Can anyone identify this Chinese coin?

It is a coin I acquired 50+ years ago as a YN.

I think it is a cast coin, made prior to 1912. The mint mark identifier indicates that it was made at Boo-Yuwan in Peking.

Any help would be appreciated.


Comments

  • Insider2Insider2 Posts: 11,094 ✭✭✭✭✭

    It is Chinese cash but you and everyone here already knows that and has not decided to post the obvious. I'm away from my books :( but you should get an answer soon. :)

    While you are waiting, you might try going to the internet to search the "images." With what you know already you should be able to find it.

  • MrBreezeMrBreeze Posts: 886 ✭✭✭

    Emperor Ren Zong 1796-1820

    Jia Qing tong bao

    Board of Works mint

  • SanctionIISanctionII Posts: 8,930 ✭✭✭✭✭

    Thank you Mr. Breeze and Mr. Insider.

    I was able to look up information and photos on the coin.

    Now I am left wondering how this coin made it from China from when it was minted 198 to 222 years ago to Denver, Colorado, USA in the 1960's when I acquired it as a YN. It has had an interesting journey and it would be great to learn its personal history.

  • sylsyl Posts: 551 ✭✭✭

    Chinese workers on the railroads.

  • BillDugan1959BillDugan1959 Posts: 2,689 ✭✭✭✭✭

    My Aunt had a number of woven baskets with lids that were decorated with these Chinese Cash coins and red ribbons and goldine braid. She used the baskets for sewing supplies, as possibly her Grandmother had before her. I'd bet she still has them. The Cash coins are mostly very common.

    Copies are being made in China today, although many of these are very poorly done or are the wrong sizes.

  • santeliasantelia Posts: 137 ✭✭

    Hey SanctionII;
    Why this coin would be in Denver? Perhaps it belonged to George Fisher; George was a chinese cash collector that translated Ding Fubao's Catalogue of Chinese Coins, and made it available to American collectors. It was spread around by xerox copy, (much like Jazz music fakebooks) among the Chinese collectors. I'm pretty sure he lived in Littleton, CO before he passed away. I had the pleasure of having some email correspondence with him before then. I have no idea how old he was at the time, but he was wonderfully gracious to me as a collector starting in Chinese coins. I'm fortunate to have maybe 10-12 of his coins in my collection, and I can't bear to break them out of the old cardboard flips, because they still have his handwriting and notes on them. Thanks for this memory!
    Syl is right. On the west coast. there have been hoards recovered from Chinese workers, and in San Francisco, or Vancouver BC. Here on the east coast a lot of the older coins came over in missionary collections in the late 1800's/early 1900's, plus the coin collecting boom of the 1960's. I've purchased bulk coins from hoards in Vietnam, especially now that China has cut of exports of coinage, and the counterfeits have increased so much.

    Chinese cash enthusiast
  • AUandAGAUandAG Posts: 21,143 ✭✭✭✭✭

    @SanctionII said:
    Thank you Mr. Breeze and Mr. Insider.

    I was able to look up information and photos on the coin.

    Now I am left wondering how this coin made it from China from when it was minted 198 to 222 years ago to Denver, Colorado, USA in the 1960's when I acquired it as a YN. It has had an interesting journey and it would be great to learn its personal history.

    The Chinese not only worked the railroads but they worked in mines and had businesses to support miners. Many times they owned laundrys, poultry shops, etc. We find them metal detecting old mining camps. I just cover them back up and move along, though. Never thought about keeping one!!
    Colorado sure had its share of miners and mines back in that time period.

    bob :)

    BST deals: Dozens of buys/sells. Will provide a list upon request.
    Registry: CC lowballs (boblindstrom), [email protected]
  • Timbuk3Timbuk3 Posts: 10,490 ✭✭✭✭✭

    Interesting information. Thank you all for sharing !!! :)

    Timbuk3
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