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How can we show the perfection of a coin through plastic?

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Is there a way that you can hold the actual coin and it carry a PCGS number and separately have a protected safety plastic "wallet”?

I am understand the value to "slabbing" but would like to hold say a Roman Imperial Bronze and examine it in the hand. Today the smallest detail from a pin hole in the edge to the incredible patination on coins that have first been rebuilt with epoxy this take incredible skill of both the dealer and collector.

Have I got everything wrong?

Petition Crown
The Worlds Most Prestigious and Valuable Silver Coin. Thomas Simon and two Kings of Numismatics together Petition Crown & 1804 $

Comments

  • rickoricko Posts: 98,724 ✭✭✭✭✭

    Once out of the slab, it loses the assurance of grade and authenticity. I do understand the allure of examining coins in hand...I have many raw coins .....However, if you want the security of a TPG slab, it must remain intact. Cheers, RickO

  • jmlanzafjmlanzaf Posts: 31,826 ✭✭✭✭✭

    @petitioncrown said:
    Latest Face-Book header

    Is there a way that you can hold the actual coin and it carry a PCGS number and separately have a protected safety plastic "wallet”?

    I am understand the value to "slabbing" but would like to hold say a Roman Imperial Bronze and examine it in the hand. Today the smallest detail from a pin hole in the edge to the incredible patination on coins that have first been rebuilt with epoxy this take incredible skill of both the dealer and collector.

    Have I got everything wrong?

    What you want is the old "photograde". Before slabbing, they actually certified the picture of the coin.

    I would think that you could accomplish some of what you want by using the PCGS photo option. Technically, once out of the holder it isn't slabbed anymore. But if you had the registry number and the photo proofs, you would have "evidence" of the 3rd party opinion.

  • cmerlo1cmerlo1 Posts: 7,891 ✭✭✭✭✭

    Another alternative (though I'm sure not an acceptable one to many collectors) would be to micro-laser etch a serial # on the edge of the coin. I believe they do this with some gemstones now. My concerns would be making it secure and impossible to fake, and making it 100% invisible unless under powerful magnification. Also, it would probably be difficult to do on coins with reeded edges.

    You Suck! Awarded 6/2008- 1901-O Micro O Morgan, 8/2008- 1878 VAM-123 Morgan, 9/2022 1888-O VAM-1B3 H8 Morgan | Senior Regional Representative- ANACS Coin Grading. Posted opinions on coins are my own, and are not an official ANACS opinion.
  • ZoinsZoins Posts: 33,811 ✭✭✭✭✭

    @cmerlo1 said:
    Another alternative (though I'm sure not an acceptable one to many collectors) would be to micro-laser etch a serial # on the edge of the coin. I believe they do this with some gemstones now. My concerns would be making it secure and impossible to fake, and making it 100% invisible unless under powerful magnification. Also, it would probably be difficult to do on coins with reeded edges.

    That could certainly kill the upgrade market. Imagine the coins that are resubmitted 20 times?

  • GoldenEggGoldenEgg Posts: 1,922 ✭✭✭✭✭
    edited September 18, 2017 8:45AM

    But I thought the only reason people had their coins slabbed was to hide the flaws. All slabbed coins must be flawed ;)

  • Insider2Insider2 Posts: 14,452 ✭✭✭✭✭

    What one TPGS authenticator has written is that one day in the future "slabs" will be round capsules (similar to "Kointains") with micro info (grade, etc.) on the edge and Whitman folders will once again be made to plug the your collection into. B)

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