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Dang! Surely this didn't happen! Another USPS possible nightmare!

amwldcoinamwldcoin Posts: 11,269 ✭✭✭✭✭

Haven't hear from the buyer yet. Anyone ever seen this happen with the USPS?

Disposed by Post Office
Your item could not be delivered to the intended recipient or returned to sender. It has been disposed of by USPS.
March 1, 2021
In Transit to Next Facility
February 25, 2021, 6:32 pm
Arrived at USPS Regional Origin Facility
ATLANTA GA DISTRIBUTION CENTER
February 25, 2021, 5:17 pm
Accepted at USPS Origin Facility
VILLA RICA, GA 30180
February 25, 2021, 2:12 pm
USPS in possession of item
VILLA RICA, GA 30180
February 25, 2021, 11:02 am
Shipping Label Created, USPS Awaiting Item
VILLA RICA, GA 30180

Comments

  • Options
    d9lowed9lowe Posts: 304 ✭✭✭✭

    What was in it?? Lol. I have had packages shipped back to the sender due to damage during transit, but never disposal

  • Options
    MsMorrisineMsMorrisine Posts: 32,199 ✭✭✭✭✭

    never seen that one before

    ack. did you do a missing mail form online? perhaps they can locate it before it goes into the void and gets auctioned off.

    Current maintainer of Stone's Master List of Favorite Websites // My BST transactions
  • Options
    amwldcoinamwldcoin Posts: 11,269 ✭✭✭✭✭

    Doing that after this reply!

    @MsMorrisine said:
    never seen that one before

    ack. did you do a missing mail form online? perhaps they can locate it before it goes into the void and gets auctioned off.

  • Options
    dcarrdcarr Posts: 7,997 ✭✭✭✭✭

    If the address label got torn off by the machinery, and there was no destination address or return address anywhere in the contents, would the USPS "dispose of" the package ? And if so, the tracking above seems like a pretty quick "disposal".

  • Options
    derrybderryb Posts: 36,190 ✭✭✭✭✭

    unfortunately tracking number does not provide usps the originating address. Always include something inside the package that does this. I usually include a copy of the shipping label I printed. Hopefully you included paperwork and hopefully it will get opened at disposal and hopefully a conscience clerk will see that you get it returned. . . hopefully.

    Keep an open mind, or get financially repressed -Zoltan Pozsar

  • Options
    derrybderryb Posts: 36,190 ✭✭✭✭✭

    . . . be hopeful!

    Keep an open mind, or get financially repressed -Zoltan Pozsar

  • Options
    ms70ms70 Posts: 13,946 ✭✭✭✭✭

    Thank goodness we pay for insurance to protect our items from the people we expect to deliver them.

    Great transactions with oih82w8, JasonGaming, Moose1913.

  • Options
    mynamespatmynamespat Posts: 75 ✭✭✭

    Not too long ago, either on this forum or the cointalk one, somebody ran into a problem where the mail carrier was shot and robbed. Because the packages were contaminated with biological material, they had to be quarantined. ...not sure if they ever got that package...

  • Options
    CaptHenwayCaptHenway Posts: 31,545 ✭✭✭✭✭

    Saw something this morning that said at some post office in North Carolina last year, over 40,000 packages got scanned as "delivered" even though they had not yet left the post office for delivery. The two carriers involved said that the former postmaster had told them to scan everything as delivered when they got it to make their delivery times look good. I assume that most of the packages did get delivered eventually, but the scan meant nothing.

    Numismatist. 50 year member ANA. Winner of four ANA Heath Literary Awards; three Wayte and Olga Raymond Literary Awards; Numismatist of the Year Award 2009, and Lifetime Achievement Award 2020. Winner numerous NLG Literary Awards.
  • Options
    amwldcoinamwldcoin Posts: 11,269 ✭✭✭✭✭
    edited March 8, 2021 3:54PM

    Of course the buyer just filed a request for a refund. I highly doubt my label was torn from the package as it would have to be destroyed to do that. We will see if he is patient as I informed him I just filed a missing mail search and feel it was scanned in error. Wish I had insurance just so I could rub it in on the USPS but it's not worth insuring a $50.00 coin. This might make me rethink shipping to Puerto Rico.

  • Options
    jmlanzafjmlanzaf Posts: 31,867 ✭✭✭✭✭
    edited March 8, 2021 4:34PM

    @dcarr said:
    If the address label got torn off by the machinery, and there was no destination address or return address anywhere in the contents, would the USPS "dispose of" the package ? And if so, the tracking above seems like a pretty quick "disposal".

    If they know the package is being disposed, it must still have a tracking number on it even if there's no address

  • Options
    MsMorrisineMsMorrisine Posts: 32,199 ✭✭✭✭✭

    doesn't the PO give out $100 insurance for free?

    Current maintainer of Stone's Master List of Favorite Websites // My BST transactions
  • Options
    DavideoDavideo Posts: 1,361 ✭✭✭✭

    @MsMorrisine said:
    doesn't the PO give out $100 insurance for free?

    For Priority yes, but not first class.

  • Options
    jmlanzafjmlanzaf Posts: 31,867 ✭✭✭✭✭

    @Davideo said:

    @MsMorrisine said:
    doesn't the PO give out $100 insurance for free?

    For Priority yes, but not first class.

    Actually it's $50 on priority, $100 with the commercial plus pricing of eBay. [Not that it matters to this thread, but just FYI]

  • Options
    jmlanzafjmlanzaf Posts: 31,867 ✭✭✭✭✭

    @derryb said:
    unfortunately tracking number does not provide usps the originating address. Always include something inside the package that does this. I usually include a copy of the shipping label I printed. Hopefully you included paperwork and hopefully it will get opened at disposal and hopefully a conscience clerk will see that you get it returned. . . hopefully.

    Yes, but it can still be tracked by the owner using the tracking number. And if the label was created electronically through eBay or PayPal or stamps.com etc., the sender and recipient addresses can be proven/verified by the sender because they are stored on the system.

  • Options
    scooter25scooter25 Posts: 769 ✭✭✭✭

    I just had a guy I sold a coin to request a refund because the envelope I sent the coin in arrived torn in half with the coin missing. USPS stuck the torn envelope in another envelope that said “damaged in transit” on it .

  • Options
    amwldcoinamwldcoin Posts: 11,269 ✭✭✭✭✭

    All I can say is if this really is the case all points to a USPS employee with sticky fingers. The package was delayed and delayed, and now this! I don't suspect the buyer at all seeing as he has 3500 feedbacks.

  • Options
    jmlanzafjmlanzaf Posts: 31,867 ✭✭✭✭✭

    @amwldcoin said:
    All I can say is if this really is the case all points to a USPS employee with sticky fingers. The package was delayed and delayed, and now this! I don't suspect the buyer at all seeing as he has 3500 feedbacks.

    How is a missing address evidence of sticky fingers???

  • Options
    zas107zas107 Posts: 824 ✭✭✭

    The package might have been heavily soiled. If it's not insured and severely damaged in transit they will dispose of the parcel all together. Not fun.

  • Options
    edgaredgar Posts: 886 ✭✭✭✭
    edited March 8, 2021 5:30PM

    I replay a scenario (when waiting for valuable items) of a mail truck, fire/crash. plane crash, or a building/machine fire, and receiving a simular tracking notice. not good remember those news clips of FEDEX and UPS trucks shredded on the highway, packages destroyed and strewn about....not good. I remember many saying, "I hope that's not my UHRDE

    (l8-)>>

  • Options
    RedstoneCoinsRedstoneCoins Posts: 217 ✭✭✭
    edited March 8, 2021 5:44PM

    @jmlanzaf said:

    @amwldcoin said:
    All I can say is if this really is the case all points to a USPS employee with sticky fingers. The package was delayed and delayed, and now this! I don't suspect the buyer at all seeing as he has 3500 feedbacks.

    How is a missing address evidence of sticky fingers???

    According to the US Postal Inspectors (criminal investigators), over 600,000 packages are stolen every year by USPS employees and over 300 mailmen are arrested and criminally charged every year for stealing packages.

    Aside from the most common tactic that crooked USPS employees use (which is to simply label a stolen package as "Delivered" with a false scan), in the era of rising home-based camera surveillance systems (such as Ring video doorbell), which would easily prove to a Postal Inspector that the mailman under investigation never rang the doorbell or left the package at the door, a cautious mailman cognizant of this fact will simply create a false claim of undeliverability (i.e., missing or faulty address, or unreadable postage) so as circumvent the required use of the GPS-enabled scanning devices that indicate delivered status.

    Expect the prevalence of this particular form of theft to rise with time. Even if it does not apply in this particular case (as the most pernicious aspect of this crime is its' plausibility to be thought of as true), crooks of all kinds can always find new ways to get clever.

  • Options
    jmlanzafjmlanzaf Posts: 31,867 ✭✭✭✭✭

    @RedstoneCoins said:

    @jmlanzaf said:

    @amwldcoin said:
    All I can say is if this really is the case all points to a USPS employee with sticky fingers. The package was delayed and delayed, and now this! I don't suspect the buyer at all seeing as he has 3500 feedbacks.

    How is a missing address evidence of sticky fingers???

    According to the US Postal Inspectors (criminal investigators), over 600,000 packages are stolen every year by USPS employees and over mailmen 300 are arrested and criminally charged every year for stealing packages.

    Aside from the most common tactic that crooked USPS employees use (which is to simply label a stolen package as "Delivered" with a false scan), in the era of rising home-based camera surveillance systems (such as Ring video doorbell), which would easily prove to a Postal Inspector that the mailman under investigation never rang the doorbell or left the package at the door, a cautious mailman cognizant of this fact will simply create a false claim of undeliverability (i.e., missing or faulty address, or unreadable postage) so as circumvent the required use of the GPS-enabled scanning devices that indicate delivered status.

    Expect the prevalence of this particular form of theft to rise with time. Even if it does not apply in this particular case (as the most pernicious aspect of this crime is its' plausibility to be thought of as true), crooks of all kinds can always find new ways to get clever.

    Maybe. Or maybe it just got rained on.

    So, is USPS the safest shipper? According to CNBC, 1.7 million packages PER DAY are stolen!!!!

    https://www.cnbc.com/2020/01/10/package-theft-how-amazon-google-others-are-fighting-porch-pirates.html

  • Options
    amwldcoinamwldcoin Posts: 11,269 ✭✭✭✭✭

    LOL! You didn't read my previous comment that I highly doubt my self sticking labels with the corners secured by the best scotch shipping tape you can buy. As said above if they have the tracking number they can find the shipper if they want to.

    When you file a missing mail request and enter the tracking number much of the info is autofilled!

    @jmlanzaf said:

    @amwldcoin said:
    All I can say is if this really is the case all points to a USPS employee with sticky fingers. The package was delayed and delayed, and now this! I don't suspect the buyer at all seeing as he has 3500 feedbacks.

    How is a missing address evidence of sticky fingers???

  • Options
    RedstoneCoinsRedstoneCoins Posts: 217 ✭✭✭

    @jmlanzaf said:

    @RedstoneCoins said:

    @jmlanzaf said:

    @amwldcoin said:
    All I can say is if this really is the case all points to a USPS employee with sticky fingers. The package was delayed and delayed, and now this! I don't suspect the buyer at all seeing as he has 3500 feedbacks.

    How is a missing address evidence of sticky fingers???

    According to the US Postal Inspectors (criminal investigators), over 600,000 packages are stolen every year by USPS employees and over mailmen 300 are arrested and criminally charged every year for stealing packages.

    Aside from the most common tactic that crooked USPS employees use (which is to simply label a stolen package as "Delivered" with a false scan), in the era of rising home-based camera surveillance systems (such as Ring video doorbell), which would easily prove to a Postal Inspector that the mailman under investigation never rang the doorbell or left the package at the door, a cautious mailman cognizant of this fact will simply create a false claim of undeliverability (i.e., missing or faulty address, or unreadable postage) so as circumvent the required use of the GPS-enabled scanning devices that indicate delivered status.

    Expect the prevalence of this particular form of theft to rise with time. Even if it does not apply in this particular case (as the most pernicious aspect of this crime is its' plausibility to be thought of as true), crooks of all kinds can always find new ways to get clever.

    Maybe. Or maybe it just got rained on.

    So, is USPS the safest shipper? According to CNBC, 1.7 million packages PER DAY are stolen!!!!

    https://www.cnbc.com/2020/01/10/package-theft-how-amazon-google-others-are-fighting-porch-pirates.html

    You should consider carefully the precise meaning of my words.

    Yes, 1.7 million packages are stolen every day. But those are largely by common criminals and neighborhood petty thieves.

    The 600,000 packages stolen annually by USPS employees represent a much more devious and traitorous mentality, as these were crimes committed by people who swore an oath to protect our property and our packages, to whom we impart our trust for our family keepsakes and valuables when transmitting them across the continent or globe.

    It's an egregious violation of trust incomparable to the transgressions of the common lowly looting scoundrel.

    It makes you question the integrity of the entire shipping system when you realize anyone within it could be compromised.

    Especially if you have lots of high-insurance-value packages being delivered to your house, or receive many packages with return addresses to bullion companies, that is inevitably going to arouse attention from criminal elements.

    Can we really trust the people who deliver our packages given the known facts of just how many of our packages are stolen by the mailman himself?

  • Options
    jmlanzafjmlanzaf Posts: 31,867 ✭✭✭✭✭

    @amwldcoin said:
    LOL! You didn't read my previous comment that I highly doubt my self sticking labels with the corners secured by the best scotch shipping tape you can buy. As said above if they have the tracking number they can find the shipper if they want to.

    When you file a missing mail request and enter the tracking number much of the info is autofilled!

    @jmlanzaf said:

    @amwldcoin said:
    All I can say is if this really is the case all points to a USPS employee with sticky fingers. The package was delayed and delayed, and now this! I don't suspect the buyer at all seeing as he has 3500 feedbacks.

    How is a missing address evidence of sticky fingers???

    If only the corners are secured, water alone will cause the ink to run

  • Options
    jmlanzafjmlanzaf Posts: 31,867 ✭✭✭✭✭

    @RedstoneCoins said:

    @jmlanzaf said:

    @RedstoneCoins said:

    @jmlanzaf said:

    @amwldcoin said:
    All I can say is if this really is the case all points to a USPS employee with sticky fingers. The package was delayed and delayed, and now this! I don't suspect the buyer at all seeing as he has 3500 feedbacks.

    How is a missing address evidence of sticky fingers???

    According to the US Postal Inspectors (criminal investigators), over 600,000 packages are stolen every year by USPS employees and over mailmen 300 are arrested and criminally charged every year for stealing packages.

    Aside from the most common tactic that crooked USPS employees use (which is to simply label a stolen package as "Delivered" with a false scan), in the era of rising home-based camera surveillance systems (such as Ring video doorbell), which would easily prove to a Postal Inspector that the mailman under investigation never rang the doorbell or left the package at the door, a cautious mailman cognizant of this fact will simply create a false claim of undeliverability (i.e., missing or faulty address, or unreadable postage) so as circumvent the required use of the GPS-enabled scanning devices that indicate delivered status.

    Expect the prevalence of this particular form of theft to rise with time. Even if it does not apply in this particular case (as the most pernicious aspect of this crime is its' plausibility to be thought of as true), crooks of all kinds can always find new ways to get clever.

    Maybe. Or maybe it just got rained on.

    So, is USPS the safest shipper? According to CNBC, 1.7 million packages PER DAY are stolen!!!!

    https://www.cnbc.com/2020/01/10/package-theft-how-amazon-google-others-are-fighting-porch-pirates.html

    You should consider carefully the precise meaning of my words.

    Yes, 1.7 million packages are stolen every day. But those are largely by common criminals and neighborhood petty thieves.

    The 600,000 packages stolen annually by USPS employees represent a much more devious and traitorous mentality, as these were crimes committed by people who swore an oath to protect our property and our packages, to whom we impart our trust for our family keepsakes and valuables when transmitting them across the continent or globe.

    It's an egregious violation of trust incomparable to the transgressions of the common lowly looting scoundrel.

    It makes you question the integrity of the entire shipping system when you realize anyone within it could be compromised.

    Especially if you have lots of high-insurance-value packages being delivered to your house, or receive many packages with return addresses to bullion companies, that is inevitably going to arouse attention from criminal elements.

    Can we really trust the people who deliver our packages given the known facts of just how many of our packages are stolen by the mailman himself?

    That's still an insignificant number relative to the total number stolen. That makes your neighbor a higher risk than the mailman

  • Options
    amwldcoinamwldcoin Posts: 11,269 ✭✭✭✭✭

    Well! The tracking number is there. :p

    @jmlanzaf said:

    @amwldcoin said:
    LOL! You didn't read my previous comment that I highly doubt my self sticking labels with the corners secured by the best scotch shipping tape you can buy. As said above if they have the tracking number they can find the shipper if they want to.

    When you file a missing mail request and enter the tracking number much of the info is autofilled!

    @jmlanzaf said:

    @amwldcoin said:
    All I can say is if this really is the case all points to a USPS employee with sticky fingers. The package was delayed and delayed, and now this! I don't suspect the buyer at all seeing as he has 3500 feedbacks.

    How is a missing address evidence of sticky fingers???

    If only the corners are secured, water alone will cause the ink to run

  • Options
    jmlanzafjmlanzaf Posts: 31,867 ✭✭✭✭✭

    @amwldcoin said:
    Well! The tracking number is there. :p

    @jmlanzaf said:

    @amwldcoin said:
    LOL! You didn't read my previous comment that I highly doubt my self sticking labels with the corners secured by the best scotch shipping tape you can buy. As said above if they have the tracking number they can find the shipper if they want to.

    When you file a missing mail request and enter the tracking number much of the info is autofilled!

    @jmlanzaf said:

    @amwldcoin said:
    All I can say is if this really is the case all points to a USPS employee with sticky fingers. The package was delayed and delayed, and now this! I don't suspect the buyer at all seeing as he has 3500 feedbacks.

    How is a missing address evidence of sticky fingers???

    If only the corners are secured, water alone will cause the ink to run

    I agree that they should be able to track you down. But that's different than sticky fingers. I mean, it's possible, but so are 20 other things.

  • Options
    RedstoneCoinsRedstoneCoins Posts: 217 ✭✭✭

    @jmlanzaf said:

    @RedstoneCoins said:

    @jmlanzaf said:

    @RedstoneCoins said:

    @jmlanzaf said:

    @amwldcoin said:
    All I can say is if this really is the case all points to a USPS employee with sticky fingers. The package was delayed and delayed, and now this! I don't suspect the buyer at all seeing as he has 3500 feedbacks.

    How is a missing address evidence of sticky fingers???

    According to the US Postal Inspectors (criminal investigators), over 600,000 packages are stolen every year by USPS employees and over mailmen 300 are arrested and criminally charged every year for stealing packages.

    Aside from the most common tactic that crooked USPS employees use (which is to simply label a stolen package as "Delivered" with a false scan), in the era of rising home-based camera surveillance systems (such as Ring video doorbell), which would easily prove to a Postal Inspector that the mailman under investigation never rang the doorbell or left the package at the door, a cautious mailman cognizant of this fact will simply create a false claim of undeliverability (i.e., missing or faulty address, or unreadable postage) so as circumvent the required use of the GPS-enabled scanning devices that indicate delivered status.

    Expect the prevalence of this particular form of theft to rise with time. Even if it does not apply in this particular case (as the most pernicious aspect of this crime is its' plausibility to be thought of as true), crooks of all kinds can always find new ways to get clever.

    Maybe. Or maybe it just got rained on.

    So, is USPS the safest shipper? According to CNBC, 1.7 million packages PER DAY are stolen!!!!

    https://www.cnbc.com/2020/01/10/package-theft-how-amazon-google-others-are-fighting-porch-pirates.html

    You should consider carefully the precise meaning of my words.

    Yes, 1.7 million packages are stolen every day. But those are largely by common criminals and neighborhood petty thieves.

    The 600,000 packages stolen annually by USPS employees represent a much more devious and traitorous mentality, as these were crimes committed by people who swore an oath to protect our property and our packages, to whom we impart our trust for our family keepsakes and valuables when transmitting them across the continent or globe.

    It's an egregious violation of trust incomparable to the transgressions of the common lowly looting scoundrel.

    It makes you question the integrity of the entire shipping system when you realize anyone within it could be compromised.

    Especially if you have lots of high-insurance-value packages being delivered to your house, or receive many packages with return addresses to bullion companies, that is inevitably going to arouse attention from criminal elements.

    Can we really trust the people who deliver our packages given the known facts of just how many of our packages are stolen by the mailman himself?

    That's still an insignificant number relative to the total number stolen. That makes your neighbor a higher risk than the mailman

    There are ways to prevent package theft by your neighbor, such as by using a P.O. box, or a one-way locking mailbox/package dropoff box at your house (where packages can only be inserted but cannot be removed without a key).

    There are no ways to prevent package theft by your mailman.

    And none of that changes the significant violation of trust, which is the bigger concern of the two types of package theft involved here. It's fundamentally compromising to any system to say you cannot fully trust those who run it, given how many of them commit crimes (many more going uncaught).

    The latter is clearly more egregious and difficult to resolve, by nature.

  • Options
    jmlanzafjmlanzaf Posts: 31,867 ✭✭✭✭✭

    @RedstoneCoins said:

    @jmlanzaf said:

    @RedstoneCoins said:

    @jmlanzaf said:

    @RedstoneCoins said:

    @jmlanzaf said:

    @amwldcoin said:
    All I can say is if this really is the case all points to a USPS employee with sticky fingers. The package was delayed and delayed, and now this! I don't suspect the buyer at all seeing as he has 3500 feedbacks.

    How is a missing address evidence of sticky fingers???

    According to the US Postal Inspectors (criminal investigators), over 600,000 packages are stolen every year by USPS employees and over mailmen 300 are arrested and criminally charged every year for stealing packages.

    Aside from the most common tactic that crooked USPS employees use (which is to simply label a stolen package as "Delivered" with a false scan), in the era of rising home-based camera surveillance systems (such as Ring video doorbell), which would easily prove to a Postal Inspector that the mailman under investigation never rang the doorbell or left the package at the door, a cautious mailman cognizant of this fact will simply create a false claim of undeliverability (i.e., missing or faulty address, or unreadable postage) so as circumvent the required use of the GPS-enabled scanning devices that indicate delivered status.

    Expect the prevalence of this particular form of theft to rise with time. Even if it does not apply in this particular case (as the most pernicious aspect of this crime is its' plausibility to be thought of as true), crooks of all kinds can always find new ways to get clever.

    Maybe. Or maybe it just got rained on.

    So, is USPS the safest shipper? According to CNBC, 1.7 million packages PER DAY are stolen!!!!

    https://www.cnbc.com/2020/01/10/package-theft-how-amazon-google-others-are-fighting-porch-pirates.html

    You should consider carefully the precise meaning of my words.

    Yes, 1.7 million packages are stolen every day. But those are largely by common criminals and neighborhood petty thieves.

    The 600,000 packages stolen annually by USPS employees represent a much more devious and traitorous mentality, as these were crimes committed by people who swore an oath to protect our property and our packages, to whom we impart our trust for our family keepsakes and valuables when transmitting them across the continent or globe.

    It's an egregious violation of trust incomparable to the transgressions of the common lowly looting scoundrel.

    It makes you question the integrity of the entire shipping system when you realize anyone within it could be compromised.

    Especially if you have lots of high-insurance-value packages being delivered to your house, or receive many packages with return addresses to bullion companies, that is inevitably going to arouse attention from criminal elements.

    Can we really trust the people who deliver our packages given the known facts of just how many of our packages are stolen by the mailman himself?

    That's still an insignificant number relative to the total number stolen. That makes your neighbor a higher risk than the mailman

    There are ways to prevent package theft by your neighbor, such as by using a P.O. box, or a one-way locking mailbox/package dropoff box at your house (where packages can only be inserted but cannot be removed without a key).

    There are no ways to prevent package theft by your mailman.

    And none of that changes the significant violation of trust, which is the bigger concern of the two types of package theft involved here. It's fundamentally compromising to any system to say you cannot fully trust those who run it, given how many of them commit crimes (many more going uncaught).

    The latter is clearly more egregious and difficult to resolve, by nature.

    Yes, but all institutions are made up of people. There are always going to be a few bad apples in any group.

  • Options
    RedstoneCoinsRedstoneCoins Posts: 217 ✭✭✭

    @jmlanzaf said:

    @RedstoneCoins said:

    @jmlanzaf said:

    @RedstoneCoins said:

    @jmlanzaf said:

    @RedstoneCoins said:

    @jmlanzaf said:

    @amwldcoin said:
    All I can say is if this really is the case all points to a USPS employee with sticky fingers. The package was delayed and delayed, and now this! I don't suspect the buyer at all seeing as he has 3500 feedbacks.

    How is a missing address evidence of sticky fingers???

    According to the US Postal Inspectors (criminal investigators), over 600,000 packages are stolen every year by USPS employees and over mailmen 300 are arrested and criminally charged every year for stealing packages.

    Aside from the most common tactic that crooked USPS employees use (which is to simply label a stolen package as "Delivered" with a false scan), in the era of rising home-based camera surveillance systems (such as Ring video doorbell), which would easily prove to a Postal Inspector that the mailman under investigation never rang the doorbell or left the package at the door, a cautious mailman cognizant of this fact will simply create a false claim of undeliverability (i.e., missing or faulty address, or unreadable postage) so as circumvent the required use of the GPS-enabled scanning devices that indicate delivered status.

    Expect the prevalence of this particular form of theft to rise with time. Even if it does not apply in this particular case (as the most pernicious aspect of this crime is its' plausibility to be thought of as true), crooks of all kinds can always find new ways to get clever.

    Maybe. Or maybe it just got rained on.

    So, is USPS the safest shipper? According to CNBC, 1.7 million packages PER DAY are stolen!!!!

    https://www.cnbc.com/2020/01/10/package-theft-how-amazon-google-others-are-fighting-porch-pirates.html

    You should consider carefully the precise meaning of my words.

    Yes, 1.7 million packages are stolen every day. But those are largely by common criminals and neighborhood petty thieves.

    The 600,000 packages stolen annually by USPS employees represent a much more devious and traitorous mentality, as these were crimes committed by people who swore an oath to protect our property and our packages, to whom we impart our trust for our family keepsakes and valuables when transmitting them across the continent or globe.

    It's an egregious violation of trust incomparable to the transgressions of the common lowly looting scoundrel.

    It makes you question the integrity of the entire shipping system when you realize anyone within it could be compromised.

    Especially if you have lots of high-insurance-value packages being delivered to your house, or receive many packages with return addresses to bullion companies, that is inevitably going to arouse attention from criminal elements.

    Can we really trust the people who deliver our packages given the known facts of just how many of our packages are stolen by the mailman himself?

    That's still an insignificant number relative to the total number stolen. That makes your neighbor a higher risk than the mailman

    There are ways to prevent package theft by your neighbor, such as by using a P.O. box, or a one-way locking mailbox/package dropoff box at your house (where packages can only be inserted but cannot be removed without a key).

    There are no ways to prevent package theft by your mailman.

    And none of that changes the significant violation of trust, which is the bigger concern of the two types of package theft involved here. It's fundamentally compromising to any system to say you cannot fully trust those who run it, given how many of them commit crimes (many more going uncaught).

    The latter is clearly more egregious and difficult to resolve, by nature.

    Yes, but all institutions are made up of people. There are always going to be a few bad apples in any group.

    Not all institutions are responsible for taking care of my property. My neighbors didn't take an oath to protect my property. United States Postal employees did.

    People should respect the oaths they take. Unfortunately our society has devolved to the point where people no longer respect the oaths they took or the institutions they serve under, which has resulted in chaos in more ways than one.

    Deflecting or deferring to the inherent imperfectability of man is a cop-out. Are people imperfect? Yes, of course. Does that justify imperfect actions? Absolutely not.

    I think any Postal Employee who steals packages should get double the prison time of any normal package thief, since they knew what they were doing was a significant violation of the public trust and law. The same should apply to any police officer, lawyer, or judge who violates the law as well: double the normal punishment, since they violated the public trust and knew in advance the law but violated it anyway.

    But I digress.

    I guess it really irks me personally when it's an inside job. Anyhow, good night.

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