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US Philippines (USPI) VICTORY Banknotes

ZoinsZoins Posts: 25,239 ✭✭✭✭✭
edited November 27, 2020 1:23PM in U.S. & World Currency Forum

Does anyone collect US Philippines banknotes?

I'm very interested in the ones that are stamped VICTORY on that back.

Do we know who did those?

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Comments

  • Scooter007Scooter007 Posts: 93 ✭✭✭
    edited November 27, 2020 8:02PM

    In October 1944 the US liberated the Philippines 🇵🇭 from the Japanese.
    The series 66 Victory notes were printed by the United States Bureau of engraving & printing
    and were supposedly designated “Victory series no. 66 “ because that was the Philippine’s President Quezon’s age when he died before the liberation.
    When MacArthur returned on Oct 20, 1944 he brought along many boxes of these Victory notes to be put into circulation.
    Denominations of 1,2,5,10 20,50,100,& 500 pesos notes were printed as well as replacement star notes.
    All the denominations had the Victory overprinted on the reverse.

  • Scooter007Scooter007 Posts: 93 ✭✭✭
    edited November 29, 2020 2:13PM

    My father brought the above Victory Peso home from his time in the Navy during WWII.
    It has more sentimental value than monetary … for sure.

  • Scooter007Scooter007 Posts: 93 ✭✭✭
    edited November 29, 2020 6:48AM

  • Jinx86Jinx86 Posts: 3,638 ✭✭✭✭✭

    I've only cherry picked a few notes over the years. All aviator packet notes that I tie into my WWII collection theme.

  • CaptHenwayCaptHenway Posts: 28,689 ✭✭✭✭✭

    My Dad spent several months in the Philippines after the Liberation and before he went on to Japan for Occupation duty. He brought back several of the Japanese Philippine occupation notes that some other GI gave him for nothing and a few of the silver and bronze 1944-45 Liberation coins that were in circulation while he was there, but no VICTORY notes.

    What was the exchange rate on them? Dollar for dollar, or what?

    Winner of the ANA's 2020 Heath Literary Award, Wayte and Olga Raymond Literary Award, and Lifetime Achievement Award. Winner NLG 2020 Best Numismatic Feature Article, U.S.
  • 291fifth291fifth Posts: 19,998 ✭✭✭✭✭

    @CaptHenway said:
    My Dad spent several months in the Philippines after the Liberation and before he went on to Japan for Occupation duty. He brought back several of the Japanese Philippine occupation notes that some other GI gave him for nothing and a few of the silver and bronze 1944-45 Liberation coins that were in circulation while he was there, but no VICTORY notes.

    What was the exchange rate on them? Dollar for dollar, or what?

    The US/Philippine peso was worth 50 cents US. US forces in the Philippines were paid in US/Philippine money which would be exchanged for regular US currency when they returned to the US.

    All glory is fleeting.
  • 291fifth291fifth Posts: 19,998 ✭✭✭✭✭

    The liberation of the Philippines BEGAN in October, 1944 but fighting continued until and even after the war ended in September, 1945. The last Japanese soldier in the Philippines did not surrender until the early 1970's.

    All glory is fleeting.
  • johnny9434johnny9434 Posts: 22,792 ✭✭✭✭✭
    edited November 30, 2020 10:22AM

    i remember that 291fifth that is an interesting story

  • SaorAlbaSaorAlba Posts: 6,925 ✭✭✭✭✭

    Some of the early Philippine notes had a clause on them promising payment in US $.

    In memory of my kitty Seryozha 14.2.1996 ~ 13.9.2016
  • coinkatcoinkat Posts: 20,187 ✭✭✭✭✭

    I am not a serious collector of these, but there are VICTORY reverses that also include Central Bank of the Philippines in red and there are at least two different styles associated with the red block lettering. There are so-called aviator notes with a red seal that I believe are war related as were a special sequence of serial numbers that were experimental. Besides those notes, there are several other interesting notes that are well designed and have a collector base.

    Experience the World through Numismatics...it's more than you can imagine.

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