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1989 PSA 10 Ken Griffey Jr. Prices

I just was looking at prices for the 89 Ken Griffey Jr, PSA 10 cards. I can't believe it. What does everyone here think? Still going up? Bubble to burst? Will the prices hold?

PackManInNC
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Comments

  • ndleondleo Posts: 3,274 ✭✭✭

    I completed the major 1989 Griffey RC PSA 10 run a few years ago. The last two I bought and paid what I thought at the time was huge price.

    Now I am contemplating breaking it up because the prices are just nuts.

    Mike
  • mexpo75mexpo75 Posts: 1,571 ✭✭✭

    But do we think it will continue to rise? It just seems way too high considering how much unopened product is out there.

    PackManInNC
  • mexpo75mexpo75 Posts: 1,571 ✭✭✭

    What is reasonable price on this card?

    PackManInNC
  • 80sOPC80sOPC Posts: 482 ✭✭✭

    I’d be wary of anything that has doubled or tripled in a matter of weeks.

    Said it before, this feels like 1990 all over again where new “investors” pile into the hobby and drive prices of widely available product through the roof. We are pretty clearly in the euphoric/ mania /delusion stage of the bubble - just check out BO, most think that prices will continue to go up forever...thats delusion. Next stage, and I have no idea when it will come, is the blowoff. And it will happen, it always does. Don’t believe me see US Real Estate 2007-2009. This is the card collecting equivalent of a stripper owning 5 homes, will not end well.

  • dustinspeaksdustinspeaks Posts: 95 ✭✭
    edited May 15, 2020 6:25PM

    The thing about Canseco. Nobody who wasn't following sports in the late 1980s is going to look at that Canseco RC and see it as a 1000 dollar card. Canseco won Rookie of the Year and lead the league in home runs 2 years. RBI leader 1 year. 2 World Series rings. Isn't that about it? Hit .266. Had some home runs. Didn't hit 500 home runs. Canseco in the 80s is like Frank Howard was in the 60s.

    Canseco did do Madonna though. HIm and Vanilla Ice. So there is that.

    Maybe these will take off in the pandemic frenzy.

    Only in a 10.

  • 2dueces2dueces Posts: 1,988 ✭✭✭✭
    edited May 16, 2020 12:25PM

    That’s just insane. PSA 9’s average sale $120. PSA 10, $1500-2000. I’m not even going to look at the pop report but my guess it’s in the same range as 86’s Jordan’s.

    Edit to add I noticed the $120 price was March sales. Now $200 is more realistic, higher for dead centered examples. Maybe candidates for crack and submit or at least the buyer might think so.



    << <i>In Rememberance of James W. Brennan Sr. 1924-1982.
    Dad, Thanks for everything you did for me. >>

  • JoeBanzaiJoeBanzai Posts: 7,052 ✭✭✭✭✭

    There are cards that people just WANT. Call them "iconic".

    People want the UD Griffey and the Donruss Canseco.

    It doesn't matter that Rose isn't in the HOF and the same goes for McGwire, who's 1985 rookie just went for $5,000.00 (another went for $3,650.00).

    Will the "bubble" burst? So far, it has not in PSA10 for certain popular players.

    2013,14 and 15 Certificate Award Winner Harmon Killebrew Master Set and Master Topps Set
  • 2dueces2dueces Posts: 1,988 ✭✭✭✭

    Curiosity got the best of me.
    Griffey PSA 10. 24,869
    Jordan PSA 10. 17,231

    Plus untold 9’s that might have a chance.



    << <i>In Rememberance of James W. Brennan Sr. 1924-1982.
    Dad, Thanks for everything you did for me. >>

  • mrvgexmrvgex Posts: 93 ✭✭✭
    edited May 16, 2020 9:35AM

    Not sure where you got your numbers, but here are the actual numbers from the pop report:
    1986 Fleer #57 Jordan PSA 10: 312
    1989 Upper Deck #1 Griffey Jr PSA 10: 3799

    Ray Guy is in the Hall of Fame!
  • 80sOPC80sOPC Posts: 482 ✭✭✭

    Since you mentioned Rose, his high grade rc’s are off 50% from the 2016 peak. Same goes for numerous other popular vintage baseball rc’s.

    Lots and lots and lots of precedence for hobby boom and bust. I remember all the new collectors that poured into the hobby in 1990 and jacked prices through the roof because we all knew that this demand would last forever, people would want this stuff forever.

    @JoeBanzai said:
    There are cards that people just WANT. Call them "iconic".

    People want the UD Griffey and the Donruss Canseco.

    It doesn't matter that Rose isn't in the HOF and the same goes for McGwire, who's 1985 rookie just went for $5,000.00 (another went for $3,650.00).

    Will the "bubble" burst? So far, it has not in PSA10 for certain popular players.

  • 2dueces2dueces Posts: 1,988 ✭✭✭✭
    edited May 16, 2020 12:28PM

    I guess it’s time for me to really examine my KG Jr’s. See if any of the 9’s are worth cracking. I know I have a few raw and at least one might be worth subbing.



    << <i>In Rememberance of James W. Brennan Sr. 1924-1982.
    Dad, Thanks for everything you did for me. >>

  • ReggieClevelandReggieCleveland Posts: 3,370 ✭✭✭✭✭

    @JoeBanzai said:
    There are cards that people just WANT. Call them "iconic".

    People want the UD Griffey and the Donruss Canseco.

    It doesn't matter that Rose isn't in the HOF and the same goes for McGwire, who's 1985 rookie just went for $5,000.00 (another went for $3,650.00).

    Will the "bubble" burst? So far, it has not in PSA10 for certain popular players.

    I 100% agree about the iconic part and that being in the HOF doesn't matter (only in the sense that their cards will go even higher when they actually get in though) but I've gotta call bullshart on both of those McGwire sales.

    The PWCC was textbook shill it to hell and back, knowing you're going to win the auction, but at least you'll get to see what the highest someone is willing to pay and you'll manipulate the market while you're at it. This is what's known in the industry as a "Brent Blue Plate Special." "Winner" has (53) feedback and 90% bids with PWCC.

    The $5k sale is horse malarkey and will never be paid for and never exchanged hands. Again, straight out of the price manipulation textbook.

    Arthur

  • handymanhandyman Posts: 4,319 ✭✭✭
    edited May 16, 2020 1:47PM

    Seems to be the same playbook as the 1955 Clemente PSA 8.
    Past sales
    5k,5k,6k,5k,5k,5k,5k,5k,11k,30k,20k,32k,60k,100k,150k,65k,50k 22k,30k,40k,ect

  • JoeBanzaiJoeBanzai Posts: 7,052 ✭✭✭✭✭

    @ReggieCleveland said:

    @JoeBanzai said:
    There are cards that people just WANT. Call them "iconic".

    People want the UD Griffey and the Donruss Canseco.

    It doesn't matter that Rose isn't in the HOF and the same goes for McGwire, who's 1985 rookie just went for $5,000.00 (another went for $3,650.00).

    Will the "bubble" burst? So far, it has not in PSA10 for certain popular players.

    I 100% agree about the iconic part and that being in the HOF doesn't matter (only in the sense that their cards will go even higher when they actually get in though) but I've gotta call bullshart on both of those McGwire sales.

    The PWCC was textbook shill it to hell and back, knowing you're going to win the auction, but at least you'll get to see what the highest someone is willing to pay and you'll manipulate the market while you're at it. This is what's known in the industry as a "Brent Blue Plate Special." "Winner" has (53) feedback and 90% bids with PWCC.

    The $5k sale is horse malarkey and will never be paid for and never exchanged hands. Again, straight out of the price manipulation textbook.

    Arthur

    I can't say if any particular auction is BS or not, but my point was simply that certain players/cards are chased more than they "should" be.

    The McGwire card is very tough to get in a PSA 10, out of 45,000 submissions only 302 10's. I would not give you $10.00 for that card as a part of my PC.

    2013,14 and 15 Certificate Award Winner Harmon Killebrew Master Set and Master Topps Set
  • Pete Rose is one of the most infamous baseball players of all time. Being banned from the hall actually increases his popularity. Mark McGwire was one of the guys hitting home runs in what may be the most exciting period in baseball history in the last 30 years. He broke Roger Maris' home run record that had stood for nearly 37 years. If he doesn't make the hall its for reasons similar to Rose. Canseco didn't do much. People just like to look at that picture of his mug. Long term the number of people who think that picture is special are going to drop. That card is one of the most interesting cards from the mid 80s. Which is sad.

    The Hall of Fame does matter. When people entering the hobby are figuring out what they're going to buy, the Hall of Fame list plays a huge part in that. Being in the Hall of Fame guarantees your cards will be sought after for as long as the hobby exists. Being in the hall creates demand. There really aren't many guys who aren't in the hall who people collect.

    Vanilla Ice isn't in the hall either.

  • JoeBanzaiJoeBanzai Posts: 7,052 ✭✭✭✭✭
    edited May 16, 2020 9:35PM

    @dustinspeaks said:
    Pete Rose is one of the most infamous baseball players of all time. Being banned from the hall actually increases his popularity. Mark McGwire was one of the guys hitting home runs in what may be the most exciting period in baseball history in the last 30 years. He broke Roger Maris' home run record that had stood for nearly 37 years. If he doesn't make the hall its for reasons similar to Rose. Canseco didn't do much. People just like to look at that picture of his mug. Long term the number of people who think that picture is special are going to drop. That card is one of the most interesting cards from the mid 80s. Which is sad.

    The Hall of Fame does matter. When people entering the hobby are figuring out what they're going to buy, the Hall of Fame list plays a huge part in that. Being in the Hall of Fame guarantees your cards will be sought after for as long as the hobby exists. Being in the hall creates demand. There really aren't many guys who aren't in the hall who people collect.

    Vanilla Ice isn't in the hall either.

    The HOF matters sometimes, being banned from the HOF probably does increase Pete's card prices.

    People buy what they like.

    Canseco was a very very good player, his OPS is 105th all time.

    Some HOFers cards are not sought after, see Jim Thome and Larry Walker.

    2013,14 and 15 Certificate Award Winner Harmon Killebrew Master Set and Master Topps Set
  • HOF matters for every dude pre-1984 and Thurmon Munson. I think that's pretty much the rule.

  • 2dueces2dueces Posts: 1,988 ✭✭✭✭

    @mrvgex said:
    Not sure where you got your numbers, but here are the actual numbers from the pop report:
    1986 Fleer #57 Jordan PSA 10: 312
    1989 Upper Deck #1 Griffey Jr PSA 10: 3799

    Sorry. Must have been total graded. My bad.



    << <i>In Rememberance of James W. Brennan Sr. 1924-1982.
    Dad, Thanks for everything you did for me. >>

  • JoeBanzaiJoeBanzai Posts: 7,052 ✭✭✭✭✭

    @dustinspeaks said:
    HOF matters for every dude pre-1984 and Thurmon Munson. I think that's pretty much the rule.

    Please clarify.

    Munson isn't in the HOF and neither is Mattingly, yet both are very aggressively collected. Both great players and Yankees. Being Yankees seems to be more of a factor than being (or in this case not being) HOFers. Going into the HOF isn't going to effect their card prices too much.

    On the other hand, who would have given you $1,000.00 for a Harold Baines rookie before he made it in? His rookie card STILL goes for less than a Pete Rose card from 1981!

    Now we're going back 36 years for the HOF to matter?

    The HOF is only one factor in why people collect, others are who they played for and championship teams they played on. It's by no means "the rule", but does matter, sometimes.

    Perfect (pre 1984) example; Harmon Killebrew and Sandy Koufax. Both were rookies in 1955, yet Koufax's cards worth WAY more than Killebrew's, about 5 times as expensive. Killebrew's cards are also a bit tougher to find in high grade.

    Koufax, playing in LA and winning championships has a much bigger factor than HOF.

    2013,14 and 15 Certificate Award Winner Harmon Killebrew Master Set and Master Topps Set
  • ReggieClevelandReggieCleveland Posts: 3,370 ✭✭✭✭✭

    @dustinspeaks said:
    HOF matters for every dude pre-1984 and Thurmon Munson. I think that's pretty much the rule.

    Joe Jackson says "hi."

    Arthur

  • ReggieClevelandReggieCleveland Posts: 3,370 ✭✭✭✭✭

    @dustinspeaks said:
    HOF matters for every dude pre-1984 and Thurmon Munson. I think that's pretty much the rule.

    This is an incredibly ignorant comment. So players aren't collected until they're inducted into the HOF? What about Buck Weaver? Are his cards popular? What about Obaks and Zeenuts? Are those cards popular? The list of cards that are wildly popular that depict players not in the HOF is endless.

    Applying a finite, blanket rule to an entire set has a zero winning percentage throughout history. Canseco was nothing short of a phenomenon for the largest group of collectors the hobby has ever seen at one time. That's not significant? You clearly have zero foresight.

    I hate using this word but you're a textbook definition of a hater. You continuously pop into all of these threads and just chirp the same thing over and over and that's how bad these things are. We get it. You didn't collect in the 1980s, you don't understand the allure, and you don't want to spend any of your money on it. That's fine. We heard you the first ten times you said it.

    Arthur

  • emaremar Posts: 209 ✭✭✭

    @dustinspeaks said:
    HOF matters for every dude pre-1984 and Thurmon Munson. I think that's pretty much the rule.

    Card collecting as been around for 100+ years. The 80's launched a broad base collector's base.
    Read the "your best card as a kid collector" thread. Canseco, Mattingly, Gooden rookies (arguably the most iconic of the 80's) were pretty much untouchable to the 80's kids.

    HOF or not, every generation has their heroes. Today's prices (bubble-ish or not), demand is overwhelming the supply

  • @JoeBanzai said:

    >

    Munson isn't in the HOF and neither is Mattingly, yet both are very aggressively collected. Both great players and Yankees. Being Yankees seems to be more of a factor than being (or in this case not being) HOFers. Going into the HOF isn't going to effect their card prices too much.

    Firstly, I'm sort of joking. But not entirely. I said, being in the hall of fame matters for every guy pre-1984 and Thurmon Munson. Mattingly is exactly why I said pre-1984. Because people collect him even though he fell off. Munson died young. Had he not died it could have gone either way. Bains didn't matter till he hit the Hall. His O-Pee-Chee card seems to be the one. Sandy Koufax and Harmon Killebrew, both Hall of Famers.

    @ReggieCleveland said:

    Joe Jackson says "hi."

    Arthur

    I say earlier in the thread that Pete Rose being banned is probably increasing the value of his cards. Infamous. Joe Jackson is pretty much in the same boat. The scandal has kept him relevant though. That and his cook nickname. :) I don't think most collectors can name 3 dudes who played during Joe Jackson career. Like, without wiki or something.

    Also, I know there are those edge of the sheet commons that nobody can find centered that people are willing to pay 1000 dollars for if they find one that got cut right. But 99 percent of the people collecting don't know who those guys are. And there are the low pop guys who from pre-1930 who nobody can find for their sets. I am also aware that there are sets out there in which every card has, great value. But in a set like that there are always stars that have more value. There are also HOFers in all those sets. And to call most of those sets popular is a stretch. Once guys get to sets like those, they are on the fringe.

    @emar said:

    Card collecting as been around for 100+ years. The 80's launched a broad base collector's base.
    Read the "your best card as a kid collector" thread. Canseco, Mattingly, Gooden rookies (arguably the most iconic of the 80's) were pretty much untouchable to the 80's kids.

    Mattling, Gooden and Canseco won't be as relevant looking back. Aside from being cards that were hard for the kids of that era to get. There's nothing to keep them in the spotlight. In hindsight, baseball in the 1980s and 1990s was a pretty big letdown. Larry Walker and Thome going to the hall. But people just want Mattingly cause thats the card they wanted as a kid. I've never had a 1984 Donruss Mattingly. I bought what I think is a nice Canseco last night for 35 bucks.

  • ReggieClevelandReggieCleveland Posts: 3,370 ✭✭✭✭✭

    @dustinspeaks said:
    And there are the low pop guys who from pre-1930 who nobody can find for their sets. I am also aware that there are sets out there in which every card has, great value. But in a set like that there are always stars that have more value. There are also HOFers in all those sets. And to call most of those sets popular is a stretch. Once guys get to sets like those, they are on the fringe.

    None of this is accurate. You're basically taking your extremely limited knowledge of the hobby and projecting it onto the entire hobby and saying it's a fact. Your opinion ceases to have credibility.

    Arthur

  • It's accurate. Guys here talk about the hard card in sets all the time. Even common sets have the guys who nobody can find centered and end up paying huge dollars for. Some guy nobody has heard of who played 1 year and hit .176 but who happened to be on the edge of the sheet. Or guys who just never got printed enough to have their cards survive 100 years.

    There are also totally sets out there in which every card is 3k. Unless it has gone through the washer and dryer or something. Even then, sometimes. In those sets there are nearly always guys who are better than the commons. Maybe not a HOFer in every set. There are a ton of obscure sets. I'm sure there are even sets out there who nobody knows the complete checklist for.

    Guys who collect that stuff aren't your average collectors. Those guys probably aren't buying PSA 10 1989 Upper Deck Griffey for anything more than 25% eBay. Probably because they bought it in 1995 or something. I can totally see how if you read about this stuff every day your perception may be skewed though.

  • JoeBanzaiJoeBanzai Posts: 7,052 ✭✭✭✭✭

    Sandy Koufax and Harmon Killebrew, both Hall of Famers.

    Yes but why the big price difference? They are both HOFers.

    2013,14 and 15 Certificate Award Winner Harmon Killebrew Master Set and Master Topps Set
  • @JoeBanzai said:

    Sandy Koufax and Harmon Killebrew, both Hall of Famers.

    Yes but why the big price difference? They are both HOFers.

    Koufax is often said to be one of the greatest pitches of all time. I haven't compared price. I assume Koufax is higher than Killebrew? Being a Dodger helps Koufax I'm sure. Being a civil rights era Jewish icon probably helps Koufax too. Aside from being a Hall of Famer and 500 home run club, I don't know why people buy Killabrew. I think it's safe to say that more people collect the Hall of Fame than limit themselves to the 500 Home Run Club. There are degrees. The Hall of Fame is sort of the bar.

  • JoeBanzaiJoeBanzai Posts: 7,052 ✭✭✭✭✭

    You sure don't seem to know much about what you are talking about.

    You say that the HOF "matters" and of course since all the guys in the HOF are great (NO, I don't want to start a debate on guys like Harold Baines), they are going to have people buying their cards. Not because they are in the HOF, because they are great players.

    Koufax was nowhere near being the greatest pitcher of all time. Killebrew is one of the top 8 home run hitters of all time.

    You obviously don't want to look at card prices. A PSA 8 Killebrew rookie sells for $2,000.00, a PSA 8 Koufax rookie sells for $8,000.00. Let's bring in Roberto Clemente, the 3rd HOFer from 1955, his PSA 8 rookie sells for 34-42 THOUSAND dollars.

    The Hall of Fame is not the "bar" in MANY instances. You said it yourself; Koufax was a Dodger and also an icon to a lot of people of his faith.

    People collect great players who they LIKE, guys that played in big markets and guys that won championships.

    If you take the HOF out of the equation, a few guys prices will drop like a rock, most will not.

    People don't care even a little bit that Rose, Bonds and McGwire aren't in the HOF. Larry Walker and Jim Thome made it in and very few seem to care. Thome has 612 home runs and his rookie sells for $60-70.00!!!!

    2013,14 and 15 Certificate Award Winner Harmon Killebrew Master Set and Master Topps Set
  • I didn't say he was the greatest. I said he was one of the greatest.

    Correct, I don't look at 1960s baseball card prices obsessively. Only when I have conversations like this. When I was a kid looking at that stuff all of the prices were black and white text. Now when I look at that stuff it's just a bunch of pictures of dudes. I liked 1950s and 60s cards when I was a kid. Because they were the oldest stuff I could get my hands on. Now, I have no attachment to sports cards. But, If I were to start building my collection again, I can't think of a player from the 1950s and 1960s who is not in the Hall of Fame who I would buy. Yet, I would buy Hall of Fame RCs. I like to look at numbers, I don't put a lot of time in to looking at baseball numbers. But right now it's holding my attention.

    Who is the most expensive RC from the 1950s and 1960s who is not in the Hall of Fame? Excluding Rose. Since he has been excluded.

    The guys who actually like the players from the 50s and 60s are getting old now. You can't take it with you. There's a thread talking about estate planning this week. For someone to actually like Killebrew they would have to be coming up on 70-80. What happens to Killebrew when the guys who actually like him are gone? Considering he's 2k when they're around? Much lower pop than 1989 UD Griffey. Does it make any sense that 1989 UD Griffey would surpass Killebrew RC?

    Man, people do care that Rose isn't in the Hall of Fame. Baseball people do anyway. It's a common topic of conversation. I saw a news story about it in the past 6 months. Bonds and McGwire will be topics just like that as guys my age start getting up there.

    I've been thinking about the Thome and Walker thing. It could be a real bad sign for the hobby. Or it could be an opportunity. There have been threads here recently about how the hobby is losing participants. But, then again, both those guys were printed in huge quantities. I'm not a sports radio or ESPN guy. But, I used to talk about this stuff with friends who were. They used to tell me that Bonds wasn't a likable guy. That his card prices were low because the press didn't like him. I don't know anything about how Walker or Thome are viewed by the press or if the public even really knows who they are. Griffey has had the camera pointed at him since he was a teenager, I believe. His smile sells cards.

  • emaremar Posts: 209 ✭✭✭

    @dustinspeaks said:

    The guys who actually like the players from the 50s and 60s are getting old now. You can't take it with you. There's a thread talking about estate planning this week. For someone to actually like Killebrew they would have to be coming up on 70-80. What happens to Killebrew when the guys who actually like him are gone? Considering he's 2k when they're around? Much lower pop than 1989 UD Griffey. Does it make any sense that 1989 UD Griffey would surpass Killebrew RC?

    With that rationale, T206 Cobb, Cy Young, Speaker, Collins they should all be about 10 bucks apiece as none of us were born yet when they played.

    I've tried to read between the lines with your thoughts & reasoning. Im pretty sure I can't explain it any simpler:
    a Google share = $1386, a Microsoft share = $185, ONE Amazon share = $2476.
    Why?, you ask. Because Mr. Market says so. Shares of these companies are bought & sold on the Nasdaq.
    You say it's too expensive and not reasonable. ANY item is worth what someone else will pay for it.

    Another person on the board is complaining about eTopps. Well I'm sorry. Mr. Market doesn't appreciate them.

    In conclusion:
    eBay is Mr. Market for cards. It has been since it's launch in the 90's.
    You have a buyer and a seller. A market is created.
    It won't last, you say. WHO KNOWS!.....same for Google, Microsoft, Amazon. same for Anything!

    I've said many times; collect for the fun and hobby, not an investment.

  • doubledragondoubledragon Posts: 4,620 ✭✭✭✭✭
    edited May 19, 2020 11:09AM

    Many collectors of the older players aren't necessarily old, they just appreciate the history of the sports that they collect.

    Hello, I'm a Joe Louis card addict.

  • GreenSneakersGreenSneakers Posts: 427 ✭✭✭

    I have a few thoughts on this thread.

    1. Thurman Munson is not in the HoF. Fact checked. To say that he is the only exception to an arbitrary rule is naive. (At least I think that’s the argument being made. I consider my reading comprehension to be above average but some posts in this thread are real head scratchers)

    2. Empirical evidence helps make persuasive arguments. It doesn’t take long to look up card prices. Certainly less time than it takes to craft a multi paragraph post entry.

    3. There are plenty of guys on this board that collect non HoF player for all the reasons stated above. There is a Dave Kingman guy. I dabble in Fred Lynn. There was a huge Ron Santo contingent before he finally made it in. People collect all different things for all different reasons.

    4. We sometimes complain that this board gets boring. Debates are fun. So let’s not all kill the new guy. But new guy should try to educate himself when doing so, else you risk being labeled a troll.

  • dustinspeaksdustinspeaks Posts: 95 ✭✭
    edited May 19, 2020 11:47AM

    What do you think drives the value of Ty Cobb and Cy Young? The value of those cards is completely driven by lore and by inflation. Sometimes by hype and speculation maybe.

    There are fewer PSA graded Ty Cobb cards, from his playing days, than there are PSA 10 1989 Upper Deck Griffey RCs. It's not close. The number may be half. Maybe less than half. You can own Ty Cobb for less than the Griffey too. The thought of inflation is really scary to me when looking at this Griffey price.

    Value is an interesting thing. While it's true that an item was worth what someone paid for it. P.T. Barnum has an interesting quote that also applies here. Maybe you know the quote I'm thinking of? There's also the one that goes "...snow to an Eskimo."

    Stock and sports cards are completely different. One big difference is that companies like Microsoft are still in business. Near zero chance that Microsoft is going to go out of business. If Microsoft goes out of business it will be acquired by another company and magically your Microsoft stock will turn in to stock in that new company. Ty Cobb and Harmon Killebrew aren't in business. Griffey is alive atleast. As Puckett taught us though. Sometimes being alive after your playing days isn't a pro. Then again Ty Cobb was supposed to be a huge A-hole. Word is that nobody liked the guy. Killebrew has nothing other than his record to boost his card values. I don't believe I have ever heard Harmon Killebrew say a single word. Nobody is making the Harmon Killebrew Story movie. Maybe someone should make a documentary.

    Standard Oil was a huge company in 1900. You can still buy it's stock certificates today. But, what is going to drive the value of a Standard Oil Stock Certificate? Lore and inflation.

    @GreenSneakers That guy buying Kingman and you buying Lynn aren't helping the Kingman and Lynn market so much. There was likely a huge Ron Santo contingent because people were speculating on the bump from induction. Guys on that Hall of Fame list get talked about and researched because they're on the list. Are people new to the hobby is getting hyped over Fred Lynn? Is Mattingly going to be the next Fred Lynn in 20 years? When I was a kid Fred Lynn RC stood out in the book. Now, not so much.

  • mrvgexmrvgex Posts: 93 ✭✭✭

    What drives the prices of Picasso paintings? Lore and inflation? It certainly couldn’t be the paint and canvas.

    Ray Guy is in the Hall of Fame!
  • dustinspeaksdustinspeaks Posts: 95 ✭✭
    edited May 19, 2020 1:03PM

    Picasso paintings are all 1/1. The paint and the canvas is what you're buying. But, you're also buying prestige. The value is driven by lore and inflation. Much of the time the buyers, or bidders, aren't spending their own money. Original art and baseball cards is apples and oranges. Except maybe in the most extreme cases. High end art also makes money for the people who display it. It sort of pays a dividend. I think most people would say that looking at a Picasso is more satisfying than looking at Harmon Killebrew. Baseball cards are more similar to Picasso prints. I've got to add, canvas isn't an expensive thing, Neither is old canvas. Art is generally not expensive either. Even old art.

    I once had a discussion with my dad about this. His point of view was that after a piece of art sold at auction it immediately lost most of its value. I'm talking about extremely high end art. His reasoning was that when a bidding war ends the highest bidder is satisfied so only the 2nd highest bidder is left wanting. And that 2nd highest bidder only has number 3 to compete with. Number 3 wasn't near the top of the mark. So number 2 wouldn't have to spend nearly as much if the piece went back on the market. Number 1 has spend a lot of money. That's a "sunk cost" though. I think he is over simplifying it a little. He's mostly right though.

  • This has been on my watch list for about a year.

    Picasso RC? Low pop. 1952.

  • GreenSneakersGreenSneakers Posts: 427 ✭✭✭

    after a piece of art sold at auction it immediately lost most of its value. I'm talking about extremely high end art.

    Oy. You just don't base your arguments in facts, do you?

  • Which facts are you speaking of?

  • mrvgexmrvgex Posts: 93 ✭✭✭

    Oy. You just don't base your arguments in facts, do you?
    He quoted his daddy, that should be good enough for you. 😂

    Ray Guy is in the Hall of Fame!
  • dustinspeaksdustinspeaks Posts: 95 ✭✭
    edited May 19, 2020 4:40PM

    You know Picasso only painted probably 60-80 paintings? Picasso paintings are some of the most valuable objects in the world. Priceless, as they say. But when objects change hands people put numbers even on priceless things. A Picasso painting isn't something you can go to eBay and buy. Most of those paintings will never change hands in your lifetime. Even if you have the money you may not be invited to bid on something like that. If a buyer pays 100-400 million dollars for a painting. Then wants to sell it the next day, it's not like there are a bunch of people that have 100-400 million dollars cash ready to spend, who can spend it on a painting and who have been green lighted as a buyer.

    If you're bidder number #1 and you bid 400 million dollars. Lets say 10 million over bidder #2. Bidder #3 dropped out around 250 million dollars. Then you want to sell it the next day. Is bidder #2 going to honor his 390 million dollar bid? Or is the painting now worth 260 million dollars?

  • doubledragondoubledragon Posts: 4,620 ✭✭✭✭✭

    This thread has become bizarre.

    Hello, I'm a Joe Louis card addict.

  • dan89dan89 Posts: 234 ✭✭✭

    Wow, I didn’t know there would be math.

  • mexpo75mexpo75 Posts: 1,571 ✭✭✭

    Wow! And I started this thread talking about Griffey prices.

    PackManInNC
  • HorseHorse Posts: 460 ✭✭✭

    This thread needs some 1983 Nikkie Six !!!!

  • mexpo75mexpo75 Posts: 1,571 ✭✭✭

    Or popcorn girl!

    PackManInNC
  • not only do i think the prices will maintain, id say by the action on other cards they're undervalued. Griffey has been retired for 10 years and is basically still in every set produced, and this is how deitys are made. And let me tell you his superstar counterparts are next, because if a Jr. 1993 finest base issue is worth $80+, then a 1993 finest base issues of Bonds and McGwire will be more than $10 as well.

    Zack Ziegler

  • hyperchipper09hyperchipper09 Posts: 1,171 ✭✭✭

    I procrastinated over Griffey rookie 10's too much the last couple of years never buying any of his many. And welp, here we are oh well :D Happy I did get my 1989 10's of Prime Time few years back before his left the track. :#

    "Nobody ever defended anything successfully, there is only attack and attack and attack some more. "

  • ndleondleo Posts: 3,274 ✭✭✭

    Has ESPN or anyone ever done a documentary on Griffey? I don't know if his career deserves a 10-part doc, but a 2 hour film with a segment on his impact on the hobby would be an interesting watch.

    Mike
  • mexpo75mexpo75 Posts: 1,571 ✭✭✭

    But back to my original question. Is the Griffey 89 PSA 10, with 3800 graded, to date, have a upside?

    PackManInNC
  • JoeBanzaiJoeBanzai Posts: 7,052 ✭✭✭✭✭
    edited May 22, 2020 6:00AM

    Everybody seems to want one. Demand outweighs the fact that these are available.

    2013,14 and 15 Certificate Award Winner Harmon Killebrew Master Set and Master Topps Set
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