Jefferson nickel error--messed up coin--what have I got here?

TPRCTPRC Posts: 2,831 ✭✭✭

I am posting this because I don't know errors very well and I want to get opinions on just what I've got here. I intend to submit this at Baltimore. It is one messed up Jefferson. I have heard various comments on what it is as follows, but it certainly has multiple things going on:

  1. It is a mated pair and fits together;
  2. It is at least double struck;
  3. I don't think it is a split planchet as there are light strike impressions on the back side of each piece;
  4. I thought it was a feeder finger, but now I think it is struck on a fragment;
  5. The fragment appears to have a clip;
  6. I have been told that the larger piece is a capped die, and it appears so, as opposed to a broadstrike;
  7. The larger piece weighs 4.93 gms., which I think is within tolerance, and the smaller piece weighs 2.72 gms.; and
  8. FWIW, it is uncirculated and a full step coin, which I grade a 63, and I haven't seen one with this much going on before, but I am also a relative newby on errors, and generally don't collect them.

For now, I am calling it a mated pair, double struck, struck on a fragment with a clip, and with a capped die, or something like that.

Comments welcome.






Tom

Comments

  • bolivarshagnastybolivarshagnasty Posts: 5,272 ✭✭✭✭✭

    It will be interesting to hear what the experts say. I'm calling it FUBB. Use your imagination. :)

  • ErrorsOnCoinsErrorsOnCoins Posts: 9,185 ✭✭✭✭✭
    edited February 11, 2019 6:31PM

    Super awesome mated pair.

    It is a struck fragment, struck into a normal planchet with extra pressure causing the huge broadstrike.

  • DNADaveDNADave Posts: 5,838 ✭✭✭✭

    If I owned it, I think I’d want it slabbed together as the mated pair

    I could see it looking nice in a double slab.

    Nice piece imo

  • jmlanzafjmlanzaf Posts: 5,787 ✭✭✭✭✭

    Nice.

  • AUandAGAUandAG Posts: 20,580 ✭✭✭✭✭

    Wow is a good description....

    bob :)

    BST deals: Dozens of buys/sells. Will provide a list upon request.
    Registry: CC lowballs (boblindstrom), [email protected]
  • bolivarshagnastybolivarshagnasty Posts: 5,272 ✭✭✭✭✭

    @DNADave said:
    If I owned it, I think I’d want it slabbed together as the mated pair

    I could see it looking nice in a double slab.

    Nice piece imo

    What about having it slabbed together in a single holder, but pay for the extra TrueView of the two mated pieces? Two piece slabs don't fit in anything and you would only be paying one $65 fee plus the extra TrueView.

  • ChrisH821ChrisH821 Posts: 2,015 ✭✭✭✭✭

    Looks like it was a piece of the webbing left over from punching out the planchets.

    Collector, occasional seller

  • ChrisH821ChrisH821 Posts: 2,015 ✭✭✭✭✭

    And it looks like the webbing was struck once prior to being struck through into this coin

    Collector, occasional seller

  • BLUEJAYWAYBLUEJAYWAY Posts: 3,470 ✭✭✭✭

    Awesome.

    Successful transactions:Tookybandit
  • gonzergonzer Posts: 2,298 ✭✭✭

    @ChrisH821 said:
    Looks like it was a piece of the webbing left over from punching out the planchets.

    This is something I've never seen being involved in a multi-error coin. Very shwaveebojalay.

  • jesbrokenjesbroken Posts: 2,820 ✭✭✭✭✭

    As interesting a broadstrike that I have seen. Definitely would have them slabbed as a mated pair. Thanks for sharing.
    Jim


    No one has ever had a plan to lose money in numismatics, monies lost is a result of not having a plan.

    Patriotism is supporting your country all the time, and your government when it deserves it.

  • TreashuntTreashunt Posts: 4,274 ✭✭✭✭✭

    neat.

    Frank

    BHNC #203

  • AUandAGAUandAG Posts: 20,580 ✭✭✭✭✭

    This begs to answer the queston: How does scrap get fed into the press? I clearly do not have my mind around this process.

    bob :)

    BST deals: Dozens of buys/sells. Will provide a list upon request.
    Registry: CC lowballs (boblindstrom), [email protected]
  • gripgrip Posts: 9,600 ✭✭✭✭✭

    That's wild. Playing after midnight? Found in a crank-case?

  • CaptHenwayCaptHenway Posts: 26,123 ✭✭✭✭✭

    @bolivarshagnasty said:
    It will be interesting to hear what the experts say. I'm calling it FUBB. Use your imagination. :)

    The correct term is FUBAR.

    Or, as Mr. Spock would say, Fascinating!

    Nice Steps!

    As they say in the wallpaper trade, "How's it hanging?"
  • johnny9434johnny9434 Posts: 18,551 ✭✭✭✭✭

    fubar for sure. I like :)

  • rickoricko Posts: 63,637 ✭✭✭✭✭

    Wow....I will not even venture any further hypothesis as to origin... Where did you get this piece?? I am sure it was not in the coinstar reject slot.... ;) Cheers, RickO

  • bolivarshagnastybolivarshagnasty Posts: 5,272 ✭✭✭✭✭

    @CaptHenway said:

    @bolivarshagnasty said:
    It will be interesting to hear what the experts say. I'm calling it FUBB. Use your imagination. :)

    The correct term is FUBAR.

    Or, as Mr. Spock would say, Fascinating!

    Nice Steps!

    Oh, I recognize it as a Jefferson nickel, but I don't believe it. LOL

  • ErrorsOnCoinsErrorsOnCoins Posts: 9,185 ✭✭✭✭✭

    As to be this being made after midnight, well I do not but that theory, because .......

    .......... the reverse has scratches. I believe these scratches came from the coin being stuck in a machine and then the operator used something to remove this piece resulting in the scratching,

    Had this been done at midnight, I think they would take it out of the machine very carefully.

  • seanqseanq Posts: 7,543 ✭✭✭

    That is a mighty impressive mated pair. It looks like both pieces were struck once individually before being struck together. It is almost a shame to get them slabbed separately because they are so much more interesting to look at when pieced together. Thank you for sharing.

    Sean Reynolds

    Incomplete planchets wanted, especially Lincoln Cents & type coins.

    "Keep in mind that most of what passes as numismatic information is no more than tested opinion at best, and marketing blather at worst. However, I try to choose my words carefully, since I know that you guys are always watching." - Joe O'Connor
  • scubafuelscubafuel Posts: 650 ✭✭✭

    A piece of scrap webbing made it into the coining chamber, was struck once and was not ejected. Then a normal planchet was fed in below and the pair was struck at least two additional times as it stuck to the die.
    I can’t recall seeing this combo before, and it’s certainly a rare and valuable error. Almost a shame to slab these, and not really necessary.

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  • scubafuelscubafuel Posts: 650 ✭✭✭

    BTW, this officially marks the most impressive “what’s this error” thread I can remember!

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  • TPRCTPRC Posts: 2,831 ✭✭✭

    I bought it at my favorite local shop where it had been sitting for quite a while labeled simply as "Mated Pair." I passed over it many times, but once I started looking, there was just too much going on to ignore. However, I paid what I think is a lot for it, as I thought it might be a feeder finger. I don't know how to test for feeder finger material, but I suspect it is a specific gravity test. In any event, it looks like nickel and not aluminum, which is what I think a feeder finger is, so I believe it is just a fragment. And I also think it is only the fragment that is double struck.

    Tom

  • FredWeinbergFredWeinberg Posts: 4,109 ✭✭✭✭✭

    Nice Set - there was a few batches
    of dramatic errors like this that came
    out in the mid-late '60's.......this pair
    is probably from those groups.......

    Should be in a two piece holder, imo,
    not placed in one holder together.

    Collector & Dealer in Major Mint Error Coins & Currency since the 1960's.Co-Author of Whitman's "100 Greatest U.S. Mint Error Coins", and the Error Coin Encyclopedia, Vols., III & IV.
    Authenticator for Major Mint Errors
    for PCGS. A 42 +-Year PNG Member, and an ICTA Board Member.A full time coin dealer since 1972.
  • scubafuelscubafuel Posts: 650 ✭✭✭

    @TPRC look at the reverse of the bottom coin. You can see the lettering from the first strike at the rims and rotated a bit from the second strike, particularly at “of America”.

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  • TPRCTPRC Posts: 2,831 ✭✭✭
    edited February 12, 2019 9:33AM

    @scubafuel said:
    @TPRC look at the reverse of the bottom coin. You can see the lettering from the first strike at the rims and rotated a bit from the second strike, particularly at “of America”.

    I stand corrected, perhaps. I had seen that earlier, but with so much on this coin, I had forgotten it. I am struggling to figure out how any TPG would be able to fit the description of the coin on the slab. Of course, if it is a double slab, that may help. But query-- Is that an actual double strike, or just a stretching and rotating of the out of collar broadstruck reverse?

    Tom

  • telephoto1telephoto1 Posts: 3,372 ✭✭✭

    Looks like a piece of planchet scrap from punching out planchets placed on top of a normal planchet, then struck.


    RIP Mom- 1932-2012
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