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New Book: United States Classic Gold Coins of 1834-1839

RonyahskiRonyahski Posts: 3,003 ✭✭✭✭✭
edited March 26, 2020 7:36AM in U.S. Coin Forum

United States Classic Gold Coins of 1834-1839

Standard Edition

“Buy the book before the coin.” Sage advice if there is a book to buy. Every coin series in U.S. history has a book dedicated to it except one, Classic Gold. Minted from 1834 to 1839 and falling between the series of the old standard preceding it and the newer series that followed, Classic Gold quarter eagles and half eagles are betwixt and between. No comprehensive and authoritative reference guide has been written about these beautifully designed coins. Their story has never been told, until now.
United States Classic Gold Coins of 1834-1839, a book written by Daryl J. Haynor, presents information about every aspect of the Classic Gold quarter eagle and half eagle series that a collector needs to knowledgeably and confidently collect them. The work assembles for the first time a complete die marriage listing for every date in each series, emission sequencing, and a detailed system for identifying marriages with high quality color photographs. Rarity ratings of each die marriage are given, backed by an exhaustive search of thousands of records of gold coin sales.
The book includes an analysis of the characteristics of Classic Gold coins by date, including luster, color, strike, and other die characteristics. It provides estimates of the survivors of each date broken down by grade ranges based on statistical analysis of third- party population reports and auctions. It also documents reasons why several official mintage figures of the U.S. Mint need to be adjusted.
Mr. Haynor has conducted an exhaustive study of the finest examples of each date, and a condition census list with detailed provenance records is included. In many cases this information will be published for the first time. Most listings include high quality color photos.
But Classic Gold is much more than a reference book. The 1830’s was perhaps the most dynamic decade in the history of the U.S. Mint, and economically one the most traumatic for the country. The book explores the economic and political context of the 1830's by "following the money" through these turbulent times, including President Jackson's push for a bimetallic monetary system, the Second Bank Wars and its ultimate demise, and changing the gold standard. It chronicles the role of the gold in French indemnity payments, the relocation of Native Americans, and the Panic of 1837. And it explores U.S. Mint operations which went through big changes during that decade, including the introduction of the steam toggle press, the opening of the new Philadelphia Mint, Christian Gobrecht’s arrival as Engraver, and the construction of branch mints in Charlotte, Dahlonega, and New Orleans.
Classic Gold coinage was the tool Jackson used to implement his financial policy based on specie. It was the first coinage under a new gold standard, the first to create a public uproar over the omission of E PLURIBUS UNUM on U.S. coinage, the first coinage struck at the Branch Mints, and the first U.S coinage with a mintmark on the obverse.
The historic section of the book is based on hundreds of hours of research involving documents probably never read by anyone with a numismatic interest for two hundred years. The book includes facsimiles of many exciting and never before published archival documents such as a new allegorical drawing by Engraver William Kneass of Miss Liberty, a letter from President Andrew Jackson accepting the first Classic Head gold coin minted, and Gold Bullion Mint Certificate No. 1 issued by the Charlotte Mint on the first day of operations.
Classic Gold includes many other documents for the first time, including those surrounding the striking of rare Proof Classic Gold coins. The book includes an analysis of these coins, detailing their provenance and telling stories of some of their most famous collectors, featuring the King of Siam Presentation Set which is perhaps the most famous and most valuable set of U.S. coinage ever assembled.
The book will debunk some widely accepted tales of numismatic history that are not accurate, but are “numislore”, that: old tenor gold was melted in masses by the U.S. Mint as a result of changing the gold standard in 1834; E PLURIBUS UNUM was removed, as well as the cap from Miss Liberty, in order to distinguish the change in weight of U.S. gold coins; in 1835 Christian Gobrecht took over all activities as engraver after the debilitating illness of William Kneass.
This work contains valuable materials gathered by John McCloskey, respected author of works on other coin series, whose ground-breaking articles about Classic Gold aroused Mr. Haynor’s interest. Mr. McCloskey researched Classic Gold for over twenty years. He discovered and reported new die marriages, and many had been eagerly awaiting his book. Unfortunately, Mr. McCloskey passed away in 2018, but his family has generously turned his materials over to Mr. Haynor. His seminal research will be acknowledged and memorialized through the naming regime of die marriages detailed in the book.
Professional Coin Grading Services (PCGS) and the Numismatic Guaranty Corporation (NGC) have adopted the HM (Haynor-McCloskey) attribution system and will attribute Classic Gold coins submitted through their services. Stack’s Bowers and Heritage Auctions now attribute their auction listings using the HM system.
Mr. Haynor has been an avid collector for decades. He has compiled a collection of Classic Gold that is the finest ever known, and is near completion of the first ever collection to include every die marriage in both series. He would have found a book like this one invaluable, but none existed. Instead he was compelled to undertake a rewarding but at times arduous research over twelve years into all aspects of Classic Gold. He is now prepared to pass on this knowledge in one comprehensive work so that collectors finally will be able to “buy the book before the coin.”
The hardbound book is 368 pages in length, printed in full color with over 700 full color high-resolution illustrations. United States Classic Gold Coins of 1834-1839 by Daryl J. Haynor, with John W. McCloskey, is available from Wizard Coin Supply at Wizardcoinsupply.com. The book is priced at $95, but is now available for a limited time at a discounted pre-release price.
A limited-edition leatherette version of only 75 copies is priced at $195 but also available at a pre-release price.
For more information, or to order, see: United States Classic Gold Coins of 1834-1839 (https://www.wizardcoinsupply.com/united-states-classic-gold-coins-of-1834-1839)

Deluxe Edition

Some refer to overgraded slabs as Coffins. I like to think of them as Happy Coins.

Comments

  • TomBTomB Posts: 15,744 ✭✭✭✭✭

    Fantastic! Count me in for a Deluxe Edition!

    Thomas Bush Numismatics & Numismatic Photography

    In honor of the memory of Cpl. Michael E. Thompson

    image
  • SmudgeSmudge Posts: 5,049 ✭✭✭✭✭

    Great. Thanks for the heads up.

  • BoosibriBoosibri Posts: 8,576 ✭✭✭✭✭

    Bought the deluxe autographed edition. Congrats on the book!

  • SonorandesertratSonorandesertrat Posts: 5,078 ✭✭✭✭✭

    I already ordered a deluxe copy.

    Member: EAC, NBS, C4, CWTS, ANA

    RMR: 'Wer, wenn ich schriee, hörte mich denn aus der Engel Ordnungen?'

    CJ: 'No one!' [Ain't no angels in the coin biz]
  • NicNic Posts: 2,985 ✭✭✭✭

    Awesome Daryl !

  • johnny9434johnny9434 Posts: 20,724 ✭✭✭✭✭

    Way cool

  • GoBustGoBust Posts: 307 ✭✭✭✭

    Website not working to order. Another source?

  • rickoricko Posts: 72,551 ✭✭✭✭✭

    Great!! Another one to add to my gold library. Cheers, RickO

  • JustacommemanJustacommeman Posts: 19,595 ✭✭✭✭✭

    Hiya Daryl! Congrats!

    Is the standard version paperback and the deluxe version hard/leather bound? Just wanted to make sure as I’m a hardcover guy

    Thanks!

    m

    Walker Proof Digital Album
    Fellas, leave the tight pants to the ladies. If I can count the coins in your pockets you better use them to call a tailor. Stay thirsty my friends......
  • RonyahskiRonyahski Posts: 3,003 ✭✭✭✭✭

    @Justacommeman said:
    Hiya Daryl! Congrats!

    Is the standard version paperback and the deluxe version hard/leather bound? Just wanted to make sure as I’m a hardcover guy

    Thanks!

    m

    Hi - The standard version is hardbound casewrap and the deluxe is hardbound leather. The standard has cover art on the back. The deluxe will have other higher quality aspects, such as premium end wraps, glossy gold foil stamping, and three raised bands on the spine.

    Some refer to overgraded slabs as Coffins. I like to think of them as Happy Coins.
  • JustacommemanJustacommeman Posts: 19,595 ✭✭✭✭✭

    @Boosibri said:
    Mark is a deluxe kinda guy

    For sure on this one but I’m very much a free free free kind of guy when the opportunity presents itself. That always makes me happy and causes an eye roll from my wife o:)

    m

    Walker Proof Digital Album
    Fellas, leave the tight pants to the ladies. If I can count the coins in your pockets you better use them to call a tailor. Stay thirsty my friends......
  • mvs7mvs7 Posts: 1,473 ✭✭✭✭✭

    Very cool! Congrats on finishing the book... a great accomplishment. I've put an order in for a copy.

  • BoosibriBoosibri Posts: 8,576 ✭✭✭✭✭

    @Justacommeman said:

    @Boosibri said:
    Mark is a deluxe kinda guy

    For sure on this one but I’m very much a free free free kind of guy when the opportunity presents itself. That always makes me happy and causes an eye roll from my wife o:)

    m

    My wife is of privilege and looks down at me for coupons and returning bottles for the 10c refund.

  • ffcoinsffcoins Posts: 295 ✭✭✭

    This sounds great!

  • RonyahskiRonyahski Posts: 3,003 ✭✭✭✭✭

    @GoBust said:
    Website not working to order. Another source?

    Wizard has exclusive distribution. They just updated their site today, and the link in the press release did not work for a couple hours. It is working now.

    Some refer to overgraded slabs as Coffins. I like to think of them as Happy Coins.
  • TomBTomB Posts: 15,744 ✭✭✭✭✭

    It worked for me when I ordered it at 3:00 this afternoon.

    Thomas Bush Numismatics & Numismatic Photography

    In honor of the memory of Cpl. Michael E. Thompson

    image
  • yosclimberyosclimber Posts: 2,839 ✭✭✭✭✭
    edited March 25, 2020 7:31PM

    It's great to see John McCloskey's work completed after his passing, by Daryl Haynor.
    McCloskey is well known for his books on Early Dimes, and Early Half Dimes with coauthors,
    and he was founder and president of the Liberty Seated Collectors Club for decades.

    I'm in a somewhat similar situation, working on completing a reference/book on
    Liberty Seated Half Dimes, building on published info and on database notes and photos
    of the reference collection of Stephen Crain, who had been working on a book.


    LSCC Patriarch
    John McCloskey passes!

    As published in a special announcement on December 26, 2018 to all E-Gobrecht addressees, John McCloskey died
    on December 15, 2018. John was an extremely well-known and admired numismatist, mentor, friend, father, and
    family man. John was the Past President of the Liberty Seated Collectors Club and the Gobrecht Journal Editor for
    40 years.
    Here is his obituary as reported in the Dayton [Ohio] Daily News:
    McCLOSKEY, John W. "Jack" PhD 80, passed away Saturday, December 15, 2018. He was preceded in
    death by his parents John H. and Helen McCloskey, a grandson and a niece. He is survived by his loving wife of
    58 years Norma Jean (Monnin) and his four children Susan (Jim) Anderson, John T. (Marianne) McCloskey, Lisa
    (Todd) Johnson and Mark McCloskey, 8 grandchildren, and 2 brothers Tom and Ed McCloskey. He was a graduate of Chaminade High School Class of 1956 and the University of Dayton in 1960. Then in August 1960 he married his high school sweetheart Norma Jean and they started their new life together in East Lansing, Michigan
    where John earned his master's and doctorate degrees in statistics from Michigan State in 1965. Then he and Norma and their daughter returned to the Dayton area to begin his teaching career at the University of Dayton and
    raise his children. He was professor and chairman of the math department and retired after 40 years of service.
    He was an author of several books and was an avid golfer, getting 7 holes in one. He and Norma made many
    road trips out west, visiting most of the national parks and hiking in the high country. John climbed thirty-two
    14,000 foot peaks and Norma was able to climb 2 of them with him. They both enjoyed hiking and the mountains especially doing it together. The family would like to thank his caretakers at Bethany for all their help and
    support, especially his daughter-in-law Angie Kaufman. Internment at Calvary Cemetery. Online condolences
    may be sent to www.tobiasfuneralhome.com.
    The LSCC will be posting any thoughts or photos of John on the club website. Send them to me
    for inclusion at [email protected] Here are a few…

    Leonard D Augsburger John carried the LSCC on his back for many years. As collector interest ebbed and flowed
    he would write many of the articles needed to fill the pages of the Gobrecht Journal. He was a disciplined student of
    die varieties and made numerous discoveries in the bust and seated series. John was "all business" at coin shows
    and completely focused on the coins and the research. The standard he set for technical research will not be soon
    forgotten. RIP, John.

    Joe Trezza I met John I believe at the ANA Show in 1996, I introduced myself as a member of the LSCC, he was
    such gentlemen and welcome me in open arms, he will certainly be missed in our hobby.

    Mel Hatfield John and I were involved in the planning to found an entity known as the Liberty Seated Collectors
    Club. I served under John as Secretary/Treasurer from 1974-1979. We often would travel to coin shows together
    and share a hotel room...many fun times were had comparing purchases and socializing with friends such as Kam
    Ahwash and others. I will miss you old friend. Rest In Peace. Mel Hatfield, LSCC #0003

    Ken Rubin Sadly I met John in person only a few months back when he was quite ill. However I remember an
    email correspondence in the 1990s where he made me aware of a second reverse of the 1872-s quarter. He went
    above and beyond to help!

    from
    http://www.lsccweb.org/168-E-Gobrecht-Volume15-Issue1.pdf

  • NysotoNysoto Posts: 3,168 ✭✭✭✭✭

    Looking forward to it, William Kneass deserves some recognition for his accomplishments.

    The link to Wizard also works from the "Resources: Books to read on numismatic series" Announcement thread.

    Robert Scot: Engraving Liberty - biography of US Mint's first chief engraver
  • NSPNSP Posts: 160 ✭✭✭

    I’ve been looking forward to this for awhile! I believe these were the last early US coins that didn’t really have a definitive reference guide, but that appears to no longer be the case. I don’t own any of these coins, but I love the designs. Maybe I’ll blow my annual bonus on one of them? Lol.

  • RonyahskiRonyahski Posts: 3,003 ✭✭✭✭✭
    edited March 25, 2020 9:50PM

    @Nysoto said:
    Looking forward to it, William Kneass deserves some recognition for his accomplishments.

    The link to Wizard also works from the "Resources: Books to read on numismatic series" Announcement thread.

    Hi Bill - Thanks for your invaluable input on the book. Bill's book, Robert Scott: Engraving Liberty is a great read and helped tremendously with my research on Kneass.

    The story is commonplace: as Engraver for the U.S. Mint, William Kneass suffered a debilitating stroke, and Christian Gobrecht was immediately hired to take his place as engraver, who designed all U.S. coins going forward.

    To paraphrase Mark Twain, the reports of Mr. Kneass' incapacitation have been greatly exaggerated. It is numislore.

    Some refer to overgraded slabs as Coffins. I like to think of them as Happy Coins.
  • CoinosaurusCoinosaurus Posts: 9,233 ✭✭✭✭✭

    Deluxe copy ordered. Looking forward to it.

  • RonyahskiRonyahski Posts: 3,003 ✭✭✭✭✭

    @Coinosaurus said:
    Deluxe copy ordered. Looking forward to it.

    Thanks Len. The NNP grows stronger. It was a great resource for the book.

    Some refer to overgraded slabs as Coffins. I like to think of them as Happy Coins.
  • MrEurekaMrEureka Posts: 21,895 ✭✭✭✭✭

    My order is in. Thanks!

    Andy Lustig

    Doggedly collecting coins of the Central American Republic.

    Visit the Society of US Pattern Collectors at USPatterns.com.
  • RonyahskiRonyahski Posts: 3,003 ✭✭✭✭✭

    @MrEureka said:
    My order is in. Thanks!

    Thank you.

    Some refer to overgraded slabs as Coffins. I like to think of them as Happy Coins.
  • OldIndianNutKaseOldIndianNutKase Posts: 2,202 ✭✭✭✭✭

    Thanks for the post @Ronyahski. I just ordered the Deluxe Edition. This might be the first time I bought the book before I bought the coin........

    OINK

  • RonyahskiRonyahski Posts: 3,003 ✭✭✭✭✭

    Thanks OINK. You bought the book, now you need to buy the coins.

    Some refer to overgraded slabs as Coffins. I like to think of them as Happy Coins.
  • GazesGazes Posts: 1,574 ✭✭✭✭✭

    Picked up the deluxe version this morning. Excellent topic for a book!

  • BigMooseBigMoose Posts: 1,373 ✭✭✭

    Just put in my order for the Deluxe version. Sounds like a great book!

    TomT-1794

    Check out some of my 1794 Large Cents on www.coingallery.org
  • JustacommemanJustacommeman Posts: 19,595 ✭✭✭✭✭

    In as well. I also super sized it

    m

    Walker Proof Digital Album
    Fellas, leave the tight pants to the ladies. If I can count the coins in your pockets you better use them to call a tailor. Stay thirsty my friends......
  • RonyahskiRonyahski Posts: 3,003 ✭✭✭✭✭

    Yes, many deluxe editions ordered. Thank you to everyone here who has ordered. Your interest in my book alleviates my fear that it would fall on blind eyes.

    Here's an interesting item that I found during my research at the National Archives. It is Mint Certificate #1, issued by the Charlotte branch mint, for the first deposit of gold. The deposit of $2,000 was made on December 4, 1837, the first day the mint opened for operations.

    I stumbled upon this in a pile of Charlotte branch mint documents in a mislabeled file that I doubt anybody had seen before. In fact, all of the early Mint Certificates were in there, scattered about, along with other early mint documents. You are supposed to leave documents exactly as found, but I asked the archive attendants if I could neaten the file, which they approved. I intend to go back and study the entire file.

    Some refer to overgraded slabs as Coffins. I like to think of them as Happy Coins.
  • pocketpiececommemspocketpiececommems Posts: 4,583 ✭✭✭✭✭

    1834-02
    1835-02
    1836-03
    1837-03
    1838-03

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