Unopened Investment - What woukd you choose

Which option would you choose from a pure investment POV - assume 10 year time horizon and all BBCE wrapped:

Option 1: (1) 78 Topps wax box
Option 2: (1) 79 OPC wax box + (1) 78 OPC wax box
Option 3: (6) 81 cello boxes
Option 4: (1) PSA 9 cello pack from each yr 1974-82

I started to vote for Option 1, then went to Option 4.....then 3, then 2....decided to get some opinions. Asking for a friend. :)

Comments

  • vintagefunvintagefun Posts: 1,931 ✭✭✭

    Torn between 2 & 4...leaning towards 4. But if 2 was tape intact and wrapped maybe 2.

    52-90 All Sports, Mostly Topps, Mostly HOF, and some assorted wax.
  • waxman2745waxman2745 Posts: 621 ✭✭✭

    I'm torn between 1 and 4. I'd have to say option 1 because it has 24 cello packs. Option 4 is only 9 packs, where only the earlier years will command big money.

    Adam
    collecting O-Pee-Chee (OPC) baseball raw or graded, years 1965, 1966, 1967, 1968, 1969, and 1970
  • tulsaboytulsaboy Posts: 64 ✭✭

    For the money, couldn't you get more than 6 1981 cello boxes? What's a BBCE 1978 Topps wax box running now? Maybe $2500?

  • None of them (if that's a viable option)... I think the best investment would be in a box (or packs) from a popular set with multiple key rookie cards... Like '75 Topps.... I mean, no one really cares about the 1981 Topps set now, so why would they in the future??

    DesertIceSports.Com

  • 70ToppsFanatic70ToppsFanatic Posts: 2,029 ✭✭✭

    I still think every after 1977 is mass produced and there’s a lot of it out there. From an investment standpoint I don’t see the same kind of upside in it as I do for 1977 and earlier.

    I also don’t see the same caliber or quantity of RCs and ATGs in the 1978-1981 timeframe. Other than known print issues limiting the populations of High-end Molitor/Trammel, Smith, and Henderson RCs there’s just not the same kind of chance at hitting a major card I’d you are aiming to sell out to a vintage breaker.

    So I’d go with #4 and earlier.



    Dave
  • dan89dan89 Posts: 162 ✭✭✭

    4

  • softparadesoftparade Posts: 8,119 ✭✭✭✭
    edited April 17, 2019 10:22AM

    Definitely #1

    Eddie Murray Rookie HOF
    Paul Molitor Rookie - HOF / Alan Trammell Rookie HOF - DUAL HOF ROOKIE CARD SICK
    Jack Morris Rookie HOF
    Lou Whitaker Rookie - He's going to get in
    Lance Parrish Rookie
    Nolan Ryan #400 - Incredibly tough in high grade

    This set is a beast! I know, I know, I am biased but even so I choose the '78 Wax box all day, night, and year.

  • DotStoreDotStore Posts: 185 ✭✭✭

    Given those choices, and assumed budget, I would probably go with a 1980 Topps Baseball Wax Box (BBCE)

  • softparadesoftparade Posts: 8,119 ✭✭✭✭
    edited April 17, 2019 10:48AM

    Also I view anything 1985 and earlier as investment material if you are planning to hold for 15 to 20 years. Yes there is a bunch out there but once the 70's and early 80's are gobbled up by the monster the mid 80's are next. The late 80's maybe 100 years from now lol

  • PADIdiverPADIdiver Posts: 129 ✭✭
    edited April 17, 2019 11:25AM

    I'm not sure.. various years is likely more stable price-wise as investment is distributed but gains may also be muted.

  • slum22slum22 Posts: 2,491 ✭✭✭

    If you are looking at a 10 year time horizon, I would consider moving out of baseball and looking into 90's basketball (especially 96 to 98). You are going to see more and more money moving there as kids of that generation find themselves back in the hobby.

    Steve
  • daddymcdaddymc Posts: 3,081 ✭✭✭

    @slum22 said:
    If you are looking at a 10 year time horizon, I would consider moving out of baseball and looking into 90's basketball (especially 96 to 98). You are going to see more and more money moving there as kids of that generation find themselves back in the hobby.

    Shhhhhhhhhh. ;)

    Currently working on: Kurt Warner PSA 9 or 10

  • softparadesoftparade Posts: 8,119 ✭✭✭✭

    Baseball isn’t going anywhere. Unopened baseball will continue to flourish. The hobby would be crippled without it’s rock solid significance.

  • ndleondleo Posts: 2,994 ✭✭✭

    @softparade said:
    Baseball isn’t going anywhere. Unopened baseball will continue to flourish. The hobby would be crippled without it’s rock solid significance.

    Baseball will always be the foundation of the hobby, but you could argue to the most significant products from the mid-1990's to modern are all in football or basketball. There is a ton of growth left in that era.

    Mike
  • handymanhandyman Posts: 4,276 ✭✭✭

    Put all your money on Red and go with the 1978 Box.

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