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Why don't Specimen notes have back's with plate No. 1 ?

Hey, they are Specimens, the first, a trial for proving.
I would think both fp/bp are #1

Are they re-using prior backs?
Or are there so many Specimens that more than one back is used for each District?
Or is is deendent on the number of engraver's working on Specimen notes?

Comments

  • Steve_in_TampaSteve_in_Tampa Posts: 1,819 ✭✭✭✭✭

    United States Specimen notes (FRNs) are typically regular issue blocks with special serial numbers and a pair of red SPECIMEN imprints on the face.

  • TookybanditTookybandit Posts: 3,410 ✭✭✭✭

    Backs typically continue from the previous series so a Bp.1 would be uncommon even for a specimen on the majority of issues.

  • synchrsynchr Posts: 1,373 ✭✭✭✭
    edited April 5, 2021 4:41PM

    Thank you
    bp 15 is pretty low

  • Serial_no_8Serial_no_8 Posts: 422 ✭✭✭

    "Hey, they are Specimens, the first, a trial for proving.
    I would think both fp/bp are #1"

    • I think you might be confusing "Specimen" with "Colour Trial" or "Proofs" which are a "whole different kettle of fish." The first are, just regular sheet notes, but with some alteration to mark them as specimen examples. Some nations use regular numbers but North American & most countries used all-naughts (00000000) & red specimen letters. In the past they were punch holed. They are usually intended to train bank employees or foreign exchange employees & weren't meant to be issued.

    I'm not sure exactly how "colour trials" are produced but they are in the early stages like a proof. and may be the type of note which would not have a position number.

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