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Has anyone seen this before?

I have 2 notes that appear to be from Sudetenland and Lower Silesia, the 1945 Kassenschein Emergency Issue, Pick 187. However, these 2 notes have stamps attached, which the notes should not have. The stamps are Czechoslovakian, and look to be issued from 1929 - 1937, which makes me think they may have been attached in the period right after WWII.

Has anyone come across anything like this, or know anything about it?

Comments

  • JimnightJimnight Posts: 8,411 ✭✭✭✭✭

    That's interesting.

  • In 1938 the Sudetenland was annexed to the German Reich. Letters with the stamps often had the imprint "Wir sind frei".
    I have also seen the banknotes only without stamps. Possibly someone wanted to make a reference to the liberation of the Germans in the Sudetenland. Maybe I should have asked my grandmother at the time.

  • Serial_no_8Serial_no_8 Posts: 70 ✭✭
    edited February 19, 2021 1:53PM

    @Marty111 said:
    I have also seen the banknotes only without stamps. Possibly someone wanted to make a reference to the liberation of the Germans in the Sudetenland. Maybe I should have asked my grandmother at the time.

    • What's interesting about the OP notes is that they're only 51 apart but different stamps. Nice pair!
  • JBKJBK Posts: 8,887 ✭✭✭✭✭

    I know nothing about these issues but I do know that when Czechoslovakia split in two both the Czech Republic and Slovakia used special stamps added to the existing Czechoslovakia notes to validate them until new issues could be printed.

    Immediate postwar Germany did something similar, I believe.

    The "cancellations" on your stamps do not look like postmarks, so I am wondering if it was some sort of validation stamp.

  • Namvet69Namvet69 Posts: 4,978 ✭✭✭✭✭

    I agree that the stamps look to be overprinted rather than cancelled. Lot of that going on in Germany. I'm thinking it's kinda like notgeld to extend the value of the note. IMO. Peace Roy

  • The Allied Military Government ordered all local issues recalled as soon as they became aware of them. These notes were part of that order. Since these notes were issued in the name of the Reichsbank, they would not have been an obligation of the Czech government and it is doubtful the Czech government would want them circulating in the Sudetenland post war.

    I would be very wary of any WWII era notes with stamps (gummed or rubber) affixed to them.

  • Appreciate the feedback. Ive decided to just send them to get graded and let's see what the experts say about them. In 6 months when the grading gets back ill post the results...

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