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How do I make these legit

Nwarren31001Nwarren31001 Posts: 6
edited August 3, 2020 3:23PM in Autographs Forum

These were handed down to me through an uncle he was a big-time brave fan but there's no certification with them that I'm aware of but I know that these signatures are authentic how do I find out first of all whose signatures they are because they're hard to read and if for sure they are legit and how do I go about getting them legitimised![](https://us.v-cdn.net/6027503/uploads/editor/w0
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Comments

  • burghmanburghman Posts: 421 ✭✭✭

    PSA can authenticate for you, but the prices go up for bigger and more names, so it may not be worth it if you’re looking to authenticate for resale purposes: https://www.psacard.com/services/autographedbaseballgrading

    They also have reference autographs for many of the more popular names to compare against, many on signed balls. Less popular names might take more time scouring rosters once you get some of the other names. If you can post good pictures, folks here are usually pretty good with the more common names.

    Jim

  • Thank you for the advice and I will try to post some more pictures that give a little more insight of the signature and thanks again

  • mrmoparmrmopar Posts: 631 ✭✭✭

    Don't bother, that is a preprinted souvenir ball. The autographs are not hand signed by the players.

    I collect Steve Garvey, Dodgers and signed cards. Collector since 1978.
  • JBKJBK Posts: 8,224 ✭✭✭✭✭

    @mrmopar said:
    Don't bother, that is a preprinted souvenir ball. The autographs are not hand signed by the players.

    I was wondering about that.

    They looked a little too clean and perfectly placed.

  • mrmoparmrmopar Posts: 631 ✭✭✭

    The telltale is usually a combo of these:

    The ball is a cheap plastic ball made in Taiwan, China or Haiti, etc. Real signatures on balls like that will bleed over time.

    The signatures are all uniformly sized, like everyone would actually apply the same pressure when a team ball is signed.

    There are parts of signatures on seams. This may be more of an older issue, as these balls have been made since the 50s and before. Maybe they have gotten better with placement, but a mid 70s Dodger souvenir ball, you can count on sigs over the laces.

    The signatures are in weird spots and are oriented wrong. Sometimes they would be upside down compared to the rest. not that this could not happen in real life, but most players are probably conscious about where they are signing.

    The facsimile balls are pretty easy to spot if you have been collecting for a while. I also collect Dodger balls like that (along with real signatures), so have a dozen or more in my collection too. Chipper Jones is front and center with what looks like Vinny Castilla beneath his.

    It's interesting on ebay when I tell people selling them as real. It's been a fun split of some people appreciate the info and a few that argue with me until their faces must be blue that they are hand signed!

    I collect Steve Garvey, Dodgers and signed cards. Collector since 1978.
  • JBKJBK Posts: 8,224 ✭✭✭✭✭

    That's a great summary of what to look for.

    I might add: the signatures often appear to be reduced images of a larger signature. On this ball, for example, there is no way those could be original size considering how fine/thin the writing is. Leather is soft and the pen point would have made much wider stroke.

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