5,303 ✭✭✭✭✭

    @TwoSides2aCoin said:

    @cohodk said:

    @derryb said:
    big difference. One prevents trade the other taxes trade.

    Both are disruptive to free trade. Both are disruptive to the supply/demand equation.
    Both are inflationary.
    Borh are punitive.
    Both are protectionist.

    Yes Bronco....the little guy suffers, even when told he isnt.

    We were born to die. Suffering is just a small part of the equation.

    Some suffer more than others, surprisingly for many the "suffering" is self inflicted. THKS!

    The whole worlds off its rocker, buy Gold™.

  • TwoSides2aCoinTwoSides2aCoin Posts: 43,760 ✭✭✭✭✭

    Good point blitz.

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